Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The beliefs, tastes, or lifestyle of an epicure.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Epicureanism

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The doctrines of Epicurus.
  • n. Epicurean habits of living; luxury.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. [cap. or lowercase] The doctrine of Epicurus, that enjoyment, or the pursuit of pleasure in life, is the chief good; Epicureanism.
  • n. By extension, luxury or indulgence in gross pleasure; sensual enjoyment; voluptuousness. See epicure, n., 2.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the disposition and habits of an epicure

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • There is a man here who loves a good dinner; Darteneuf [4] we might learn improvements in epicurism from him. one day he had procured two fine jacks for dinner on the following day. & to have them fresh put them in a trough of water, over night. the next morning — one had eaten the other.

    Letter 222

  • Thus, the alimentiveness of such animals as the dog, usually definite with regard to quantity and quality, can be pampered or educated up to a kind of epicurism, that is, an indefiniteness of object and action.

    Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation

  • After they had pulled, in this manner enough for an ample feast, they set-to, and showed, whatever might be said of the way in which their supper was procured, that their epicurism was a little more refined than that of the Scottish witches, who, according to Gellie Duncan's confession, feasted upon dead men's flesh in the old kirk of Berwick.

    Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions — Volume 2

  • After they had pulled in this manner enough for an ample feast, they set-to, and shewed, whatever might be said of the way in which their supper was procured, that their epicurism was a little more refined than that of the Scottish witches, who, according to Gellie Duncan's confession, feasted upon dead men's flesh in the old kirk of Berwick.

    Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

  • There was, besides, Mr. Winterblossom, who, in his usual spirit of quiet epicurism and self-indulgence, was, under the fire of a volley of compliments to Lady Penelope, scheming to secure for himself an early cup of tea.

    Saint Ronan's Well

  • Austin, frequent sermons, and yet professed usurers, mere gripes, tota vitae ratio epicurea est; all their life is epicurism and atheism, come to church all day, and lie with a courtesan at night.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • These are most impious, and commonly professed atheists, that never use the name of God but to swear by it; that express nought else but epicurism in their carriage, or hypocrisy; with Pentheus they neglect and contemn these rites and religious ceremonies of the gods; they will be gods themselves, or at least socii deorum.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • She was nice only from natural delicacy, but he had been brought up in a school of luxury and epicurism.

    Mansfield Park

  • He will find, moreover, a system of simple diet to be a system of perfect epicurism.

    The Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley

  • They cannot submit to resign the highest sensual gratification, nor even to relish the epicurism of virtue — self-denial.

    A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

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