Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A naval unit consisting of two or more divisions of a fleet.
  • n. An armored cavalry unit subordinate to a regiment and consisting of two or more troops.
  • n. A cavalry or armored unit of a European army, corresponding to a company.
  • n. A basic tactical air force unit, subordinate to a group and consisting of two or more flights.
  • n. A multitude or horde: "Squadrons of flies like particles of dust danced up and down” ( T.E. Lawrence).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Primarily, a square; hence, a square body of troops; a body of troops drawn up in a square.
  • n. A body of cavalry comprising two companies or troops, and averaging from one hundred and twenty to two hundred soldiers.
  • n. A detachment of vessels employed on any particular service or station, under the command of the senior officer; as, the North Atlantic Squadron.
  • n. A tactical air force unit; consists of at least two flights; multiple squadrons make up a group.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Primarily, a square; hence, a square body of troops; a body of troops drawn up in a square.
  • n. A body of cavalry comprising two companies or troops, and averaging from one hundred and twenty to two hundred men.
  • n. A detachment of vessels employed on any particular service or station, under the command of the senior officer.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To form into squadrons, as a body of soldiers.
  • To form in order; array.
  • n. A square.
  • n. A body of soldiers drawn up in a square, or in regular array, as for battle; specifically, in modern armies, the principal division of a regiment of cavalry.
  • n. A division of a fleet; a detachment of ships of war employed on a particular service or station, and under the command of a flag-officer.
  • n. in early New England records (1636), one of four divisions of town land, probably in the first instance a square.
  • n. A school district.
  • n. Sometimes spelled squadrant.
  • n.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a naval unit that is detached from the fleet for a particular task
  • n. an air force unit larger than a flight and smaller than a group
  • n. a cavalry unit consisting of two or more troops and headquarters and supporting arms

Etymologies

Italian squadrone, augmentative of squadra, squad; see squad.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
French escadron, formerly also esquadron, or Italian squadrone. See squad. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The Barbarian squadron is the all-woman piloted champ of the fleet, in no small part thanks to their mechanic Mac, who is an uplifted gibbon (part of a tribe of sentient apes that mixes with human society).

    Boing Boing

  • The silence from the chickenhawk squadron is deafening.

    Think Progress » CNN: Goss Resignation Is Complete Shock To Defense Dept., Fueling Speculation Over Backstory

  • The squadron is based out of Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, S.C., and is one of eight squadrons that make up Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3.

    KIA KIA/BNR

  • Indeed it has been proven that one of the most important instructions given to recruits on joining a regiment, a ship or a squadron, is the history of that unit, to inspire him with a sense of pride and responsibility.

    Canada's Defence—How and Who?

  • Not that I'd patrol with the half-blown reliners they call squadron leaders these days.

    Restoree

  • How is an airplane which has never flown to be in squadron service in that period of time?

    Impact of Strategy on Recent Developments

  • With this object in view the life of a fighting squadron is planned by the squadron commander.

    Experiences of a Canadian Aviator in France

  • You come down just above the enemy trenches, making certain that you are 200 or 300 yards behind, because the average man in a fighting squadron is not certain, to within 200 or 300 yards, exactly where our front line is and where the Huns are.

    Experiences of a Canadian Aviator in France

  • The king and commander of this hellish squadron is here described, [1.]

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume VI (Acts to Revelation)

  • He knew that a second flotilla of six destroyers with three swift second-class cruisers were following in to complete the work, which by this time should have begun, and that after them came the main French squadron, consisting of six first-class battleships with a screen of ten first and five second-class cruisers, the work of which would be to maintain a blockade against any relieving force, after the submarines and destroyers had sunk and crippled the ships of the Fleet Reserve and cut the connections of the contact mines.

    The World Peril of 1910

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