Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Occurring or appearing again or repeatedly.
  • adj. Anatomy Turning in a reverse direction. Used of blood vessels and nerves.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Recurring time after time.
  • adj. non-transient.
  • adj. Running back toward its origin.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Returning from time to time; recurring.
  • adj. Running back toward its origin.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Recurring; returning from time to time; reappearing; repeated: as, recurrent pains of a disease.
  • In crystallography, noting a crystal which exhibits an oscillatory combination of two sets of planes. See oscillatory.
  • In anatomy, turned back in its course, and running in a direction the opposite of its former one: specifically noting the inferior laryngeal branch of the pneumogastric. See the following phrases.
  • In entomology, turning back toward the base: as, a recurrent process.
  • A branch which is more or less turned toward the base of the wing, in a direction contrary to the nervure from which it arises. Many of these recurrent nervures are distinguished.
  • A vein of the wing which, after running toward the apex, is bent or curved back toward the base, as in many Coleoptera.
  • The anterior, a larger branch, arising just behind the perforation of the Interosseous membrane, and anastomosing with the lower articular popliteal arteries.
  • The posterior, arising a little lower than the anterior (though they often have a common origin), and communicating with the inferior profunda, the anastomotic, and posterior interosseous recurrent.
  • n. Any recurrent nerve or artery.
  • In paleontology, reappearing without essential change in organic composition: used of faunas which reappear after their first disappearance from a given geological section, or of a species which thus returns after departure. The conception of recurrent faunas implies the fact of migration and temporary absence from a given geographical province with subsequent return thereto.
  • n. A recurrent verse.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. recurring again and again

Etymologies

From Latin recurrens (present participle of recurrere). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • With nose serrulated by continuous spasms, hair bristling in recurrent waves, tongue whipping out like a red snake and whipping back again, ears flattened down, eyes gleaming hatred, lips wrinkled back, and fangs exposed and dripping, he could compel a pause on the part of almost any assailant.

    The Outcast

  • This kind of internal loop is called a recurrent net see Figure 6.

    World Wide Mind

  • The world is endlessly re-mapped and re-named, with new rules and rulers in recurrent holocausts.

    Leanne Goebel: Colorado Councilman May Want to Explore Why Art "Turned Him On?"

  • And all the while the hair of his neck and shoulders bristled in recurrent waves of ferocity and wrath.

    CHAPTER XXIII

  • The hair on their backs and shoulders bristled in recurrent waves of anger, and the thin lips writhed and lifted into ugly wrinkles, exposing the flesh-tearing fangs, cruel and menacing.

    LI-WAN, THE FAIR

  • The wind, which had lulled after the rain, had risen in recurrent gusts to storm violence.

    CHAPTER XXVIII

  • Between these two accounts of the Kantian legacies of the aesthetic — or what one might call the Kantian insistence — Karen Swann discerns and examines a certain recurrent "shape" in Shelley's poetry, "a beautiful, slumbering human form" (1).

    Introduction: 'The Power is There': Romanticism as Aesthetic Insistence

  • He only learns in recurrent weariness and despair that he is not this, not that.

    The Perceptions of James Joyce

  • But to dismiss speculation despairingly as mass madness which descends the public in recurrent waves, and to insist that such mob folly is incurable, must remind one of the medievel attitude of despair toward the great plagues that then raged through Europe.

    Whirlwinds of Speculation

  • With nose serrulated by continuous spasms, hair bristling in recurrent waves, tongue whipping out like a red snake and whipping back again, ears flattened down, eyes gleaming hatred, lips wrinkled back, and fangs exposed and dripping, he could compel

    The Outcast

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