Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Something inessential but conducive to pleasure and comfort.
  • n. Something expensive or hard to obtain.
  • n. Sumptuous living or surroundings: lives in luxury.
  • adj. Providing luxury: a luxury car.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. very wealthy and comfortable surroundings.
  • n. something desirable but expensive.
  • n. something very pleasant but not really needed in life.
  • adj. very expensive

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A free indulgence in costly food, dress, furniture, or anything expensive which gratifies the appetites or tastes.
  • n. Anything which pleases the senses, is not necessary for life, and is also costly, or difficult to obtain; an expensive rarity; Contrasted to necessity.
  • n. Lechery; lust.
  • n. Luxuriance; exuberance.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Luxuriance; exuberance of growth.
  • n. A free or extravagant indulgence in pleasure, as of the table; voluptuousness in the gratification of any appetite; also, the free expenditure of wealth for the gratification of one's own desires, as in costly dress and equipage.
  • n. That which is delightful to the senses, the feelings, etc.; especially, that which gratifies a nice and fastidious appetite or taste; a dainty: as, a house filled with luxuries; the luxuries of the table.
  • n. Exuberant enjoyment; complete gratification or satisfaction, either physical or intellectual.
  • n. Lust; lewd desire; lasciviousness; indulgence in lust.
  • n. Synonyms and Epicurism, effeminacy, sensuality, delicacy, gratification, pleasure, enjoyment, delight. See luxurious.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the quality possessed by something that is excessively expensive
  • n. wealth as evidenced by sumptuous living
  • n. something that is an indulgence rather than a necessity

Etymologies

Middle English luxurie, lust, from Old French, from Latin luxuria, excess, luxury, from luxus.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Middle English luxurie, from Old French luxurie, from Latin luxuria ("rankness, luxury"), from luxus ("extravagance, luxury"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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