Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An inundation or flood.
  • n. A deposit of sand, gravel, etc. made by oceanic flooding.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A deposit of superficial loam, sand, gravel, stones, etc., caused by former action of flowing waters, or the melting of glacial ice.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A deluge or an inundation; an overflowing.
  • n. Coarse detrital material, wherever found: a term introduced into geology in consequence of a general belief in the past occurrence of a universal deluge.

Etymologies

From Latin dīluvium ("flood"), from lavō ("I wash"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Connected with the diluvium is the history of ossiferous caverns, of which specimens singly exist at Kirkdale in Yorkshire, Gailenreuth in

    Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation

  • In the form and direction of the horns, these famous wild white oxen seem to be living {2} representatives of the race whose bones are found in a fossil state in England and some parts of the Continent in the "diluvium" bone-caves, mixed with the bones of bears, hyenas, and other wild animals, now the cotemporaries of the Bos Gour, or Asiatic Ox, upon mountainous slopes of Western India.

    Notes and Queries, Number 192, July 2, 1853 A Medium of Inter-communication for Literary Men, Artists, Antiquaries, Genealogists, etc

  • Sufficient grounds exist for the assumption that man coexisted with the animals found in the 'diluvium'; and many a barbarous race may, before all historical time, have disappeared, together with the animals of the ancient world, whilst the races whose organization is improved have continued the genus.

    Lectures and Essays

  • The term "diluvium," now obsolete in Britain but still lingering on the Continent, is equivalent to Pleistocene.

    The Antiquity of Man

  • "diluvium," to prove the former co-existence of man with certain extinct mammalia.

    The Antiquity of Man

  • No better example can be found of his anti-diluvium attitudes about life than his totally predictable rants about baseball.

    George Will is still ranting a rant that has been ranted for 50 years.

  • "Along the western base the range diluvium is accumulated in large quantities but in general this formation is not as abundant to the west as to the east of Connecticut river." link

    Archive 2008-03-01

  • That it was beyond doubt that these human relics were traceable to a period at which the latest animals of the diluvium still existed; but that no proof of this assumption, nor consequently of their so-termed ‘fossil’ condition, was afforded by the circumstances under which the bones were discovered.

    Essays

  • Sufficient grounds exist for the assumption that man coexisted with the animals found in the ‘diluvium’; and many a barbarous race may, before all historical time, have disappeared, together with the animals of the ancient world, whilst the races whose organization is improved have continued the genus.

    Essays

  • It has even been supposed that in diluvial deposits the presence of ‘dendrites’ might be regarded as affording a certain mark of distinction between bones mixed with the diluvium at a somewhat later period and the true diluvial relics, to which alone it was supposed that these deposits were confined.

    Essays

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • Railroad telegraph shorthand notation meaning "10:45 p.m. yesterday." --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906, p. 177.

    January 21, 2013