Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Obsolete spelling of rodomontade.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. See rodomontade.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See rodomontade.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. vain and empty boasting

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • 'It's what I call the rhodomontade of independence,' said Hugh.

    He Knew He Was Right

  • ‘It’s what I call the rhodomontade of independence,’ said Hugh.

    He Knew He Was Right

  • In fact, the good squire was a little too apt to indulge that kind of pleasantry which is generally called rhodomontade: but which may, with as much propriety, be expressed by a much shorter word; and perhaps we too often supply the use of this little monosyllable by others; since very much of what frequently passes in the world for wit and humour, should, in the strictest purity of language, receive that short appellation, which, in conformity to the well-bred laws of custom, I here suppress.

    The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling

  • In fact, the good squire was a little too apt to indulge that kind of pleasantry which is generally called rhodomontade: but which may, with as much propriety, be expressed by a much shorter word; and perhaps we too often supply the use of this little monosyllable by others; since very much of what frequently passes in the world for wit and humour, should, in the strictest purity of language, receive that short appellation, which, in conformity to the wellbred laws of custom, I here suppress.

    XI. The Narrow Escape of Molly Seagrim. Book IV

  • Above all, the highest spirit in the world changes only too easily at the first check into depression, and one might say into a kind of rhodomontade of alarm, the

    On War — Volume 1

  • This kind of rhodomontade is very finely expressed in English by the word puff, which in its literal sense, signifies a blowing, or violent gust of wind, and in the metaphorical sense, a boasting or bragging.

    Travels in England in 1782

  • "rhodomontade" in which she then bewildered herself, and imitating her terror when he threatened to run upstairs and ask Mr. Blyth if Madonna really had a hair bracelet, with such amazing accuracy and humor, as made Mat declare that what he had just beheld for nothing, would cure him of ever paying money again to see any regular play-acting as long as he lived.

    Hide and Seek

  • This singular rhodomontade is enclosed in a letter to a friend of Rob

    Rob Roy

  • Let your extemporaneous descantings and unpremeditated expatiations have intelligibility and veracious vivacity, without rhodomontade or thrasonical bombast.

    December 7th, 2005

  • “But did you ever see Foxley since you came to this country?” now enquired McCoy, having been prompted to ask this ingenious gentleman the question by the real Simon Pure, who in fact appeared much to enjoy the rhodomontade of his Irish relation.

    Ralph Rashleigh

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Comments

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  • If I had been master of ever so little experience, I should not have been the dupe of his rhodomontade.

    - Lesage, The Adventures of Gil Blas of Santillane, tr. Smollett, bk 1 ch. 2

    September 12, 2008

  • Allow me a little rhodomontade, Jack!...

    Lovelace to Belford, Clarissa by Samuel Richardson

    December 4, 2007

  • This seems to be a spelling variant of rodomontade. The added 'h' is hard to justify, as it suggests a false etymological link to the Greek morpheme rhod, meaning rose-colored.

    December 2, 2007