Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A small, round shield either carried or worn on the arm.
  • n. A means of protection; a defense: "has enjoyed a reputation as a shield and buckler for . . . the academic avant-garde” ( Donal Henahan).
  • transitive v. To shield; protect.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A kind of shield, of various shapes and sizes, worn on one of the arms (usually the left) for protecting the front of the body. In the sword and buckler play of the Middle Ages in England, the buckler was a small shield, used, not to cover the body, but to stop or parry blows.
  • n. A shield resembling the Roman scutum. In modern usage, a smaller variety of shield is usually implied by this term.
  • n. One of the large, bony, external plates found on many ganoid fishes.
  • n. The anterior segment of the shell of trilobites.
  • n. A block of wood or plate of iron made to fit a hawse hole, or the circular opening in a half-port, to prevent water from entering when the vessel pitches.
  • v. To shield; to defend.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A kind of shield, of various shapes and sizes, worn on one of the arms (usually the left) for protecting the front of the body.
  • n.
  • n. One of the large, bony, external plates found on many ganoid fishes.
  • n. The anterior segment of the shell of trilobites.
  • n. A block of wood or plate of iron made to fit a hawse hole, or the circular opening in a half-port, to prevent water from entering when the vessel pitches.
  • transitive v. To shield; to defend.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To be a buckler or shield to; support; defend.
  • n. A shield; specifically, a small shield intended to parry blows or thrusts, but not so large as to cover the body.
  • n. Nautical, a piece of wood fitted to stop the hawse-holes of a ship, to prevent the sea from coming in, or to stop the circular hole in a port-lid when the gun is run in. Hawse-bucklers are now made of iron.
  • n. The anterior segment of the carapace or shell of a trilobite.
  • n. A plate on the body or head of a fish; especially, a plate in front of the dorsal fin in various catfishes, or Nematognathi.
  • n. A stage of the molting American blue crab, Callinectes hastatus, when the shell has become nearly hard.
  • n. A piece of beef cut off from the sirloin.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. armor carried on the arm to intercept blows

Etymologies

Middle English bokeler, from Old French bouclier, from boucle, boss on a shield, from Latin buccula, diminutive of bucca, cheek.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old French boucler, bucler, from Vulgar Latin *bucculārius ("bossed"), from Latin buccula ("boss"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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  • "a piece of defensive armour, used by the ancients." (citation in Historical Military Terms list description)

    October 10, 2008