Comments by tumbel

  • "Paper being a precious, albeit familiar, commodity, book binders often reused printed papers that were thrown away by publishers, to laminate or glue them together into a stiff, board-like cover for their books. Thus neglected works routinely disappeared to help the birth of others. The scarcity of materials created countless palimpsests—bibliophagous books swallowing their unlucky predecessors as illustrated by Geoffrey Day’s essay in this collection."

    June 28, 2014

  • The Tatler was originally printed on a very brown paper called “tobacco paper.” The Spectator was a whiter, half folio sheet (or foolscap) printed on both sides, the quality of which, however superior to the Tatler’s paper, must have left much to be desired.

    June 28, 2014

  • Addison elsewhere bemoans the fate of sound yet slovenly printed works. “We have already seen the Memoirs of Sir William Temple published in the same character and volume with the history of Tom Thumb, and the works of our greatest poets shrunk into penny books and garlands. For my own part, I expect to see my lucubrations printed on browner paper than they are at present . . ..”

    June 28, 2014

  • "A close-up of the arms on this sammelband demonstrates the practice—the central shield on both boards of the latter has been (fairly neatly) replaced."
    Sammelband (pl. Sammelbände), or sometimes nonce-volume, is a book comprising a number of separately printed works that are subsequently bound together.

    June 28, 2014

  • "Bookmarks or letters found within books may be considered as another form of palimpsest, as the bifolium bookmark has a noticeable effect on the reading experience of the book wherein it was inserted"

    June 28, 2014

  • "Most famously, Swiss physician turned entrepreneur Philippe Curtius (1737–1794) began his career by making anatomical models, but soon moved on to the more lucrative practice of displaying waxworks of notable French persons from both ends of the social spectrum, aristocrats and nobles on the one hand, and thieves and criminals on the other. The story of his famous “niece” (or possibly his daughter) Madame Tussaud (1761–1850) is well rehearsed: her earliest models are said to have been death masks of mutilated heads taken directly from the guillotine"

    June 28, 2014

  • this seems to be an adjective referring to an Old Wykehamist, which is a term used for a former pupils of Winchester College, in memory of the school's founder, William of Wykeham.
    "The volume was then acquired by the Reverend Peter Hall, the most indefatigable of collectors of wiccamical association copies and presented to the library in 1815 "

    June 28, 2014

  • "After Matilda’s death in 1115, there ensued a long struggle between popes and Holy Roman emperors for control of the margravate..."

    October 30, 2012

  • from a fashion textbook i am copyediting: "A lace galloon appliqué can be created from the repeat of your lace. A galloon is a cut-out motif trim from the main yardage. Galloons are often used as badges, collars, or trims on lingerie and evening apparel."

    October 6, 2012

  • "instead of having to repeatedly draw lace or other fine ornamentals like schiffli or passementarie trims, you can render them once, then define a brush." from a textbook on CAD for fashion design.

    October 6, 2012

  • "instead of having to repeatedly draw lace or other fine ornamentals like schiffli or passementarie trims, you can render them once, then define a brush." from a textbook on CAD for fashion design.

    October 6, 2012

  • this is in my TONY list, but it didn't appear in the mag; i just came across it in the dicker looking up something else at work.

    September 17, 2010

  • such a good synonym for small!

    April 5, 2010

  • Red offered English audiences the spectacle of a great artist rejecting American mammon... (David Cote, Theater)

    April 1, 2010

  • "Strahs and the actors are shitting us all the time with this clipped badinage..." TONY theater review

    March 20, 2010

  • ...the ngomi, a plucked lute made from a combinaton of wood or calabash and goatskin, used by griots in northwest Africa...

    March 19, 2010

  • ...the ngomi, a plucked lute made from a combinaton of wood or calabash and goatskin, used by griots in northwest Africa...

    March 19, 2010

  • a scrum of readings (theater)

    March 17, 2010

  • This delicate solid perfume boasts hints of lavender, lotus blossom and bergamot.
    Joya sphere perfumed lavaliere, $78, at Anthropologie, locations throughout the city; visit anthropologie.com --TONY Seek

    November 26, 2009

  • "he’ll provide plenty of reasons to remember in tonight’s improv klatch" -- TONY music listings

    November 26, 2009

  • what happens when a book has been translated from the italian and cognates have been used for the latinate words.

    February 17, 2009

  • plural of klezmer

    January 26, 2009

  • http://brunelleschi.imss.fi.it/museum/esim.asp?c=100012

    "The albarello (or alberello) is the oldest type of pharmacy jar, designed to contain dense, viscous substances. Most albarelli were cylinder-shaped with a wide opening. They were often tapered at the center for easier handling. In the earliest models, the lids consisted of parchment sheets, but later versions had ceramic lids, sometimes fitted with a knob and handles. The Near Eastern style raises the possibility that the albarello reached the West via the Arab invasion of the Mediterranean. But some experts see the albarello as an imitation of the bamboo packaging in which medicinal drugs were shipped from the Orient."

    October 11, 2008

  • as in "of or relating to Moses," not a design made of small pieces of stone or glass.

    October 3, 2008

  • in a review of the musical HAIR, the writer refers to "tonsorial kudzu."

    August 18, 2008

  • "...ancient instruments (the ramsinga, the oliphant, the Roman bugle, the lute, the rebec, the aeolian harp, Solomon's harp)..." p 108

    November 24, 2007

  • "...ancient instruments (the ramsinga, the oliphant, the Roman bugle, the lute, the rebec, the aeolian harp, Solomon's harp)..." p 108

    November 24, 2007

  • "...the fly agaric with its red cap flecked with white..." p 108

    November 24, 2007

  • "...with the victim hoisted and then dropped buttocks-first onto a cushion of whetted iron spikes..." p 108

    November 24, 2007

  • "They were deluxe magazines with a flowery, nouveau aesthetic and pages that looked illuminated, with illustrated margins and colorful Pre-Raphaelite images of pallid damsels in colloquy with knights of the Holy Grail." p 104

    November 24, 2007

  • nothing, or cows

    December 23, 2006