Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. That form of delusion which leads to extravagant and absurd undertakings or sacrifices in obedience to a morbidly romantic ideal of duty or honor, as illustrated by the exploits of Don Quixote in knight-errantry.
  • n. Quixotry.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. That form of delusion which leads to extravagant and absurd undertakings or sacrifices in obedience to a morbidly romantic ideal of duty or honor, as illustrated by the exploits of Don Quixote in knight-errantry. See quixotic.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Quixotic extravagance in notions, actions, or undertakings; pursuit of absurdly romantic enterprises; uncalled-for or useless chivalry or magnanimity.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. quixotic (romantic and impractical) behavior

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • His name was Graves, and he regarded what he called the judge's "quixotism" with condescending good-nature.

    The Voice of the People

  • Some critics have called Jones’ quests “quixotic”—but speaking to Jones, one gets the impression he takes certain issues to heart and refuses to let them go, quixotism be damned.

    Project On Government Oversight: Osprey Odyssey: Rep. Jones' Ten-Year Quest to Clear the Names of Two Marine Corps Pilots

  • As the only moral criterion which we recognize is that of social utility, the public disavowal of one's conviction in order to remain in the Party's ranks is obviously more honourable than the quixotism of carrying on a hopeless struggle.

    Autumn

  • In other words, Burke was quite ready to anticipate, or to meet, any charge of quixotism.

    Reactionary Prophet

  • I have also had to pay through the nose 175 dollars for my quixotism — a sum which I cannot very well afford.

    The American Senator

  • Though he was by that time pretty well cured of his military quixotism, he would not totally decline the generous proffer, for which he thanked him in the most grateful terms, telling the general that he would pay his duty to him on his return from France, and then, if he could determine upon re-engaging in the army, should think himself highly honoured in being under his command.

    The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle

  • It is difficult to recognize either the wisdom or necessity of this quixotism and nonchalant acceptance of a fate which, until they themselves made the decision, had been by no means certain: but it is impossible not to admire their selfless gallantry.

    The Lonely Sea

  • Here shame over our error often makes us continue the fight for a long time, with a wholly groundless and strenuous expenditure of energies, but with all the greater bitterness against our opponent who forces us into this quixotism.

    Conflict and The Web of Group-Affiliations

  • If, as Pacheco reports, Luis de Leon was the most taciturn of men, he was chivalrous to the point of quixotism.

    Fray Luis de León A Biographical Fragment

  • But Philip was off somewhere, gone out of his life this many a day in a characteristic burst of quixotism.

    Diane of the Green Van

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