Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Tending to protrude; protruding.
  • adj. Unduly or disagreeably conspicuous; obtrusive.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. that protrudes; protruding
  • adj. rather conspicuous; obtrusive

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Thrusting or impelling forward.
  • adj. Capable of being protruded; protrusile.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Thrusting or impelling forward; obtrusive; protruding: as, protrusive motion.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. thrusting outward

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Book of Hours begins with an image of the twin towers, protrusive amongst the mid-rise buildings that surrounded them at ground zero.

    Rachel Anne Farquharson: George Walker's Book of Hours: The Significance of a Decade Passed

  • A lustreless protrusive eye Stares from the protozoic slime the future looks fine

    david swanson : honeymoon over

  • The second, I have already articulated: because I must find outlets to purge my illness as a participant in this disgusting sub-race of individuals with testosterone-driven protrusive genitalia, who has at one or more points in his life harbored thoughts of sexual violence toward women, even, if only by engaging in sexual intercourse that was devoid of genuine love or affection.

    Y-Chromosome Sickness: The Congo's "Silent War"

  • He was not a handsome man, having a protrusive nose, high cheek-bones, and long upper lip; but there was a manliness about his face which redeemed it.

    The Duke's Children

  • His beard went all round under his chin, and was clipped into the appearance of a stiff thick hedge — equally thick, and equally broad, and equally protrusive at all parts.

    John Caldigate

  • Nature is 'sheep's wool on barbed wire,' equipment such as a harrow pin, sledge-head, or trowel, as if its center were protrusive objects and not recessive vistas.

    Heaney Agonistes

  • To return to it: his eyes are a clear blue-gray, frank and straightforward in their look; his nose a finely chiselled aquiline; his mouth exceedingly firm, and fortified in that expression by a chin almost as protrusive beyond the rest of the profile as Charlotte Cushman's, though less noticeably so, being longer than hers; and he wears a narrow ribbon of brown beard, meeting under the chin.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 13, No. 78, April, 1864

  • A vast field of aerial ice -- it is inert to this earth's gravitation -- but by universal flux and variation, part of it sags closer to this earth, and is susceptible to gravitation -- by cohesion with the main mass, this part does not fall, but water melting from it does fall, and forms icicles -- then, by various disturbances, this part sometimes falls in fragments that are protrusive with icicles.

    The Book of the Damned

  • Disposition of the Air is such, as that these Clouds cannot rise therein, either from their own Weight, the want of a protrusive Force, or from the falling of the Wind, which in cloudy Weather is always a

    The Shepherd of Banbury's Rules to Judge of the Changes of the Weather, Grounded on Forty Years' Experience

  • WHEN Mists are very, heavy in themselves, and rise only by the Action of that protrusive Force, exerted by the subterranean Fire, they can rise no higher than where the Gravitation becomes superior to that protrusive force, for then they descend again by their own Weight, and this occasions the Appearance mentioned in the Observation of their hanging upon Hill-tops, where they are very soon condensed, and fall down in Rain.

    The Shepherd of Banbury's Rules to Judge of the Changes of the Weather, Grounded on Forty Years' Experience

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