Definitions

from The American HeritageĀ® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A rough, sharp, or jagged protuberance, as:
  • n. A tree or a part of a tree that protrudes above the surface in a body of water. Also called sawyer. See Regional Note at preacher.
  • n. A snaggletooth.
  • n. A break, pull, or tear in fabric.
  • n. An unforeseen or hidden obstacle. See Synonyms at obstacle.
  • n. A short or imperfectly developed branch of a deer's antler.
  • transitive v. To tear, break, hinder, or destroy by or as if by a snag: snagged a stocking on a splinter.
  • transitive v. Informal To catch unexpectedly and quickly: snagged a bargain.
  • transitive v. To free of snags: snagged the river.
  • transitive v. To catch (a fish), especially by hooking in a place other than its mouth.
  • intransitive v. To be damaged by a snag: His sweater snagged on a tree branch.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A stump or base of a branch that has been lopped off; a short branch, or a sharp or rough branch; a knot; a protuberance.
  • n. A tooth projecting beyond the rest; a broken or decayed tooth.
  • n. A tree, or a branch of a tree, fixed in the bottom of a river or other navigable water, and rising nearly or quite to the surface, by which boats are sometimes pierced and sunk.
  • n. A problem or difficulty with something.
  • n. A pulled thread or yarn, as in cloth.
  • n. One of the secondary branches of an antler.
  • v. To catch or tear (e.g. fabric) upon a rough surface or projection.
  • v. To fish by means of dragging a large hook or hooks on a line, intending to impale the body (rather than the mouth) of the target.
  • v. To obtain or pick up (something).
  • v. To cut the snags or branches from, as the stem of a tree; to hew roughly.
  • n. A light meal.
  • n. A misnaged, an opponent to Chassidic Judaism (more likely modern, for cultural reasons).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A stump or base of a branch that has been lopped off; a short branch, or a sharp or rough branch; a knot; a protuberance.
  • n. A tooth projecting beyond the rest; contemptuously, a broken or decayed tooth.
  • n. A tree, or a branch of a tree, fixed in the bottom of a river or other navigable water, and rising nearly or quite to the surface, by which boats are sometimes pierced and sunk.
  • n. One of the secondary branches of an antler.
  • transitive v. To cut the snags or branches from, as the stem of a tree; to hew roughly.
  • transitive v. To injure or destroy, as a steamboat or other vessel, by a snag, or projecting part of a sunken tree.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To catch or run upon a snag: as, to snag a fish-hook; to snag, a steamboat.
  • Figuratively, to entangle; embarrass; bring to a standstill.
  • To fill with snags; act as a snag to.
  • To clear of snags.
  • To trim by lopping branches; cut the branches, knots, or protuberances from, as the stem of a tree.
  • n. A sharp protuberance; a projecting point; a jag.
  • n. Specifically A short projecting stump, stub, or branch; the stubby base of a broken or cut-off branch or twig; a jagged branch separate from the tree.
  • n. A tree, or part of a tree, lying in the water with its branches at or near the surface, so as to be dangerous to navigation.
  • n. Hence A hidden danger or obstacle; an unsuspected source or occasion of error or mistake; a stnmbling-block.
  • n. 5. A snag-tooth.
  • n. The fang or root of a tooth.
  • n. A branch or tine on the antler of a deer; a point. See cut under antler.
  • n. plural The fruit of the snag-bush.
  • n. A snail.
  • n. In mech., a lug, or projection from a surface, through which there is a hole to receive a bolt or pin.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an opening made forcibly as by pulling apart
  • v. hew jaggedly
  • v. get by acting quickly and smartly
  • v. catch on a snag
  • n. an unforeseen obstacle
  • n. a dead tree that is still standing, usually in an undisturbed forest
  • n. a sharp protuberance

Etymologies

Of Scandinavian origin.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old Norse snagiĀ ("clothes peg"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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Comments

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  • In australia snag is both a sensitive new age guy or a sausage on the BBQ

    June 29, 2012

  • Australian slang: sausage

    "She leaves the spuds boiling on the stove and the snags spitting on low heat to go upstairs to listen to him tinkling on the piano."
    Cloudstreet by Tim Winton, p 158 of the Graywolf Press hardcover edition

    March 31, 2010

  • Good Lord, lead us,
    Good Lord speed us,
    From all perils protect us,
    From the darkness us direct;
    Finest nights to land our fish,
    Sound and big to fill our wish.
    God keep our nets from snag and break,
    For every man a goodly take,
    Lord grant us.

    - The ancient Spedwell Prayer, Britain

    October 23, 2009

  • You're fishing in a reservoir whose bottom is rife with trees that died when the dam was completed and the water flooded a valley behind the dam. Your hook gets caught on one of the submerged dead trees. That's how one can snag a snag. Mighty frustrating.

    September 17, 2009

  • So, what exactly would it mean to "snag a snag?"

    September 17, 2009