Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Subject to or dependent on a condition or conditions.
  • adjective Physically fit.
  • adjective Prepared for a specific action or process.
  • adjective Psychology Exhibiting or trained to exhibit a conditioned response.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Being in a certain state or having certain qualities, or a certain constitution, temperament, temper, etc.; circumstanced; constituted: most frequently used in composition: as, well-conditioned; ill-conditioned.
  • Existing under or subject to conditions; limited by conditions; dependent.
  • In metaphysics, placed or cognized under conditions or relations; relative.
  • noun In metaphysics, collectively, the universe as existing and known under conditions or limits: always with the definite article: opposed to the unconditioned or absolute.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Surrounded; circumstanced; in a certain state or condition, as of property or health.
  • adjective Having, or known under or by, conditions or relations; not independent; not absolute.
  • adjective made softer by washing with a chemical agent called a conditioner{3}.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Simple past tense and past participle of condition.
  • adjective determined or dependent on some condition
  • adjective physically fit, especially as the result of exercise
  • adjective prepared for a specific use
  • adjective psychology exhibiting a conditioned reflex

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective established by conditioning or learning
  • adjective physically fit

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In his book The End of Overeating, former FDA commissioner Dr. David Kessler examines the role of the brain in eating behavior and the mechanisms involved in what he calls conditioned hypereating.

    Darya Pino: Learning to Eat Less: How Understanding Your Brain Can Make You Healthier

  • I guess I got what you call conditioned at the Barrowland.

    Shadow Games

  • Much of this behavior, which he calls conditioned hyper-eating, is due to brain pathways that are established and reinforced by the regular consumption of highly appealing high-fat, high-sugar, salty foods.

    CNN.com

  • Even for people that are healthy weight, food activates the neural circuits of their brains, and they have this conditioned and driven behavior we call conditioned hypereating.

    Louise McCready: Dr. David Kessler, author of The End of Overeating, On Why We Can't Stop Eating

  • Its called conditioned response and it works with humans as well as dogs.

    Extreme Measures

  • This should not be expressed in the terms conditioned by Jewish history and Greek metaphysics, ie to claim that Jesus is the Son of God, as that situates the kerygma in an abandoned cultural context, but perhaps a re-interpretation of Logos theology, concentrating on Jesus as the purpose of God revealed in human form, would be more easily digestible today.

    Has Spirituality changed since Newton?

  • The fear reaction is known as a conditioned response: the rat has an unconditioned, innate fear of shocks, and it can be conditioned to be afraid of tones if the two are associated with each other.

    Mind Wide Open

  • The fear reaction is known as a conditioned response: the rat has an unconditioned, innate fear of shocks, and it can be conditioned to be afraid of tones if the two are associated with each other.

    Mind Wide Open

  • The fear reaction is known as a conditioned response: the rat has an unconditioned, innate fear of shocks, and it can be conditioned to be afraid of tones if the two are associated with each other.

    Mind Wide Open

  • The fear reaction is known as a conditioned response: the rat has an unconditioned, innate fear of shocks, and it can be conditioned to be afraid of tones if the two are associated with each other.

    Mind Wide Open

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