Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • interj. Used to express mild reproof, disapproval, or admonition.
  • n. A canine tooth, especially of a horse.
  • n. Chiefly Southern U.S. See tusk.
  • n. Slang The buttocks.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A tusk.
  • n. A small tusk sometimes found on the female Indian elephant.
  • n. The buttocks
  • n. nonsense; tosh
  • interj. an exclamation of contempt
  • v. To pull or drag (a heavy object such as a tree or log).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A long, pointed tooth; a tusk; -- applied especially to certain teeth of horses.
  • n. The buttocks; -- a euphemism.
  • interj. An exclamation indicating check, rebuke, or contempt.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • An exclamation expressing rebuke, impatience, or contempt, and equivalent to ‘pshaw! be silent’: as, tush! tush! never tell me such a story as that.
  • To express impatience, contempt, or the like by the exclamation “Tush!”
  • n. A long pointed tooth; a tusk; specifically, one of the four canine teeth of the horse.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the fleshy part of the human body that you sit on

Etymologies

Middle English tusche, from Old English tūsc; see tusk.
Alteration of Yiddish tokhes, from Hebrew taḥat, under, buttocks; see tḥt in Semitic roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old English tusc (Wiktionary)
Short for toches, from Yiddish תחת (tokhes), from Hebrew תַּחַת ("bottom"). Since 1914. (Wiktionary)
A "natural utterance" (OED), attested since the 15th century (Wiktionary)
of unknown origin, attested since 1841. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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  • The wing of a ploughshare. - old provincial term from Gloucestershire.

    May 3, 2011