Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Worship of the saints.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The worship of saints.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The invocation or worship of saints.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The worship of saints. In the Roman Catholic Church it is distinguished from the latria, or supreme worship due to God alone. See dulia.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the worship of saints

Etymologies

Ancient Greek ἅγιος (hagios, "pious") + λατρεία (latreia, "worship"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • On this fact hypothesis I remark that, if the shipwrecked foreigners were educated men, or only possessed of such Scriptural knowledge as was then imparted to the commonality of laymen, it is morally impossible to conceive that a Spaniard of the sixteenth century should confine his instruction to some of the leading events of the Old Testament, and be totally silent upon the Christian dispensation, and the cruciolatry, mariolatry, and hagiolatry of that day.

    Hawaiian Folk Tales A Collection of Native Legends

  • In addition, female figures were prominent in the Irish Catholic hagiolatry of the area, harking back to the powerful position of goddesses and female druids in the pagan Celtic belief system, a status that carried over into early Celtic Christianity.

    Gutenber-e Help Page

  • The Mariolatry is excessive, and the hagiolatry offensive.

    Hymns of the Greek Church Translated with Introduction and Notes

  • Though far from a scientific conception of natural law, many men had become sufficiently monistic in their philosophy to see in the current hagiolatry a sort of polytheism.

    The Age of the Reformation

  • I should be sorry to find you far gone in hagiolatry.

    Gryll Grange

  • But, if the hagiolatry of Waters and Pollan isn't your cup of organic oolong, howzabout lending an ear to Chef Michel Nischan's take on these more Earth-attentive buying practices.

    Slashfood

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Comments

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  • Yes?

    November 5, 2011

  • Plethora!

    November 4, 2011

  • Plethora!

    November 4, 2011

  • Bilby, I take umbrage at the fact that you didn't bracket gobbets of linguistic snickersnack.

    November 4, 2011

  • "To further clarify, this word is not found in...the OED. "

    Actually, it is.

    christinerick, your not liking a word's definition does not magically invalidate it. If you have a problem with the CD&C definition 3 part 2 above please write to them about it. Wordnik simply aggregates definitions and other gobbets of linguistic snickersnack from various sources around the internet.
    Just because you claim that Catholics do not practise hagiolatry does not mean the word should not exist. The word Hell exists, even if you do not wish to go there. And masturbation, even if you choose not crank-start your chainsaw. Etc.
    In any case even words with archaic meanings or meanings that are misconceptions are useful as historical markers of the way things were and may ever be required for the reading of period texts.
    Take it easy with the rosary rattling.

    November 4, 2011

  • Here's the iroquoisy example about Spaniards:

    “On this fact hypothesis I remark that, if the shipwrecked foreigners were educated men, or only possessed of such Scriptural knowledge as was then imparted to the commonality of laymen, it is morally impossible to conceive that a Spaniard of the sixteenth century should confine his instruction to some of the leading events of the Old Testament, and be totally silent upon the Christian dispensation, and the cruciolatry, mariolatry, and hagiolatry of that day.”
    --Hawaiian Folk Tales A Collection of Native Legends

    November 3, 2011

  • My compact edition of the OED has tiny print, but I'm pretty sure it has "Hagiolatry" as "The worship of saints." Its first example (from 1808) reads as follows: "Reducing the established hagiolatry to that posthumous veneration for the benefactors of the human race, which is the natural religion of every grateful heart." Its second example (from 1855) reads: "The error was in the hagiolatry or adoration of saints, not in the adoration of the image."

    November 3, 2011

  • a half-barbered barbarian- a dulia to adulate - a work in process.

    hierarchy is 'holy order' that is much more difficult to evaluate well.

    November 3, 2011

  • A barbarian!

    November 3, 2011

  • One of my favorite saints is Philip of Neri who shaved off half his beard right before a dinner honoring him because people were becoming too serious about him- sort of a halfiography that is the perhaps the proper perspective.

    November 3, 2011

  • Where's Erick? Don't keep him hidden from all those looking for Christ.

    November 3, 2011

  • I worship St. Gertrude of Nivelles, patron saint of mice, so it is a word after all.

    November 2, 2011

  • I'd like to point out that diabetology is a word too.

    November 2, 2011

  • By that somewhat contorted rationale, "idolatry" would not be a word either. To point out just one flaw in your logic, not everyone in the world is Catholic.
    "Hagiolatry" is indeed a word; perhaps you should just deal with it and move on.

    November 2, 2011

  • So Christinerick, in your opinion, devout Catholics do not practice hagiolatry? If you agree with that statement, then you would agree that "hagiolatry" is a word. We don't get to choose what is or is not a word on the basis of whether we support the concept the word represents.

    November 2, 2011