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  • The beasts have convened to debate:

    Should jackal or louse bear the weight,

    Or lizard take blame

    Sparing others the shame

    That Donald and they be connate.

    January 18, 2019

  • carburetor

    January 17, 2019

  • alogical?

    January 17, 2019

  • One weather chat characteristic

    Is rather a linguistic missed trick:

    Why rain dogs and cats

    Not pigeons and bats,

    A figure more aptly faunistic?

    January 17, 2019

  • No.

    January 17, 2019

  • *looks sideways at jean dimmock*

    January 17, 2019

  • Laurtal Yanni

    January 16, 2019

  • Mottled tarmac.

    January 16, 2019

  • Doomed cromlech

    January 16, 2019

  • Cy Twombly

    January 16, 2019

  • His voice and his pictures surround,

    Like a pair of assailants they pound.

    They stab and they wound

    And leave us in stound

    Then kick us when we’re on the ground.

    January 16, 2019

  • toum batch

    January 16, 2019

  • "A heavy low carriage mounted on three wheels, the forward wheel being pivoted to facilitate changes of direction: used for transporting cannon and ammunition within the galleries of permanent works."

    --from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    January 15, 2019

  • "The play between the spindle of the De Bange gas-cheek and its cavity in the breech-screw: it is expressed in decimal parts of an inch, and is measured by the difference between the diameters of the spindle and its cavity."

    --from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    January 15, 2019

  • Spotted as a form of doggo speak on twitter

    Also ducc

    January 15, 2019

  • Also see fomes.

    January 15, 2019

  • emetic ipecac

    January 15, 2019

  • textspeak for 'what do you mean'

    January 15, 2019

  • Could a name for “enforcer of law” be

    More cozy than plain British “bobby?”

    See “peeler” that was

    Supplanted because

    The cockneys considered it nobby.

    January 15, 2019

  • Thumb thwack

    January 15, 2019

  • bum tack

    January 15, 2019

  • rampant poppycock

    January 14, 2019

  • Montserrat Caballé.

    January 14, 2019

  • Carpal dog snot

    January 14, 2019

  • larval COM port

    January 14, 2019

  • Portal tomcat.

    January 14, 2019

  • Vorpal wombat

    January 14, 2019

  • Mortal Compote

    January 14, 2019

  • Forsooth.

    January 14, 2019

  • I’ve rhymed my long weary way

    Five years without missing a day.

    Now rest on nostalgia

    Or choose cephalalgia,

    The price the obsessive must pay?

    January 14, 2019

  • Strewth!

    January 14, 2019

  • Spotted as a marketing term for a computer desk setup for gaming

    Also, Star Wars

    January 14, 2019

  • "Then again she liked the idea of herself up in the air with her compound eyes, hovering, havering, gathering data."

    Crudo by Olivia Laing, p 10

    January 13, 2019

  • High sentiments can’t hide the truth

    That much of our lives is uncouth.

    We desperately muddle

    And struggle to huddle

    Like penguins in search of some lewth.

    January 13, 2019

  • Mortal tombac.

    January 12, 2019

  • ""We're not hurting anyone," Beth said, still rocking, but with a new composure, her lips wiped, her eyes miotic, blue."

    "Show Recent Some Love" by Sam Lipsyte, p 65 of the November 19, 2018 issues of the New Yorker

    January 12, 2019

  • Old Icelandic: To get a scratch, to get a slight wound

    January 12, 2019

  • Reality’s under attack,

    Each speech a stinging gob smack.

    His gilt is amazin’;

    It seems as if brazen

    But even his brass is tombac.

    January 12, 2019

  • snarky comment left under full stack

    January 12, 2019

  • full stack developer.

    In myth, it's someone who knows everything from the bare metal to the application level.

    January 12, 2019

  • gaming shortening for elimination

    January 12, 2019

  • gaming short version of eliminations

    January 12, 2019

  • Both cloud computing and fog computing provide storage, applications, and data to end-users. However, fog computing has a closer proximity to end-users and bigger geographical distribution.23

    Cloud Computing – the practice of using a network of remote servers hosted on the Internet to store, manage, and process data, rather than a local server or a personal computer.24 Cloud Computing can be a heavyweight and dense form of computing power.citation needed

    Fog computing – a term created by Cisco that refers to extending cloud computing to the edge of an enterprise's network. Also known as Edge Computing or fogging, fog computing facilitates the operation of compute, storage, and networking services between end devices and cloud computing data centers. While edge computing is typically referred to the location where services are instantiated, fog computing implies distribution of the communication, computation, and storage resources and services on or close to devices and systems in the control of end-users.2526 Fog computing is a medium weight and intermediate level of computing power27. Rather than a substitute, fog computing often serves as a complement to cloud computing.28

    Mist computing – a lightweight and rudimentarycitation needed form of computing power that resides directly within the network fabric at the extreme edge of the network fabric using microcomputers and microcontrollers to feed into Fog Computing nodes and potentially onward towards the Cloud Computing platforms.29

    National Institute of Standards and Technology in March, 2018 released a definition of the Fog computing adopting much of Cisco's commercial terminology as NIST Special Publication 500-325, Fog Computing Conceptual Model that defines Fog computing as an horizontal, physical or virtual resource paradigm that resides between smart end-devices and traditional cloud computing or data center. This paradigm supports vertically-isolated, latency-sensitive applications by providing ubiquitous, scalable, layered, federated, and distributed computing, storage, and network connectivity. Thus Fog Computing is most distinguished by distance from the Edge. Fog Computing is physically and functionally intermediate between Edge nodes and centralized Clouds. Much of the terminology is not defined including key architectural terms like "smart" and the distinction between Fog Computing from Edge Computing does not have generally agreed acceptance.

    Fog Computing, Wikipedia (visited Jan. 11, 2019

    Fog computing is a term for an alternative to cloud computing that puts some kinds of transactions and resources at the edge of a network, rather than establishing channels for cloud storage and utilization. Proponents of fog computing argue that it can reduce the need for bandwidth by not sending every bit of information over cloud channels, and instead aggregating it at certain access points, such as routers. This allows for a more strategic compilation of data that may not be needed in cloud storage right away, if at all. By using this kind of distributed strategy, project managers can lower costs and improve efficiencies.
    Fox Computing, Technopedia (visited Jan. 11, 2019)

    January 12, 2019

  • Femtocell, Wikipedia

    Femtocell, Technopedia

    January 12, 2019

  • In Glasgow, the underground is known as the 'clockwork orange.'

    https://visit-glasgow.info/history-and-people/glasgow%E2%80%99s-clockwork-orange/

    January 11, 2019

  • From cold northern seas to the Tasman,

    And islands perfumed with sweet jasmine,

    O’er endless bleak fetches

    The transported wretches

    Survived on slim hope and coarse maslin.

    January 11, 2019

  • spotted again as restaurant reservations.

    The twitter examples also have it being a shortening of Resolutions (computer plus new year's)

    January 11, 2019

  • "Lenoks (otherwise known as Asiatic trout or Manchurian trout) are a genus, Brachymystax, of salmonid fishes native to rivers and lakes in Mongolia, Kazakhstan, wider Siberia (Russia), Northern China, and Korea."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Lenok&oldid=853445221

    January 10, 2019

  • Dude.

    January 10, 2019

  • Anyone have a mellophone I can borrow?

    January 10, 2019

  • Seconded.

    January 10, 2019

  • An infant who’s fierce for the nipple

    Once grown may be given to tipple

    And if so accursed

    Must manage his thirst,

    Not guzzle but daintily sipple.

    January 10, 2019

  • Good idea ashok.

    January 10, 2019

  • Only for hobby

    January 10, 2019

  • re my previous comment: in the example from Dunham's book, the word amel seems to be used metaphorically, as a synonym for lustre, or sheen, rather than referring specifically to enamel.

    January 10, 2019

  • None of the examples given actually relate to the English word amel, so, here is a relevant example. "Swafurlam admired his sword and its splendid accoutrements, the curious richness of the workmanship, the yellow gloss of the gold, the blue amel of the steel, the straps of scarlet leather, and the buckle studded with precious stones."

    From: A History of Europe During the Middle Ages, Volume 2, Samuel Astley Dunham, 1833, page 319.

    January 10, 2019

  • That's cool, man. Pas de problemo.

    January 9, 2019

  • Sorry, due to government shutdown all visitors, limericks, cats and jazzbears must leave the park.

    January 9, 2019

  • I'm Brazilian and learning about api

    January 9, 2019

  • Though legal, leave pot well alone;

    It made my backyard Yellowstone.

    There Old Faithful spat

    And frightened the cat

    While a bear played a fine mellophone.

    January 9, 2019

  • Nope, not explaining.

    January 8, 2019

  • French: "as far as the eye can see"; within sightline

    January 8, 2019

  • There once was a youth in Australia

    Who slept in odd paraphernalia -

    Wore armor to bed,

    To cushion his head

    A pillow was stuffed in his galea.

    January 9, 2019

  • spotted as an old version electric car, or an electric car which is inefficient.

    January 8, 2019

  • Best use of nates so far in 2019.

    January 8, 2019

  • The Dutch have odd habits, by Jove!

    And sooterkin shows us a trove:

    Just why should Dutch ladies

    Be toasting their nates

    Or want to sit over a stove?

    January 7, 2019

  • In 2018, this was commonly used as the SHOUT 👏🏽 CLAP

    Where a phrase was to be read as if it were in all caps with a tempo.

    As in

    NEXT 👏🏽 YEAR 👏🏽 👏🏽 👏🏽 WILL 👏🏽 BE 👏🏽 EMOJI 👏🏽 OF 👏🏽 THE 👏🏽 YEAR

    January 6, 2019

  • corn-on-the-cob

    January 6, 2019

  • turkey

    January 6, 2019

  • Some credit strange creatures from space

    Or think that a ghost haunts the place

    But don’t often see

    The theophany

    Made plain in a babe’s smiling face.

    January 6, 2019

  • I originally subscribed to Wordnik quite a while ago, but for at least the past year and a half stopped receiving your Word of the Day transmissions, though I hadn't canceled my subscription. Any idea what happened? In any event, I am herewith re-establishing contact.

    January 5, 2019

  • The suffering drones who are seen least

    Will say that their boss is a mean beast

    But turns a fine fellow

    When workers grow mellow

    At the annual company beanfeast.

    January 5, 2019

  • The poets of old made a song

    With anvil and hammer and tong,

    Now rap’s all the rage

    That’s stamped by a swage

    So writers need never be strong.

    January 4, 2019

  • Coquitlam BC has a neighbourhood called Harbour Chines

    January 3, 2019

  • check out best and funny wifi names on https://funnywifi.name

    January 3, 2019

  • The barbering tar would opine,

    “The hardest to shave’s the jawline.

    The prow of the chin

    Is easy as sin

    But not the damned barnacled chine.”

    January 3, 2019

  • Yes We Have No Bananas (1923) is now in the public domain! I'm surprised nobody seems to be celebrating.

    January 3, 2019

  • word smith :)

    January 2, 2019

  • In computer gaming it is Limited Time Mode

    January 2, 2019

  • See ferial, which means pertaining to a holiday or pertaining to any day of the week which is not a holiday.

    January 2, 2019

  • The day of the week’s immaterial

    Official, mundane, or ethereal.

    You’re sure to be vexed

    Without some context

    When told the occasion is ferial.

    Ferial is one of those words that supports opposite meanings. There are at least three lists that try (more or less strictly) to collect these:

    autantonyms, self-antonyms, contranyms.

    January 2, 2019

  • PR Newswire coined the term “Social Echo” to describe “the powerful reverberation around brands that occurs through the millions of conversations in the social networks and communities where people gather today.”

    In PR Newswire’s view, “A brand’s Social Echo has enormous power to shape reputation, influence mass opinion and drive growth. Social Echo has equal – and perhaps even greater – power to stop a brand dead in its tracks.”

    They go on to say that…

    “Marketers and communicators who understand this are actively engaged in listening to their Social Echo and in finding ways to participate in the conversations that comprise their Social Echo. Importantly, they are also gleaning real-time insights to apply back to their brands in every area – customer care, product development, brand positioning and messaging, innovation and more.

    Read more at https://www.business2community.com/social-media/how-is-your-social-echo-0453783

    January 2, 2019

  • Spotted emoji phrase for teatime

    January 1, 2019

  • It may be all rumor and hearsay

    But true in a chillingly weird way:

    The Kremlin’s thick walls

    Hide banquets and balls

    On Donald’s inaugural year-day.

    January 1, 2019

  • dropshipper, n.

    The New York Times, 27 November 2018:

    Dropshippers are online sellers who don’t keep any products in stock. Instead, they advertise a product and, if it is purchased, they buy the item from overseas and ship it directly to the customer.

    December 31, 2018

  • dropshipping, n.

    The New York Times, 27 November 2018:

    As it happens, uncanny ecommerce is a passion of mine, which is why my student mentioned the packages, and why I suspected that whoever was behind these retailers was doing something like “dropshipping,” just taken up a notch.

    December 31, 2018

  • post-millennial, n.

    Mike Brown, 20 November 2018:

    And suddenly your cute adorable son is a long-haired, teenage, post-millennial.

    December 31, 2018

  • Slack strike, n.

    Slate Union, 16 November 2018:

    THREAD: 1/ Today, Slate’s union is conducting an hour-long Slack strike to express our unity and commitment to what we’re asking for at the table. We feel these asks are essential to the wellbeing of our workplace.

    December 31, 2018

  • greyware, n.

    The Register, 10 November 2018:

    Researchers with Cisco Talos report that a number of knock-off apps claiming to be Telegram or Instagram clients are circulating within the country. Classified as "greyware", the apps aren't outright malicious, just extremely stalkery, collecting device and user information then sending that data to servers within Iran.

    December 31, 2018

  • funbux, n.

    The Register, 10 November 2018:

    When the feds refused to help the young man out with his request, the kid made the perfectly rational decision to lash out by making 50 separate threats blow up the Miami International Airport. His plan sort of worked, in that it finally got the attention of the FBI, but rather than send a team of agents to track down the young man's funbux, they instead arrested him.

    December 31, 2018

  • e-gentrification, n.

    The New York Times, 8 November 2018:

    Some insist that e-carceration is “a step in the right direction.” But where are we going with this? A growing number of scholars and activists predict that “e-gentrification” is where we’re headed as entire communities become trapped in digital prisons that keep them locked out of neighborhoods where jobs and opportunity can be found.

    December 31, 2018

  • e-carceration, n.

    The New York Times, 8 November 2018:

    Some insist that e-carceration is “a step in the right direction.” But where are we going with this? A growing number of scholars and activists predict that “e-gentrification” is where we’re headed as entire communities become trapped in digital prisons that keep them locked out of neighborhoods where jobs and opportunity can be found.

    December 31, 2018

  • logline, n.

    The Guardian, 30 October 2018:

    Goldman’s as-yet-untitled drama will take place thousands of years before Game of Thrones and “will chronicle the world’s descent from the golden Age of Heroes into its darkest hour”. An official logline from the network reads: “Only one thing is for sure: from the horrifying secrets of Westeros’ history to the true origin of the White Walkers, the mysteries of the East to the Starks of legend – it’s not the story we think we know.”

    December 31, 2018

  • anti-elite, adj.

    Pete Paphides, 21 October 2018:

    No BBC email trying to justify its platforming of Bannon can do so by using the word “anti-elite” – a term coined by alt-right disrupters with the specific purpose of cloaking dangerous ideas in populist language. Their goal, as Nicola Sturgeon says, is to normalise those ideas.

    December 31, 2018

  • ghost phone, n.

    The Register, 16 October 2018:

    The Palm brand has returned with a bizarre concept: a tiny touchscreen "ghost" phone that mirrors the contents of your real smartphone – and won’t do much without one.

    December 31, 2018

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