Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Variant of pewit.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. any of several birds

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A large crested Old World plover having wattles and spurs; the pewit.
  • n. Any of several small olive-colored woodland flycatchers of eastern North America.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See pewit.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. small olive-colored woodland flycatchers of eastern North America
  • n. large crested Old World plover having wattles and spurs

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Invisible larks poured trills over the velvety green fields and the ice-covered stubble, the peewit wept over the hollows and marshes still filled with brown water; high up the cranes and geese flew with their spring honking.

    Tolstoy III: Invisible Larks

  • And when these had vanished in the distance Graham heard a peewit wailing close at hand.

    When the Sleeper Wakes

  • The down was desolate, east and west, north and south; the road with its shallow ditches and white bordering stakes, ran smooth and empty north and south, and, save for that peewit, the blue sky was empty too.

    The Invisible Man

  • Overhead an anxious peewit circled against the blue, and every now and then emitted its feeble cry.

    The Wheels of Chance: a bicycling idyll

  • I just had a peewit bird follow me around the garden.

    4th May '05

  • As our peewit takes its name from the sound of its voice, so does the teru-tero.

    Journal of researches into the geology and natural history of the various countries visited by H.M.S. Beagle

  • The cries of the curlew and peewit, the honey-pale orb of the moon

    Under The Moon

  • The peewit was running about in the grass, one wing dangling to the ground.

    Tumbleweed

  • Here you may find nests of the strong down partridge and peewit, but take care that the keeper isn't down upon you; and in the middle of it is an old cromlech, a huge flat stone raised on seven or eight others, and led up to by a path, with large single stones set up on each side.

    Tom Brown's Schooldays

  • He growled a little at me and demanded, "Prithee, how comes it your peewit-brain bears such a ballast of fusty book-knowledge, chit?"

    No Great Magic

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Comments

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  • That colleague must work here too. The commute has to be grueling.

    October 14, 2008

  • And not to be confused with a peawit, which is one of my colleagues.

    October 13, 2008

  • In general, yes, but both spellings refer to several different species of birds--lapwing, flycatchers (especially phoebes) and Black-Headed Gull.

    October 13, 2008

  • I this the same bird as the pewit?

    October 10, 2008

  • British nickname for the lapwing (not to be confused with New World flycatchers such as the pewee, which have the same nickname).

    February 13, 2008