Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • transitive verb To give praise to; glorify. synonym: praise.
  • noun Praise; glorification.
  • noun A hymn or song of praise.
  • noun Ecclesiastical The service of prayers formerly following the matins and constituting with them the first of the seven canonical hours.
  • noun The time appointed for this service.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Praise; commendation; honorable mention.
  • noun That part of divine worship which consists in praise.
  • noun Music or a song in praise or honor of any one.
  • noun plural In the Roman Catholic Church, and in the Anglican Ch. as a monastic or devotional office, a religious service, forming, in combination with matins, the first of the seven canonical hours: so called from the reiterated ascriptions of praise to God in the last of the psalms (cxlviii., cxlix., cl.) which it contains. The usage in the Greek church is similar. See canonical hours, under canonical.
  • To praise in words; speak or sing in praise of; especially, to extol or praise highly: as, to laud one to the skies.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun High commendation; praise; honor; exaltation; glory.
  • noun A part of divine worship, consisting chiefly of praise; -- usually in the pl.
  • noun Music or singing in honor of any one.
  • intransitive verb To praise in words alone, or with words and singing; to celebrate; to extol.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun praise or glorification
  • noun hymn of praise
  • noun in plural a prayer service following matins
  • verb transitive, intransitive to praise, to glorify

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb praise, glorify, or honor

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English lauden, from Old French lauder, from Latin laudāre, from laus, laud-, praise.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old French lauder, from Latin laudō, from laus ("praise, glory, fame, renown").

Examples

  • If what we as a society generally laud is the end result of ambition, the movie is fascinating for laying bare the ugly and insecure process to such a polished end product.

    Elizabeth Nicholas: There Goes Your Social Life

  • If what we as a society generally laud is the end result of ambition, the movie is fascinating for laying bare the ugly and insecure process to such a polished end product.

    Elizabeth Nicholas: There Goes Your Social Life

  • If what we as a society generally laud is the end result of ambition, the movie is fascinating for laying bare the ugly and insecure process to such a polished end product.

    Elizabeth Nicholas: There Goes Your Social Life

  • The Span. ‘laud is larger and deeper than the guitar, and its seven strings are played upon with

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Together with these verses of Dante, Fra Angelico, while endeavouring to depict the dance of the blessed, may well have called to mind these verses of a sacred laud, which is said to be by Iacopone da Todi and

    Fra Angelico

  • After having sent one of M'laud's juniors up the hill with his tail on fire, the Senior Healer had evidently decided to teach his juniors about kestra-chern directly.

    The Black Gryphon

  • Poured hot oil an 'laud'num into it, an' kept a hot brick rolled up in flannel against it, but didn't do no good.

    The Miracle Man

  • This form, as we shall see, was the immediate outgrowth of the "laud," but one of its ancestors was the open-air performances.

    Some Forerunners of Italian Opera

  • The White House also joined in to "laud" the Senator for coming to Washington to help bailout the companies that put us in this mess in the first place.

    Joshing Politics

  • Razzies 'laud' 'Transformers' and Bullock photo: Public Domain/Petty Officer 1st Class Mark O'Donald

    WN.com - Articles related to The US-Israeli dispute is more comedy than reality

Comments

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  • Dual in reverse.

    July 22, 2007

  • all earth his words do summon

    leaps to laud such man's blood!

    from "Ode for Ted," by Sylvia Plath

    April 14, 2008