Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To omit or slur over (a syllable, for example) in pronunciation.
  • transitive v. To strike out (something written).
  • transitive v. To eliminate or leave out of consideration.
  • transitive v. To cut short; abridge.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To break or dash in pieces; to demolish.
  • v. To cut off, as a vowel or a syllable, usually the final one.
  • v. To distract from or evade (a question or line of argument)
  • v. To leave out or omit (something)

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To break or dash in pieces; to demolish.
  • transitive v. To cut off, as a vowel or a syllable, usually the final one; to subject to elision.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To break or dash in pieces; crush.
  • In grammar, to suppress or slur over the sound of in speech, or note the suppression of in writing: technically applied especially to the cutting off of a final vowel, as in “th' enemy,” but in a more general sense to that of a syllable or any part of a word. See elision, 1.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. leave or strike out

Etymologies

Latin ēlīdere, to strike out : ē-, ex-, ex- + laedere, to strike.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

Comments

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  • What a superb thesis. The author is right; Orwell and Waugh were very much alike. Really if you read them both, you read England in the first half of the C20.

    August 31, 2008

  • "Dissimilar though their causes may have been, Orwell and Waugh were both anchored by “a hatred of moral relativism”; that, Lebedoff claims, is what set the two men apart from their contemporaries. Yet in stressing this similarity, the author elides a deeper difference."

    The New York Times, Two of a Kind, by Jim Holt, August 29, 2008

    August 31, 2008

  • one of the best words in english.

    December 6, 2006