Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The greatness and dignity of a sovereign.
  • n. The sovereignty and power of God.
  • n. Supreme authority or power: the majesty of the law.
  • n. A royal personage.
  • n. Used with His, Her, or Your as a title and form of address for a sovereign.
  • n. Royal dignity of bearing or aspect; grandeur.
  • n. Stately splendor; magnificence, as of style or character: the Parthenon in all its majesty.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The quality of being impressive and great

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj.
  • n. The dignity and authority of sovereign power; quality or state which inspires awe or reverence; grandeur; exalted dignity, whether proceeding from rank, character, or bearing; imposing loftiness; stateliness; -- usually applied to the rank and dignity of sovereigns.
  • n. Hence, used with the possessive pronoun, the title of an emperor, king or queen; -- in this sense taking a plural.
  • n. Dignity; elevation of manner or style.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The greatness or grandeur of exalted rank or character, or of manner; imposing loftiness; stateliness; in general, the character of inspiring awe or reverence.
  • n. Royal state; royalty.
  • n. A title of address or dignity (commonly written with a capital) used in speaking to or of a ruling sovereign or his (or more rarely her) wedded consort: as, your Majesty or Majesties; their majesties the king and queen. By papal grant, the sovereigns of Spain bear the title of Catholic Majesty; those of Portugal, of Most Faithful Majesty; and the former kings of France had that of Most Christian Majesty.
  • n. [capitalized] In medieval art, etc., a symbolic representation of the first person of the Trinity, seated on a throne.
  • n. In medieval English usage, the canopy of a hearse: so called because generally adorned with the symbolic figure of God the Father, called the Majesty. See hearse.
  • n. In heraldry, a representation of an eagle as crowned with a regal crown and holding a scepter.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. impressiveness in scale or proportion

Etymologies

Middle English mageste, maieste, from Old French majeste, from Latin māiestās; see meg- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Middle English maieste, mageste, from Old French majesté, from Latin māiestās, derived from Proto-Indo-European *maǵ-yos- (“greater”), from *maǵ-, *meǵ- (“great”). See mega-. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Accepting their swords in surrender, the receiving officer said: "Your majesty is my prisoner."

    Max and Carlota

  • But although Lakeside is at 5000 'there will be nothing to remind you of the San Juans, either in majesty nor the temps.

    About Ajijic, food, music, people, and the "social life"

  • And this is that properly which in kings we call majesty, and which no doubt is a kind of shadow or portraiture of the divine authority drawn upon the looks and persons of princes, which makes them commanders of men's fears, and thereby capable of governing them in all their concerns.

    Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions. Vol. II.

  • They can only lavish a thick cream of adjectives -- 'dignity,' 'charm,' 'majesty' -- over the Windsor family in the hope that some of us are fooled.

    Johann Hari: Can We Finally Tell the Truth About Britain's Vile 'Queen Mother'?

  • The verbal correspondence here is only less decisive -- as regards the use of the word "majesty" -- than in the passages collated by Mr. Morley; while the thought corresponds as closely.

    Montaigne and Shakspere

  • "On my arrival here, from Leghorn, I received your lordship's letter of October 7, communicating to me the title his majesty had been graciously pleased to confer upon me; an honour, your lordship is pleased to say, the highest that has ever been conferred on an officer of my standing, who was not a commander in chief.

    The Life of the Right Honourable Horatio Lord Viscount Nelson, Volume 1

  • His majesty was the worst rider ever seen, and thought himself the best.

    A Child's History of England

  • Louis XI. was the first in France who was generally called majesty,

    A Philosophical Dictionary

  • “On my arrival here, from Leghorn, I received your lordship's letter of October 7, communicating to me the title his majesty had been graciously pleased to confer upon me; an honour, your lordship is pleased to say, the highest that has ever been conferred on an officer of my standing, who was not a commander in chief.

    The Life of the Right Honourable Horatio Lord Viscount Nelson

  • I said tactfully that her majesty was a marvel of patience, and loved her sister dearly.

    Flashman on the March

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.