Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Present participle of swinge.
  • adj. large, immense
  • adj. powerful, scathing (a swingeing verbal attack)

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Huge; very large.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Great; huge.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. severe; punishingly bad

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • David Cameron did say that he wouldn't make 'swingeing' cuts in the first year of his term.

    Giving evidence to the Chilcot inquiry, Tony Blair said: “I...

  • The TUC urged ministers to reconsider the "swingeing" cuts to public spending and focus instead on other ways to reduce the deficit, such as the suggested "Robin Hood" tax on financial transactions.

    Yahoo! News: Latest news headlines News Headlines | Top Stories

  • The TUC urged ministers to reconsider the "swingeing" cuts to public spending and focus instead on other ways to reduce the deficit, such as the suggested

    icScotland

  • David Cameron has promised that a Conservative government would not make "swingeing" cuts and Alistair Darling has insisted

    New Statesman

  • Mr Cameron decided to change course in February when he assured voters that cuts in the first year would not be 'particularly extensive' and certainly not 'swingeing'.

    Home | Mail Online

  • Despite the handwringing about our trivial, celebrity-obsessed culture, voters seem more worried by Cameron's "swingeing" cuts to their jobs and services, or the threat of him tipping the country into a double-dip recession than they are charmed by his silky warmth on Woman's Hour.

    The Guardian World News

  • By February this year, as polls showed that voters were taking fright at the idea of early cuts, Cameron toned down the rhetoric as he said that cuts would not be "swingeing".

    The Guardian World News

  • David Cameron has more recently appeared to row back from Osborne's harshest cost-cutting rhetoric, saying there would be no "swingeing" cuts this year.

    economic news and analysis | guardian.co.uk

  • It's therefore a delight to see some of the countrys - nay, the world's - top economists come out in favour of deficit spending, and against immediate and "swingeing" cuts, in

    New Statesman

  • No incoming government can make "swingeing" or "particularly extensive" cuts in public spending during its first year.

    Top stories from Times Online

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  • "...because of the Admiral's share of the last recapture, there were still the earlier ships, untainted by that vile twelfth, and there were after all the remaining eleven twelfths of the last; so that even allowing for the proctors' swingeing fees and the other legal expenses, it was reckoned that each single-share man would have fifty-three pounds thirteen and eightpence prize-money..."
    --Patrick O'Brian, The Reverse of the Medal, 75

    February 24, 2008