Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A large covered earthenware or metal cooking pot.
  • n. A small covered earthenware casserole designed to hold an individual serving.
  • n. A petite marmite.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A rounded earthenware cooking pot.

Etymologies

French, from Old French, hypocritical, marmite (possibly because the food is hidden inside) : marm-, akin to marmouser, to murmur + mite, cat (of imitative origin).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From French marmite. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • I doubt you have ever heard a gay person say “As a gay person, my opinion on politics/the economy/football/marmite is …”

    Five Go Camping In Hampshire « POLICE INSPECTOR BLOG

  • food science: marmite is the french for turing | FreakyTrigger

    food science: marmite is the french for turing | FreakyTrigger

  • There were toast crumbs in the butter, so I’ve already come up with a dozen ways to kill you; the marmite is just another mitigating circumstance when it comes to trial.

    …things that niggle. « Sven’s guide to…

  • Well, the name comes from the name of a French casserole dish called a marmite pronounced Marmeet.

    BBC News - Home

  • The British breakfast staple, which was originally sold in earthenware jars that resembled the French stockpot called a marmite, was born more than 100 years ago in a small town called Burton-On-Trent.

    NPR Topics: News

  • Extended family, of sorts, visited today and delivered this lovely little "marmite" made of chocolate that is given at this time of the year in Geneva.

    12/02/2007

  • Vegemite is Australian, we eat marmite, which is - coincidentally - made of Brewers Yeast, a by-product of Burton-on - Trent’s brewing industry.

    When you booze you lose « Awful Library Books

  • The keeping of the roads in good condition is necessary for the rapid carrying out of operations on the Front, and a "marmite" hole is promptly filled if by a lucky shot the German batteries happen to tear up the roadway.

    The White Road to Verdun

  • The keeping of the roads in good condition is necessary for the rapid carrying out of operations on the front, and a "marmite" hole is promptly filled if by a lucky shot the German batteries happen to tear up the roadway.

    The White Road to Verdun

  • So after three "safely Zeppelin" yet developed and progressive songs, we begin to enter the extremes of the album, the diverse, the controversial, the "marmite", the crunge ...

    Latest reviews @ Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

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Comments

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  • November 29, 2010

  • Thanks, plethora. I feel vindicated. :)

    May 10, 2010

  • *gasp* pleth! Where've you been???

    May 9, 2010

  • On the topic of the Vegemite and peanut butter combination: it was common practice at boarding school to have two pieces of toast for breakfast - one with peanut butter and one with Vegemite. The transition between the slices often results in a bit of flavour mixing.
    I don't recommend it.

    May 8, 2010

  • You can't go wrong with an egg and spam bap.

    April 18, 2009

  • I maintain my stand that Promite is good and Vegemite is only slightly less-good (more Raid-tasting).

    I may, someday, try Vegemite and peanut butter, just to see what happens to this page.

    p.s. Pleth, thanks for the song. It put a rose in my cheek—in every one of them, actually. :)

    April 18, 2009

  • Why don't you open up a jar of evil, Pro? You know you want to.....

    April 18, 2009

  • The comment below was meant to show

    1) how everything is relative
    2) how conservative (the average) Italians are about food.

    April 18, 2009

  • *loves this page, but must convince himself none of the sandwiches listed below is real*

    [except, maybe, for cheese-lettuce-mayo (although I'd say cheese-lettuce-tomato instead)]

    April 18, 2009

  • "Marmite - also known as 'the jar of evil'. It is a yeast extract product that Brits spread onto toasted bread with butter."
    - unattributed, 'An American perspective on the delights of UK living', americanexpats.co.uk, cited 21 Feb 2009.

    February 21, 2009

  • Trivet, have I told you how much I like your family? :-)

    I'm with c_b, though, on at least one of her abominations. Marshmallow is fit only as ammunition in an Arsenal for Civil Defunse.

    July 24, 2008

  • Well if we're talking weird sandwich fillings:
    My best friends parents told me that when they were courting (in wartime), one time he arrived with a steak-and-kidney pudding sandwich.
    Me, I like avocado and bacon, or just avocado on its own; cheese is magical though - not usually available in China though, so when I'm back in UK for the summer, I usually od on cheese. Also bread in all its forms. And chocolate!

    July 22, 2008

  • Well slap me down with a bunch of rocket!

    July 22, 2008

  • Oh, no! You see, the sandwich gods brought them together for the sole purpose of redistributing previously mis-matched sandwich fixings (with some lettuce they found along the way...) Voila! Two new sandwiches were born: peanut butter and jam (raspberry only, thank-you-very-much) and cheese, lettuce and mayonnaise. *angels singing*

    July 22, 2008

  • I admire the person you have become, trivet, given that you were brought up in a den of sandwich crime.

    July 22, 2008

  • Bilby, the peanut butter and pickle combination has a certain je ne sais quoi. But then, my parents are odd about sandwiches.

    My mother was sent to school every day with a cheddar cheese and jam sandwich in her Dale Evans lunch box. My father's contained peanut butter and mayonnaise.

    July 22, 2008

  • You'll have to see the Abominations list. I'm surprised CPS isn't already there putting handcuffs on you.

    (hint: bananas and marshmallow. How could you let those... those... substances touch the food of the gods?!)

    July 22, 2008

  • c_b et al: What possible problem can you have with PBF??? It's sweet and fatty and salty and I was never allowed to eat it as a child, which always makes things taste better. (c_b, clarification would help. Which two combinations are worthy of a call to cps?)

    July 22, 2008

  • Cb, I'm with you all the way. I like a smooth peanut butter in my satay sauce, but with some chopped peanuts sprinkled on top.

    And jenn, I love my pb with honey, but I find it difficult to eat without getting goo everywhere, so it can only be eaten when I'm alone.

    July 22, 2008

  • PS: I'm also really not fond of Nigella Lawson. Sorry.

    July 22, 2008

  • I agree cruchy pb for sammies, creamy for satay. Sorry to have to admit that I like creamy on toasted rye (with seeds) with sliced bananas on top...I know... I'm not suggesting that anyone try it. I think it's MY thing. I don't have an excuse.

    July 22, 2008

  • @jennarenn: Peanut butter and fluff?! I'm glad we don't have navels.
    @trivet: What planet is he from?
    @chained_bear: Satay sauce is better with crunchy. It's just a crunchy world and that's all there is to it.

    In any case, peanut butter is redundant before the power of Marmite. As Nigella Lawson demonstrates:
    "Whisk soft unsalted butter with some Marmite and then spread the peanut-butter coloured mix on to sliced white bread. 100g butter is enough to sandwich the slices of one loaf, the quantity of Marmite depends on whether you want a mild-tasting, buff-coloured cream or a salty-strong, sunbed-tan glaze."

    There are in fact two different Marmites. They were originally one and the same, but the New Zealand one has evolved along different lines from the British one, which is also made in South Africa. Look out! Marmite soldiers have you surrounded!

    July 22, 2008

  • Crunchy pb. Always.

    Now if you'll excuse me, I have some peanut butter to consume.

    July 22, 2008

  • Jennarenn. You have listed two bona-fide abominations on your list of items to eat with peanut butter. I have already placed a call to Child Protective Services. You should expect a knock at the door shortly.

    July 22, 2008

  • My father's favorite is peanut butter and pickle. That's not to sweet for you, bilby, is it?

    July 22, 2008

  • jmp: You feed that junk to *children*? I think I may have to call Child Protectivce Services on the lot of you.

    Peanut butter is a pretty amazing food item. Have you ever had:

    Peanut butter and fluff?
    Peanut butter and honey?
    Peanut butter and banana?

    c_b: Amen. Crunchy all the way.

    July 22, 2008

  • Dontcry: Creamy is for weenies, or for making satay sauce or a nice Chinese noodle dish. Crunchy all the way.

    Bilby: To the death.

    Have you not considered the peanutty gooeyness is perfectly matched by the sugary fruitiness?

    July 22, 2008

  • c_b, good point about the Raid!

    Are Aussie hangovers worse than other hangovers because they're upside-down?

    I'll pass on the natto I'm out of the wordie food challenge business. My marriage depends on it!

    Ditto on PB&J! Crunchy or creamy?

    July 22, 2008

  • Peanut butter and jam ... but ... why? Enough sugar to stop clock and enough sticky-goo to cement it to the difficult-to-reach parts of your mouth for a week. It's enough to make my inner Righteous Dentist positively bristle.

    July 21, 2008

  • I like Promite and Vegemite, never got into Marmite.

    Dontcry, I think in your description of how Marmite tastes, you left out "add a teaspoon of Raid bug killer."

    Also, DC, when you get hangovers like Aussies get, you'll learn to love Vegemite. You can feel like the scum on the floor of a restroom in a sleazy bar, eat some Vegemite, and half an hour later you'll be turning cartwheels. I have done this.

    Also, I challenge you, if you really think Marmite's the most disgusting thing you've ever put in your mouth, to try some natto. Natto wins hands down. I dare you. I double-dog dare you.

    I will defend peanut butter and jelly (which is not what antipodeans and UK-ites call jelly and Americans call Jell-O; it is what antipodeans and UK-ites would call jam) to the death. And I have done this.

    July 21, 2008

  • Gravy by gangerh. In defence of Marmite. Quantities to taste.
    Stock,meat juices,vegetable water,mustard,cornflour,honey,herbs de provence,sherry or port or wine or whisky,MARMITE or Bovril,etc, etc.
    Never the same twice but always smells intoxicating.
    Add specifics like sweet chilli sauce relative to dish.

    July 20, 2008

  • peanut butter + anything = barf! Peanut butter itself is pretty barf too, except as a base for making satay sauce.

    July 20, 2008

  • Peanut butter and jam = yum.
    Vegmite = delicious.

    I will defend the above until death.

    July 20, 2008

  • Marmite on toast is delicious, elthough it does have to be spread very thinly. Babies love it on toast fingers and they go num-num. UK babies that is.

    But peanut butter and jelly? Yuk! Who could think of such an abomination?

    July 20, 2008

  • I don't care that Australians don't have navels. And their little pouches are kind of endearing. But that song is deeply disturbing, as is the entire spreadable mite phenomenon.

    July 20, 2008

  • That song is a musical masterpiece. I don't think I know an Australian who can't sing it on command, haha. I tried to find the original ad with the cute little children who are even more persuasive, but it evaded me.

    And I totally agree that marmite is festy, but I maintain that vegemite is fantabulous.

    July 20, 2008

  • I have to go to bed, but before I do, I beg those of you who have not tried the "mite" products: DO NOT EAT IT. THEY ARE DISGUSTING.

    July 20, 2008

  • My God! It's an abomination! You people seriously need to crawl up and eat some real food stuff.

    July 20, 2008

  • Plethora -- Really? THAT song was supposed to change my mind about what has to be the most vile substance I ever have placed into my mouth? Seriously? Are you kidding?

    July 20, 2008

  • Yes, dc, but you only had Marmite. Vegemite is delicious. And it even has a song!

    July 19, 2008

  • Hilarious description dontcry, please send that to the Marmite people!

    Overseas I continually meet streams of Australian travellers toting a jar of vegemite, terrified that they may run out of the magic potion in their hour of need.

    July 19, 2008

  • So, we've decided that this vegemite/marmite/promite crap is just a huge "downunder" joke, right? None of you actually eat this crap. I've got to give it to you -- very funny!

    Here's what it tastes like: if you left the coffee pot on the burner with just a tablespoon of coffee in it and that coffee got burned and reduced to a teaspoon of sticky paste, then you added about a tablespoon of salt to it, then you set it on fire and put the fire out with salt....that's what it taste like.

    July 19, 2008

  • Yes! Come over here and stand next to me, dontcry! And your husband too!

    July 19, 2008

  • So, my husband was mixing the meat for burgers when I popped the marmite into his mouth. At first he got a curious look on his face, then the curiosity turned to horror. He looked left and right, trying to figure out what had just happened to him. I could see he wanted to pull out the garbage pail and spit, but he was up to his wrists in ground turkey. His eyes narrowed into a glare as he looked at me and swallowed.

    Things went downhill from there...

    July 19, 2008

  • jmp - that's the best reason yet to visit China.

    July 19, 2008

  • marmite art

    July 19, 2008

  • Excellent on hot buttered crumpets, as is honey. But not in combination!

    July 19, 2008

  • Just had my lunch - cheese & marmite sandwiches, also corned beef and branston pickle

    Delicious. Can't get that in China! In fact can hardly even get bread.

    July 19, 2008

  • I am literally on tenterhooks!

    July 19, 2008

  • You'll have to do better than that! I have to sleep next to him tonight... Good-night. I'll check back in the (US East Coast) morning! BTW: I tried it too and I'll give my honest review in the morning.

    Pro -- you'd better be sound asleep, mr. bunny! (What did you have for dinner last night? Spare no details...).

    July 19, 2008

  • Aww... see, now I feel bad (not!).

    I popped a piece of freshly baked and fabulously toasted and buttery croissant, "thinly spread" with marmite into my beloved's mouth moments ago.

    You'll have to beg me for the results. (Hint: it will be worth it!).

    July 19, 2008

  • It was the corn chip. Marmite on corn chips is just plain sinful.

    July 19, 2008

  • *snort* I got my daughter's boyfriend to try a bit on a corn chip. He obliged, trying (always trying...) to ingratiate himself to me. He had to spit it out hork it into the garbage pail. If I liked him (or her) better, I'd have given him a bit of croissant to try it on instead...yes, I have an evil side.

    My next victim, my husband, who is due any moment now. He won't be as easily fooled. I'm going to try to pass it off as a homemade black olive tapanade. Shhhh. (hee, hee!)

    July 19, 2008

  • Slowly! Appreciation of the Distilled Essence of Marm should not be rushed.

    July 19, 2008

  • Okay, skip, I'll give it a sniff -- but bilby's got me all worked up about my kidneys, and yarb's just being a dick (sory, yarb, I plead scorpioptic).

    Here goes...it smells like burnt something. Coffee? Chocolate? Mar?

    I'm not eating it -- not yet anyway. I need some witnesses.

    July 19, 2008

  • I may change my mind on Marmite before it deteriorates completely:

    "In a study lasting three years, Jane Durga, of Wageningen University in the Netherlands, and her colleagues found that people taking such supplements did better on measures of memory, information-processing speed and verbal fluency. That, plus evidence that folate deficiency is associated with clinical depression, suggests eating spinach, orange juice and Marmite, which are all rich in folic acid."
    -Economist.com

    July 19, 2008

  • THAT was NOT helpful, yarb! I have excellent taste and now I fear I'll never open that teeny, tiny, expensive jar of...whatever-the-hell-it-is!

    It looks like molasses from the outside...

    July 19, 2008

  • People either love Marmite, or they have good taste. Which are you, dontcry?

    July 19, 2008

  • Okay, so I'm at the grocery store today and my curiosity got the best of me...and I purchased a jar of marmite. It looks just like the picture here! I wanted to get vegemite, but this was all they had in the tiny little "English/Irish" food section.

    Anyhoo, now I'm afraid to try it...I'm even afraid to open it and give it a sniff...

    Courage, please...

    July 19, 2008

  • Yes dear.

    July 18, 2008

  • ....ohhh...that does sound delicious...to DEER!

    July 18, 2008

  • Oh, you want to slather it on. It's just that the high salt content will give your kidneys a dose of the howling fantods if you do.

    July 18, 2008

  • It warns you right on the label to "spread thinly." How good can it be if you don't want to slather it on?

    Babies also love rice flakes mixed with breast milk...

    July 18, 2008

  • Marmite is delicious. Babies love it. Love it? Hate It?

    July 18, 2008

  • *hork*

    July 18, 2008

  • It's what you use for making marmotatouille.

    July 18, 2008

  • Marmite and Promite are abominations.

    July 17, 2008

  • It's French for stockpot.
    - look at the picture on the label

    July 17, 2008

  • Are these weirdnet definitions which identify marmite as a kind of pot legit?

    July 17, 2008