Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. An elastic, insoluble, whitish protein produced by the action of thrombin on fibrinogen and forming an interlacing fibrous network in the coagulation of blood.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A white, albuminous, fibrous substance, formed in the coagulation of the blood.
  • n. An elastic, insoluble, whitish protein produced by the action of thrombin on fibrinogen and forming an interlacing fibrous network in the coagulation of blood.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A white, albuminous, fibrous substance, formed in the coagulation of the blood either by decomposition of fibrinogen, or from the union of fibrinogen and paraglobulin which exist separately in the blood. It is insoluble in water, but is readily digestible in gastric and pancreatic juice.
  • n. The white, albuminous mass remaining after washing lean beef or other meat with water until all coloring matter is removed; the fibrous portion of the muscle tissue; flesh fibrin.
  • n. An albuminous body, resembling animal fibrin in composition, found in cereal grains and similar seeds; vegetable fibrin.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A complex nitrogenous substance belonging to the class of proteids.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a white insoluble fibrous protein formed by the action of thrombin on fibrinogen when blood clots; it forms a network that traps red cells and platelets

Etymologies

fibre +‎ -in (“used to form chemical names of proteins, etc”) (Wiktionary)

Examples

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • "A diseased lung also includes the detritus of dissolved cells, along with various proteins such as fibrin and collagen that are part of the body's efforts to repair damage. (These repair efforts can cause their own problems. 'Fibrosis' occurs when too much fibrin interferes with the normal functioning of the lung."
    —John M. Barry, The Great Influenza (NY: Penguin Books, 2004), 244–245

    February 16, 2009