Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The partially dried fruit of any of several varieties of the common plum, Prunus domestica.
  • n. Any kind of plum that can be dried without spoiling.
  • n. Slang An ill-tempered, stupid, or incompetent person.
  • intransitive v. Slang To make a facial expression exhibiting ill temper or disgust: "Their faces prune at the slightest provocation” ( James Wolcott).
  • transitive v. To cut off or remove dead or living parts or branches of (a plant, for example) to improve shape or growth.
  • transitive v. To remove or cut out as superfluous.
  • transitive v. To reduce: prune a budget.
  • intransitive v. To remove what is superfluous or undesirable.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A plum.
  • n. The dried, wrinkled fruit of certain species of plum.
  • n. An old woman, especially a wrinkly one.
  • v. To remove excess material from a tree or shrub; to trim, especially to make more healthy or productive.
  • v. To cut down or shorten (by the removal of unnecessary material); as, to prune a budget.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A plum; esp., a dried plum, used in cookery
  • intransitive v. To dress; to prink; -used humorously or in contempt.
  • transitive v. To lop or cut off the superfluous parts, branches, or shoots of; to clear of useless material; to shape or smooth by trimming; to trim: as, to prune trees; to prune an essay.
  • transitive v. To cut off or cut out, as useless parts.
  • transitive v. To preen; to prepare; to dress.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To lop superfluous twigs or branches from (a vine, bush, or tree); trim with a knife.
  • To lop off as superfluous or injurious; remove by cutting.
  • To clear from anything superfluous: remove what is superfluous or objectionable from.
  • To dress or trim, as birds their feathers; preen: also used figuratively.
  • To lop off superfluous twigs or branches, as from a vine, bush, or tree.
  • To arrange or dress the feathers with the bill: said of birds, and also used figuratively.
  • n. A plum; in recent usage (especially in the western United States), a plum-suitable to be dried as a prune.
  • n. The dried fruit of one of several varieties of the common plum-tree.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. dried plum
  • v. weed out unwanted or unnecessary things
  • v. cultivate, tend, and cut back the growth of

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *prūna, from Latin prūnum, plum.
Middle English prouinen, from Old French proignier, perhaps from Vulgar Latin *prōretundiāre : Latin prō-, in front; see pro-1 + Latin rotundus, round (from rota, wheel; see ret- in Indo-European roots).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old French prune, from Latin prūnum, from Ancient Greek προῦνον (prounon), variant of προῦμνον (proumnon, "plum").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old French proignier ("to trim the feathers with the beak"), earlier prooignier, ultimately from Latin pro- ("front") + rotundus ("round") 'to round-off the front'.

Examples

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