Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Any of various perennial plants of the genus Taraxacum of the composite family, having many-rayed yellow flower heads and deeply notched basal leaves, especially T. officinale, native to Eurasia and naturalized as a weed in North America, having edible leaves and flower heads that can be used to make wine.
  • noun A brilliant to vivid yellow.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A well-known plant, Taraxacum officinale, natural order Compositæ, having a naked fistulous scape with one large bright-yellow flower, and a tapering, milky, perennial root.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Bot.) A well-known plant of the genus Taraxacum (Taraxacum officinale, formerly called Taraxacum Dens-leonis and Leontodos Taraxacum) bearing large, yellow, compound flowers, and deeply notched leaves.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun countable Any of the several species of plant in the genus Taraxacum, characterised yellow flower heads and notched, broad-ended leaves, especially the common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale).
  • noun countable The flower head or fruiting head of the dandelion plant.
  • noun uncountable A yellow colour, like that of the flower.
  • adjective Of a yellow colour, like that of the flower.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun any of several herbs of the genus Taraxacum having long tap roots and deeply notched leaves and bright yellow flowers followed by fluffy seed balls

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English dent-de-lioun, from Old French dentdelion, from Medieval Latin dēns leōnis, lion's tooth (from its sharply indented leaves) : Latin dēns, dent-, tooth; see dent- in Indo-European roots + Latin leōnis, genitive of leō, lion; see lion.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From French dent-de-lion ("lion's tooth"), also in Late Latin dēns leōnis. The term has since died out in French (except in Swiss French), but compare Spanish diente de león, Italian dente di leone, Norwegian løvetann, Portuguese dente-de-leão, and also German Löwenzahn, all having the same literal meaning.

Examples

  • At the time, we thought the yellow flowers were trash, but the white ones, which we called dandelion ghosts, were different because they granted wishes.

    Dandelion Ghosts

  • Now, imagine that dandelion is trying to sprout feathers.

    Chicken Update

  • The dandelion is one of the most common weeds in gardens and countryside, and today here on Freshome we wanted to present you an interesting and creative example of wall decal inspired by dandelion seeds being blown.

    70 Inch Tall Tree Vinyl Wall Decal

  • The word dandelion, after all, comes from dent de lion, tooth of the lion, after the jagged leaves.

    Groundwork: Winter (a)musings

  • Now, imagine that dandelion is trying to sprout feathers.

    Archive 2009-04-01

  • If you call a dandelion a weed versus of flower, it will vary what you do with it.

    Dr. Susan Albers: A Week Without the "F" Word: 5 Ways to End Fat Talk

  • Experience taught me that the root of the dandelion is not so good when applied to this purpose in the spring as it is in the fall.

    Roughing It in the Bush

  • Case turned to Joseph, who’d just picked a dandelion from the grass and was holding it against his nose to combat the odor.

    Missionaries

  • Case turned to Joseph, who’d just picked a dandelion from the grass and was holding it against his nose to combat the odor.

    Missionaries

  • Case turned to Joseph, who’d just picked a dandelion from the grass and was holding it against his nose to combat the odor.

    Missionaries

Comments

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