Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Representation of inanimate objects, such as flowers or fruit, in painting or photography.
  • n. A painting, picture, or photograph of inanimate objects.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. a work of art depicting an arrangement of inanimate objects
  • n. A pattern that does not change from one generation to the next.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. The class or style of painting which represents inanimate objects, as fruit, flowers, dead game, etc.
  • n. a type of painting in which inanimate objects such as flowers or fruit are represented.
  • n. the inanimate subject matter of a still life painting or photograph.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See still life, under still.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a painting of inanimate objects such as fruit or flowers

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • 'If she thinks the brewery can be saved - and to do that she will have to make her own independent assessment of the position - if she thinks there's still life in the corpse she'll set up a CVA.'

    To The Hilt

  • Memories are like a still life painted by ten different student artists: some will be blue-based; others red; some will be as stark as Picasso and others as rich as Rembrandt; some will be foreshortened and others distant.

    VANISHING ACTS

  • Barber, “I swear by thy beneficence that there is still life in this Gobbo Golightly!”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Our art teacher, Mr. Bunch, then set up a still life for us to draw with charcoal … and proceeded to spend the entire hour giving Derek one-on-one instruction, praising his “profound” and “innovative” techniques with the charcoal stick.

    Flirting with Disaster

  • André Félibien set the hierarchy in painting as ranging from the low of still life to the high of meaningful events (preface, Conférences de l'Académie Royale de

    Dictionary of the History of Ideas

  • Her tad too-studied glance said she’d arranged the still life for him — Loftis’ alibi — even though they couldn’t know who he was.

    The Big Nowhere

Comments

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  • So nice. Something we might all wish for, and much nicer than its Italian version "natura morta" (dead nature).

    December 20, 2007