Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The expectoration of blood or of blood-streaked sputum from the larynx, trachea, bronchi, or lungs.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In pathology, spitting of blood: usually restricted to the raising of blood from the lungs. Also hæmoptoë.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Med.) The expectoration of blood, due usually to hemorrhage from the mucous membrane of the lungs.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun medicine expectoration (coughing up) of blood

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun coughing up blood from the respiratory tract; usually indicates a severe infection of the bronchi or lungs

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[hemo– + Greek ptusis, a spitting (from ptuein, to spit).]

Examples

  • Dense, crunchy, intended for medical professionals (I learned two new words -- "cachectic" and "hemoptysis" -- and my medical Latin is pretty darned good for a non-doctor), and full of the usual assortment of incredibly gross but illustrative scene photos.

    you got to lift up every stone now sister

  • Mesothelioma that affects the pleura can cause these signs and symptoms: chest wall pain pleural effusion, or fluid surrounding the lung shortness of breath fatigue or anemia wheezing, hoarseness, or cough blood in the sputum (fluid) coughed up hemoptysis

    Balkinization

  • Mesothelioma that affects the pleura can cause these signs and symptoms: chest wall pain pleural effusion, or fluid surrounding the lung shortness of breath fatigue or anemia wheezing, hoarseness, or cough blood in the sputum (fluid) coughed up hemoptysis

    Balkinization

  • Mesothelioma that affects the pleura can cause these signs and symptoms: chest wall pain pleural effusion, or fluid surrounding the lung shortness of breath fatigue or anemia wheezing, hoarseness, or cough blood in the sputum (fluid) coughed up hemoptysis

    Balkinization

  • Mesothelioma that affects the pleura can cause these signs and symptoms: chest wall pain pleural effusion, or fluid surrounding the lung shortness of breath fatigue or anemia wheezing, hoarseness, or cough blood in the sputum (fluid) coughed up hemoptysis

    Balkinization

  • Mesothelioma that affects the pleura can cause these signs and symptoms: chest wall pain pleural effusion, or fluid surrounding the lung shortness of breath fatigue or anemia wheezing, hoarseness, or cough blood in the sputum (fluid) coughed up hemoptysis

    Balkinization

  • Mesothelioma that affects the pleura can cause these signs and symptoms: chest wall pain pleural effusion, or fluid surrounding the lung shortness of breath fatigue or anemia wheezing, hoarseness, or cough blood in the sputum (fluid) coughed up hemoptysis

    Balkinization

  • Mesothelioma that affects the pleura can cause these signs and symptoms: chest wall pain pleural effusion, or fluid surrounding the lung shortness of breath fatigue or anemia wheezing, hoarseness, or cough blood in the sputum (fluid) coughed up hemoptysis

    Balkinization

  • Mesothelioma that affects the pleura can cause these signs and symptoms: chest wall pain pleural effusion, or fluid surrounding the lung shortness of breath fatigue or anemia wheezing, hoarseness, or cough blood in the sputum (fluid) coughed up hemoptysis

    Balkinization

  • Mesothelioma that affects the pleura can cause these signs and symptoms: chest wall pain pleural effusion, or fluid surrounding the lung shortness of breath fatigue or anemia wheezing, hoarseness, or cough blood in the sputum (fluid) coughed up hemoptysis

    Balkinization

Comments

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  • "An American pathologist noted: 'Fifty cases of subconjunctival hemorrhage bleeding from the lining of the eye were counted. Twelve had a true hemoptysis, bright red blood with no admixture of mucus....'"

    —John M. Barry, The Great Influenza (NY: Penguin Books, 2004), 237

    February 16, 2009

  • "The doctor took a stethoscope down from the wall, untangling the chestpiece from the connecting cord. "Any hemoptysis?"

    She shook her head."

    Doomsday Book by Connie Willis, p 90

    May 25, 2010