Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Present participle of scourge.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Ages in scourging authority and upholding the dignity of the downtrodden

    Nobel Prize for Literature 1997 - Press Release

  • The national chastisement, when it came, was consequently the more severe and the instruments employed by the Lord in scourging the revolted nation were

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

  • There is as much injustice in scourging as in crucifying an innocent man; nor would it be justified by pretending that this would satisfy the clamours of the people, and make him the object of their pity who was not to be the object of their envy.

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume V (Matthew to John)

  • Pilate's design in scourging him was that he might not be condemned, which did not take effect, but intimated what was

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume V (Matthew to John)

  • "who emulates the jesters of the Middle Ages in scourging authority and upholding the dignity of the downtrodden"

    Literature 1997

  • In Houselander's view, then, it would actually be Jasper who in this scene most resembles Christ, who is doing WJWD, revealing his love and in return receiving a scourging, which is given on a religious pretext, no less.

    Archive 2008-06-01

  • To this he replied, "Dulcinea is a maiden still, and my passion more firmly rooted than ever, our intercourse unsatisfactory as before, and her beauty transformed into that of a foul country wench;" and then he proceeded to give them a full and particular account of the enchantment of Dulcinea, and of what had happened him in the cave of Montesinos, together with what the sage Merlin had prescribed for her disenchantment, namely the scourging of

    Don Quixote

  • To this he replied, "Dulcinea is a maiden still, and my passion more firmly rooted than ever, our intercourse unsatisfactory as before, and her beauty transformed into that of a foul country wench;" and then he proceeded to give them a full and particular account of the enchantment of Dulcinea, and of what had happened him in the cave of Montesinos, together with what the sage Merlin had prescribed for her disenchantment, namely the scourging of Sancho.

    Don Quixote

  • One of these "scourging" exorcisms runs partly as follows:

    A History of the warfare of Science with Theology in Christendom

  • One thinks of the highwayman with his eyes shut in the "Arabian Nights"; and wonders whether any kind of scourging would prevail upon the Anglican highwayman to open "first one and then the other."

    On the Old Road, Vol. 2 (of 2) A Collection of Miscellaneous Essays and Articles on Art and Literature

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