Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A medieval instrument resembling the trombone.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A brass instrument from the Renaissance and Baroque Eras, and an ancestor of the modern trombone. It was derived from the medieval slide trumpet.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A brass wind instrument, like a bass trumpet, so contrived that it can be lengthened or shortened according to the tone required; -- said to be the same as the trombone.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A medieval musical instrument of the trumpet family, having a long bent tube with a movable slide so that the vibrating column of air could be varied in length and the pitch of the tone changed, as in the modern trombone.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a medieval musical instrument resembling a trombone

Etymologies

French saquebute, from Old French saqueboute : Old North French saquier, to pull; see saccade + Old French bouter, to push (of Germanic origin; see bhau- in Indo-European roots).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Middle French sacquer ("to push") + bouter ("to pull") (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • A sackbut is a brass horn that looks alot like a trombone with a slightly smaller bell, and a shawm is a double reed instrument that is a predecessor to the oboe.

    Calling all Brits - The Panda's Thumb

  • (Chald. sabkha; Gr. sambuke), a Syrian stringed instrument resembling a harp (Dan. 3: 5, 7, 10, 15); not the modern sackbut, which is a wind instrument.

    Easton's Bible Dictionary

  • The sackbut was a wind instrument [see [1033] Music]; the sambuca was a triangular instrument, with strings, and played with the hand.

    Smith's Bible Dictionary

  • Early versions of the organ, fiddle (or vielle), and trombone (called the sackbut) existed as well.

    Recently Uploaded Slideshows

  • The 'sackbut' was merely our modern slide trombone, while the rest of these instruments were in common use in the 16th century, except the Psaltery, which Kircher (b.

    Shakespeare and Music With Illustrations from the Music of the 16th and 17th centuries

  • Before the sackbut, before the virginal struck perpendicular chords, our madrigals were sublime, loosing harmonies to unhinge the spheres.

    Strange Bedfellows

  • Now if ye be ready that at what time ye hear the sound of the cornet, flute, harp, sackbut, psaltery, and dulcimer, and all kinds of music, ye fall down and worship the image which I have made; well: but if ye worship not, ye shall be cast the same hour into the midst of a burning fiery furnace; and who is that God that shall deliver you out of my hands?

    The Dor�� Gallery of Bible Illustrations

  • Whereon (laugh not, reader, for it was the fashion of those musical as well as valiant days) up rose that noble old favorite of good Queen Bess, from cornet and sackbut, fife and drum; while

    Westward Ho!

  • Now if ye be ready that at what time ye hear the sound of the cornet, flute, harp, sackbut, psaltery, and dulcimer, and all kinds of musick, ye fall down and worship the image which I have made; well: but if ye worship not, ye shall be cast the same hour into the midst of a burning fiery furnace; and who is that God that shall deliver you out of my hands?

    Probably Just One Of Those Funny Coincidences

  • In matter of musical instruments, he learned to play upon the lute, the virginals, the harp, the Almain flute with nine holes, the viol, and the sackbut.

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

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