Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. An iron bucket used in wells or mines for hoisting water, ore, or refuse to the surface.
  • transitive v. To crush or grind (grain, for example) coarsely.
  • n. Meal ground by this process and used in the form of pellets especially for pet food.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. to grind something coarsely
  • n. something that has been kibbled, especially grain for use as animal feed
  • n. an iron bucket used in mines for hoisting anything to the surface

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A large iron bucket used in Cornwall and Wales for raising ore out of mines.
  • transitive v. To bruise; to grind coarsely.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To bruise or grind coarsely, as malt, beans, etc.
  • To clip roughly, as a stone.
  • To walk lame.
  • To hoist ore or refuse in a mine-bucket or kibble.
  • n. The bucket of a draw-well, or of the shaft of a mine. [Prov. Eng.]
  • n. A stick with a curve or knob at the end, used in playing the game of nurspell.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an iron bucket used for hoisting in wells or mining
  • n. coarsely ground grain in the form of pellets (as for pet food)

Etymologies

Probably from German Kübel, pail, from Middle High German, from Old High German -chublī (in miluhchublī, milk pail), from Vulgar Latin *cupia, from Latin cūpa, vat.
Origin unknown.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Unknown; verb sense c. 1790, Shropshire dialect,[2] perhaps variant of chip.[3] (Wiktionary)
German Kübel ("pail"), from Middle High German, from Old High German -chublī (in miluhchublī ("milk pail")), from Vulgar Latin *cupia, from Latin cūpa. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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  • The famous Kibble Palace in the Botanic Gardens is probably one of Glasgow's best-loved buildings.

    June 23, 2008