Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A loose mass of angular fragments of rock or masonry crumbled by natural or human forces.
  • n. Irregular fragments or pieces of rock used in masonry.
  • n. The masonry made with such rocks.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The broken remains of an object, usually rock or masonry.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Water-worn or rough broken stones; broken bricks, etc., used in coarse masonry, or to fill up between the facing courses of walls.
  • n. Rough stone as it comes from the quarry; also, a quarryman's term for the upper fragmentary and decomposed portion of a mass of stone; brash.
  • n. A mass or stratum of fragments or rock lying under the alluvium, and derived from the neighboring rock.
  • n. The whole of the bran of wheat before it is sorted into pollard, bran, etc.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Rough stones of irregular shapes and sizes, broken from larger masses either naturally or artificially, as by geological action, in quarrying, or in stone-cutting or blasting.
  • n. Masonry of rubble; rubble-work.
  • n. By extension, any solid substance in irregularly broken pieces.
  • n. The whole of the bran of wheat before it is sorted into pollard, bran, etc. [Prov. Eng.]

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the remains of something that has been destroyed or broken up

Etymologies

Middle English rubel.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Anglo-Norman *robel ("bits of broken stone"). Presumably related to rubbish, originally of same meaning (bits of stone). Ultimately presumably from Proto-Germanic *raub- (“to break”), perhaps via Old French robe (English rob ("steal")) in sense of “plunder, destroy”;[2] see also Middle English, Middle French -el. (Wiktionary)

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  • In castle architecture, walling made of rough, undressed stones or fill stone. In Bedrock, the short husband of Betty and neighbor of Fred.

    August 26, 2008