Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Gentleness of manner; mildness.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Gentleness, tameness.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Tameness; gentleness; mildness.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Tameness; habitual mildness or gentleness.

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French, from Latin mānsuētūdō, from mānsuētus, past participle of mānsuēscere, to tame : manus, hand; see man-2 in Indo-European roots + suēscere, to accustom; see s(w)e- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Via Middle French mansuetude or directly from Latin mansuētūdō, from mansuētus, perfect passive participle of mansuēscō ("I tame"), from manus ("hand") + suēscō ("become accustomed"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • It gives a "mansuetude" (new word for me) to the chill of winter.

    mansuetude - French Word-A-Day

  • Paul, I vaticinate that the mansuetude of your response will bring out the best of my muliebrity.

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  • It is apodeictic that the caliginosity of the agrestic embrangle periapts with mansuetude.

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  • Listed below are links to weblogs that reference mansuetude:

    mansuetude - French Word-A-Day

  • With mansuetude compossible with my muliebrity, I condemn those niddering, olid morons who, in caliginosity of understanding, vilipend our English by attempting to exuviate words for which they cannot see any present custom.

    Archive 2008-10-01

  • To this religion of such charming mansuetude whenever it has the upper hand, a Protestant engineer named Gerard is converted by puerile arguments which in any other domain than the theological would seem to be the divagations of a lunatic; and the Cure Bonnet proclaims the necessity of passive obedience by the masses to the

    Balzac

  • Princely and naturall mansuetude then of my merite.

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • To this religion of such charming mansuetude whenever it has the upper hand, a Protestant engineer named Gerard is converted by puerile arguments which in any other domain than the theological would seem to be the divagations of

    Balzac

  • I love to bring these aborigines back to the mansuetude they showed to the early voyagers, and before (forgive the involuntary pun), they had grown accustomed to man and knew his savage ways.

    Choice Specimens of American Literature, and Literary Reader Being Selections from the Chief American Writers

  • He veneered his whole character with such an engaging mansuetude as served to deceive the most penetrative of those he met, and not even the most suspicious of his Ottawa acquaintances had ever insinuated that a surface so calm and unruffled as his could ever cover a phase of character which could be nocent or even objectionable in the least degree.

    Honor Edgeworth Ottawa's Present Tense

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Comments

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  • With filial love the bro is imbued;
    To help his old Ma’s his habitude.
    And though it require
    He greatly perspire
    That noble damp is man sweat, dude.

    December 6, 2014

  • From p. 14 of Patrick Leigh Fermor's "A Time to Keep Silence":

    Their eyelids were always downcast; and, if now and then they were raised, no treacherous glint appeared, nothing but a sedulously cultivated calmness, withdrawal and mansuetude and occasionally an expression of remote and burnt-out melancholy.

    January 21, 2014

  • See a usage note on hemicrania.

    February 27, 2008

  • as if your "manner" is falling into "desuetude"

    January 28, 2008

  • from the Ring and the Book.

    October 1, 2007