Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A two-masted fishing vessel, used by the Dutch.
  • n. A participant in dogging
  • n. A sort of stone, found in the mines with the true alum rock, chiefly of silica and iron.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A two-masted fishing vessel, used by the Dutch.
  • n. A sort of stone, found in the mines with the true alum rock, chiefly of silica and iron.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A Dutch fishing-vessel used in the North Sea, particularly in the cod- and herring-fisheries. It is rigged with two masts, and somewhat resembles a ketch.
  • n. A sandy and oölitic ironstone.
  • n. In lumbering, one who attaches the dogs or hooks to a log before it is steam-skidded.

Etymologies

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Examples

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  • A voyeur. More specifically, someone (almost always male) who stands around in the bushes on lover's lane to watch other people have sex in their cars.reference 1

    The Oxford English Dictionary suggests that those being watched are well aware of the activity and may even encourage doggers to participate. As yet outside of the gay community this is an almost exclusively British term.

    July 11, 2009

  • From OED: A two-masted fishing vessel with bluff bows, somewhat resembling a ketch, used in the North Sea deep sea fisheries: formerly applied to English craft as well as those of other nations, but now practically restricted to Dutch fishing vessels (though out of use in Holland itself). In the 17th and 18th centuries, doggers frequently acted as privateers.

    February 27, 2008

  • See also bilander for another usage note.

    February 27, 2008

  • "...there were occasions when Jack was tempted to ask his way of the many fishermen, English and Dutch, who haunted those perilous banks in their shallow-draught doggers, schuyts, busses, howkers, and even bugalets, and who made his progress all the more uneasy by lying across his hawse until the last possible minute or suddenly looming out of the darkness without a single light so that he had to throw all aback." --Patrick O'Brian, The Surgeon's Mate, 285

    February 9, 2008