Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A former spelling of hurst.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • You can follow him on www. twitter.com/joelhirst, www. joelhirst.com and www. facebook.com/joel-hirst

    Joel D. Hirst: Bolivia: Control Racism or Control Speech?

  • You can follow him on www.twitter.com/joelhirst, www.joelhirst.com and www.facebook.com/joel-hirst

    Joel D. Hirst: Bolivia: Control Racism or Control Speech?

  • Edward Glendinning hath sent for Dan of the Howlet-hirst, and young Adie of Aikenshaw, and they are come with three men more, and with bow, and jack, and spear, and I heard them say to each other, and to

    The Monastery

  • Howlet-hirst to his comrades; “I trow the Glendinnings may die and come alive right oft, ere I put foot in stirrup again for the matter.”

    The Monastery

  • Howlet-hirst, “has murdered young Halbert Glendinning yesterday morning, and we have all risen to the fray.”

    The Monastery

  • And when the ex-dragon stood on the floor of the church, he presented to Halbert Glendinning the well-known countenance of Dan of the Howlet-hirst, an ancient comrade of his own, ere fate had raised him so high above the rank to which he was born.

    The Abbot

  • Howlet-hirst, suddenly resisting the efforts of Woodcock, who was dragging him out of the church; when the quick military eye of Sir Halbert

    The Abbot

  • But it is one of Scott's first principles of moral law that cunning never shall succeed, unless definitely employed _against an enemy_ by a person whose essential character is wholly frank and true; as by Roland against Lady Lochleven, or Mysie Happer against Dan of the Howlet-hirst; but consistent cunning in the character always fails: Scott allows no Ulyssean hero.

    On the Old Road, Vol. 2 (of 2) A Collection of Miscellaneous Essays and Articles on Art and Literature

  • Edward Glendinning hath sent for Dan of the Howlet-hirst, and young

    The Monastery

  • "Here's cold hospitality," quoth Dan of the Howlet-hirst to his comrades; "I trow the Glendinnings may die and come alive right oft, ere I put foot in stirrup again for the matter."

    The Monastery

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