Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The ordinal number matching the number 14 in a series.
  • n. One of 14 equal parts.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. The ordinal form of the number fourteen.
  • n. The person or thing in the fourteenth position.
  • n. One of fourteen equal parts of a whole.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Next in order after the thirteenth.
  • adj. Making or constituting one of fourteen equal parts into which anything may be divided.
  • n. One of fourteen equal parts into which one whole may be divided; the quotient of a unit divided by fourteen.
  • n. The octave of the seventh.
  • n. One next after the thirteenth in a series.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Next after the thirteenth: an ordinal numeral.
  • n. The quotient of unity divided by fourteen; one of fourteen equal parts of anything: as, nine fourteenths of an acre.
  • n. In music, the octave or replicate of the seventh, an interval one diatonic degree less than two octaves.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. position 14 in a countable series of things
  • adj. coming next after the thirteenth in position

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Perhaps not until Joanna in fourteenth-century Naples or Elizabeth I of England would another woman show such political shrewdness and staying power as did Cleopatra during her years atop the throne of Egypt.

    Cleopatra and Antony by Diana Preston: Book summary

  • The fourteenth is locked, and on the other side is only a brick wall, until the day Coraline unlocks the door to find a passage to another flat in another house just like her own.

    Coraline: Summary and book reviews of Coraline by Neil Gaiman.

  • Any moment of the past can be actualized -- and a group of historians can enter, literally, life in fourteenth-century feudal France.

    Timeline: Summary and book reviews of Timeline by Michael Crichton.

  • It’s called Heart’s Blood and is a dark fantasy romance set in fourteenth century Ireland.

    Writer Unboxed » Blog Archive » INTERVIEW: Juliet Marillier, Part 2

  • The end of the century and the beginning of the fourteenth were an especially dynamic period.

    Sensual Encounters: Monastic Women and Spirituality in Medieval Germany

  • Cossacks, whose appearance towards the end of the thirteenth century or at the beginning of the fourteenth was a remarkable event which possibly alone (suggests Gogol) prevented any further inroads by the two Mohammedan nations into Europe.

    Taras Bulba

  • "Then you've got troubles, because tomorrow is the fourteenth, which is like the Fourth of July, and this town locks up."

    CBS: The Power and the Profits

  • The fugitive from Poland, the fugitive from the Tatar and the Turk, homeless, with nothing to lose, their lives ever exposed to danger, forsook their peaceful occupations and became transformed into a warlike people, known as the Cossacks, whose appearance towards the end of the thirteenth century or at the beginning of the fourteenth was a remarkable event which possibly alone (suggests Gogol) prevented any further inroads by the two Mohammedan nations into Europe.

    Taras Bulba and Other Tales

  • It may be necessary, therefore, to explain to those who are unacquainted with the Italian mode of speaking in this respect that the Italians always speak of what we should call the fourteenth century as the "trecento," what we should call the fifteenth, as the

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Volume 17, No. 102, June, 1876

  • Every day it seems to me less likely that we will be free in early December and today I was told that Mr. Spaak was setting the closing date for December fourteenth, which is after the date of your committee meeting in Washington.

    Eleanor Roosevelt and Harry Truman

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