Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act of burial.
  • n. The act of burying vessels in warm earth in order to expose their contents to a steady moderate heat; the state of being thus exposed.
  • n. arenation

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act of inhuming or burying; interment.
  • n. The act of burying vessels in warm earth in order to expose their contents to a steady moderate heat; the state of being thus exposed.
  • n. Arenation.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The act of burying in the ground, especially as opposed to incremation; interment.
  • n. In chem., a method, now obsolete, of digesting substances by burying the vessel containing them in warm earth or manure.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the ritual placing of a corpse in a grave

Etymologies

From inhume +‎ -ation (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Death isn’t good for profits, you see, and self-inhumation is taken very seriously.

    365 tomorrows » 2007 » May : A New Free Flash Fiction SciFi Story Every Day

  • Like the others she had seen, this was no careful inhumation, but the hurried concealment of a crime.

    FALSE MERMAID

  • One of the funerary practices in widespread use by the early English ‘Anglo-Saxons’, before they converted to Christianity, was inhumation burial with grave goods.

    Archive 2010-05-01

  • Two other inhumation burials, each containing a man buried with weapons and a horse, were excavated at RAF Lakenheath in 1997 and 1999.

    Horses in seventh-century England

  • I remember one study from an English inhumation cemetery (I will look up the reference when I have time) reported the average (mean, I think) height of the men at around six feet.

    Horses in seventh-century England

  • The Jewish nation, though they entertained the old way of inhumation, yet sometimes admitted this practice.

    Hydriotaphia, or Urn-burial

  • Many have taken voluminous pains to determine the state of the soul upon disunion; but men have been most phantastical in the singular contrivances of their corporal dissolution: whilst the soberest nations have rested in two ways, of simple inhumation and burning.

    Hydriotaphia, or Urn-burial

  • Single inhumation was the most common form of burial, although cremation was also used.

    Under Albanian Soil

  • Through these analyses we will be able to determine the evolution of the Sagalassos population's diet and find any hierarchy in the access of resources (correlated to anthropological data (sex, age, DNA result, etc.), topographic data (location of the graves) and period of inhumation).

    Interactive Dig Sagalassos - Paleoanthropology Report 1

  • Again, only DNA analysis will allow us to determine if this "marginal" burial area had a special function; for example, dedicated to the inhumation of mothers and children from one family.

    Interactive Dig Sagalassos - Biological Anthropology Report 1

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  • "2. In chem., a method, now obsolete, of digesting substances by burying the vessel containing them in warm earth or manure." --Cent. Dict.

    May 16, 2011