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  • Yeah, that's about it. Except for the freezer taste. Paddle pops taste like nirvana on a stick.

    July 1, 2008

  • Sounds like pretty much the same thing, pleth--chocolate ice creamish stuff on a stick? Usually tastes like freezer? :-)

    July 1, 2008

  • You said it pleth.

    July 1, 2008

  • Down under, I like to think of all of you as "America". Just sayin'.

    And I'm not sure what this fudgsicle of which you speak is, but it sounds to me like a chocolate paddle pop.

    July 1, 2008

  • I'm not a fan of Jersey. New or otherwise. Maybe it's because I lived there, once. Worst beach ever. *shuddering*

    July 1, 2008

  • rolig - as a curious American myself ;-) I always spell them "judgement" and "acknowledgement."

    As for the frozen treat, my parents and grandparents pronounce it: "fudge-ickle." I did as well until I left home and got "schooled." Now I 'say' "fudge-sickle" -- but I don't know how I spell it 'cause I never do...

    July 1, 2008

  • Skipvia: You were in Cape May and didn't call?? Hmph.

    Rolig: Fudgsicle is a brand name (from the company that makes Popsicles), so fudgicle is right out. Hmph.

    Oh, and those of us in PA living near New Jersey call it "Jersey." When we're not cursing it, that is. ;-)

    July 1, 2008

  • I don't mind rollie, just as long as Arlo Guthrie can make it rhyme with motorcycle.

    Hawaii's not so much upper or lower as a long way west. It's sider.

    July 1, 2008

  • Sorry guys if I am interrupting your toponymic digression to comment on the word at hand, but shouldn't "fudgsicle" be spelled "fudgesicle"? Is the silent "e" being dropped by analogy with the curious American spellings of words like judgment and acknowledgment (can't think of any more at the moment)? I find these spellings curious because it's that silent "e" that makes the -dg- soft (i.e. pronounced like a "j").

    By the way, if we take the etymology of icicle ("ice" + "ickle") as the model, then the word should indeed be fudgicle (sorry, reesetee!).

    That's all, folks. Resume.

    July 1, 2008

  • I wonder Hawaii they do that.

    July 1, 2008

  • In Hawaii, they refer to Hawaii as "Hawai'i". Or so I've heard.

    July 1, 2008

  • Pro, someone from Michigan would tell you that U.P. means the Upper Peninsula--that part of the state that's separated from the rest of it by Lake Michigan. I'd suggest it feels more like Canada than the US, eh?

    July 1, 2008

  • So, how do you refer to New Jersey? I used to favor "the nation's armpit," but that was before I spent a delightful week in Cape May earlier this spring.

    July 1, 2008

  • I can't help you, c_b, I don't really know what U.P. is for.

    July 1, 2008

  • It's enough to give me the howling fantods.

    July 1, 2008

  • I'm totally freaked out. In Virginia, we also refer to Hawaii as "Hawaii." What is UP with this?!

    July 1, 2008

  • That's okay. In Pennsylvania, we also refer to Pennsylvania as "PA."

    July 1, 2008

  • Ditto for Maryland, although sometimes we refer to Pennsylvania as "P.A."

    July 1, 2008

  • That's odd. In Pennsylvania, we also refer to Hawaii as "Hawaii."

    July 1, 2008

  • "Outside" means anywhere that is not Alaska, not just the lower 48. Asativum is correct in that "down south" usually refers to going to Seattle, since you typically have to go there to get anywhere else.

    In Alaska, we refer to Hawaii as "Hawaii."

    June 30, 2008

  • If the continental U.S. is the lower 48, what's Hawaii? The lower 1?

    John, I like this word, unless it's mispronounced as "fudgicle." *shudder* I always thought it was a contraction of "fudge popsicle," though.

    June 30, 2008

  • What, you mean Alaskans don't really refer to the Lower 48 as "Outside," like Alaska magazine does?

    I did hear "down south" a lot when I was there, usually meaning Seattle.

    June 30, 2008

  • If you don't believe Alaska exists, you'll just have to make one .

    June 30, 2008

  • Pro--we've suggested that the folks in the lower 48 refer to Alaska as "the upper 1," but for some reason it has never caught on.

    Yarb--I wake up every morning wondering about that myself.

    June 30, 2008

  • I've been to Alaska, and I'm still not convinced it's real.

    June 30, 2008

  • I love "the lower 48". Not many people can use that - well, just those who pretend to live in Alaska.

    June 30, 2008

  • Shhh. We're trying to keep it a secret. Most of the folks in the lower 48 don't know we're part of the US, and we like it that way.

    It's all a state of mind, anyway.

    June 30, 2008

  • Skipvia, we all know Alaska doesn't exist. So why do you go on pretending you live there?

    June 30, 2008

  • Right next to the banana stalactite, John.

    But only in the winter...

    June 30, 2008

  • Can't believe I'm the first to list this. I just ate four of them.

    I love a good fudgsicle, but it's kind of a gross word when you think that it's basically a contraction of "fudge icicle." Sounds like something you find in an Alaskan outhouse.

    June 30, 2008