Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. One who holds the bets in a game or contest.
  • n. One who has a share or an interest, as in an enterprise.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A person holding the stakes of bettors, with the responsibility of delivering the pot to the winner of the bet.
  • n. An escrow agent or custodian.
  • n. A person filing an interpleader action, such as a garnishee or trustee, who acknowledges possession of property that is owed to one or more of several other claimants.
  • n. A person or organisation with a legitimate interest in a given situation, action or enterprise.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The holder of a stake; one with whom the bets are deposited when a wager is laid.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who holds the stakes, or with whom the bets are deposited when a wager is laid.
  • n. In law, one holding a fund which two or more claim adversely to each other.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. someone entrusted to hold the stakes for two or more persons betting against one another; must deliver the stakes to the winner

Etymologies

From stake +‎ holder. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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Comments

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  • I don't know. I've staked plenty a vegetable plant, in which case I was both the stakeholder and the stakedriver. Stakes keep thos 'maters from a rottin' on the ground...

    May 31, 2011

  • True enough. :)

    May 31, 2011

  • Unless your name is Buffy.

    May 31, 2011

  • Worst. Word. Ever.

    (Well, among the worst anyhow. Gah!)

    May 31, 2011

  • I hear this at work too often. Unhelpfully, it just makes me think of killing vampires.

    April 22, 2009

  • T.H.E.: 'Academics never had to worry about shareholders, but that mythical being, the stakeholder, now dominates their lives. Despite their diversity, there is no shortage of people who not only claim to know what stakeholders want, but are also determined to ensure that academics provide it.'

    December 23, 2008