Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A white cloth or robe worn by an infant at baptism.
  • n. Archaic An infant wearing a baptismal robe; a baby.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A white cloth, anointed with chrism, or a white mantle thrown over a child when baptized or christened.
  • n. A child that died within a month after its baptism; so called from the chrisom cloth used as a shroud for it.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A white cloth, anointed with chrism, or a white mantle thrown over a child when baptized or christened.
  • n. A child which died within a month after its baptism; -- so called from the chrisom cloth which was used as a shroud for it.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See chrism.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a consecrated ointment consisting of a mixture of oil and balsam

Etymologies

Middle English crisom, variant of crisme, chrisom, chrism; see chrism.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
See chrism. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • If it dies within a month after these ceremonies, it was called a chrisom child.

    Works of John Bunyan — Volume 03

  • A linen cloth anointed with this oil, called a chrisom cloth, is laid upon the baby's face.

    Works of John Bunyan — Volume 03

  • Incredible at a style, more explicit instrumentalities and intellectual charge, as an odoriferous chrisom, she anoints by the singular attars to the wisdom and the creative beauty.

    Nina Mindova author of poetry book"Secret feelings"

  • After the baptism a piece of white linen cloth was placed on the head of the child, and remained there until the mother had been "churched" or purified; it was called the "chrisom cloth" and, if the infant died within a month, was used as a shroud.

    Excerpt: Shakespeare by Peter Ackroyd

  • The place dripped radiance; was filling like a chrisom with radiance.

    The Metal Monster

  • Only three days later, when he took part in the magnificent christening ceremony that named the child Elizabeth, he saw that the iron cross was pinned to the inside of the chrisom, the robe in which the child would be wrapped when she was taken from the baptismal font.

    This Scepter'd Isle

  • Not knowing my true chrisom name, the stranger takes up my words an 'fits 'em to me.

    In Clive's Command A Story of the Fight for India

  • What though its brow the chrisom lacked, I'd lift the golden pin,

    Spun-Yarn and Spindrift

  • "Martin Luther, that false loon, Black Bullinger and Melanchthon" had been smothered in their chrisom-cloths and that St. Paul had never been born.

    The Age of the Reformation

  • They were christened with all the usual ceremonies and with much pomp; sponsors were provided, the bell was sprinkled at the font, anointed with oil, and robed in a chrisom.

    The Worship of the Church and The Beauty of Holiness

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • Anciently, a chrisom was the face-cloth, or piece of linen laid over a child's head when he was baptized or christened. The term has come to refer to a child who died within a month after its baptism—so called for the chrisom cloth that was used as a shroud for it. Wikipedia.

    September 19, 2009

  • Or, a silly person (gilly-gaupus, gawpus, dotterel)

    July 9, 2008