Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. An authoritative order or decree; an edict.
  • n. A proclamation of a czar having the force of law in imperial Russia.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An authoritative proclamation; an edict, especially decreed by a Russian czar or (later) emperor.
  • n. Any absolutist order and/or arrogant proclamation

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. In Russia, a published proclamation or imperial order, having the force of law.
  • n. an order or edict by someone holding absolute authority.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An edict or order, legislative or administrative, emanating from the Russian government.
  • n. Hence Any official proclamation.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an edict of the Russian tsar

Etymologies

French, from Russian ukaz, decree, from Old Church Slavonic ukazŭ, a showing, proof : u-, at, to + kazati, to point out, show.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Russian указ (ukáz, "edict, decree"), from Old East Slavic указъ (ukáz, "edict"), from указать (ukazat’, "to show, decree"), from Old Church Slavonic указати (ukazati, "to show, decree"), itself formed from the intensifying prefix у- (u-) (denoting a concrete purpose) + казати (kazati, "to show, order"). Compare Dutch oekaze, German Ukas, etc. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Am I to expect tomorrow your ukase that I give up Scotch and soda or your patronage?

    The House of Pride and Other Tales of Hawaii:The House of Pride

  • But no drug maker, ever, has formally and so publicly challenged the ukase of the FDA—an agency that can make or break companies and is known for punishing those who challenge it.

    Race Against the Cure

  • U.S. v. Alaska, 422 U.S. 184, 190 (1975) (“in 1821, Tsar Alexander I issued a ukase that purported to exclude all foreign vessels from the waters within 100 miles of the Alaska coast”).

    The Volokh Conspiracy » The Russian Influence on American Law

  • At his ukase the population ebbed and flowed over a hundred thousand miles of territory, and cities sprang up or disappeared at his bidding.

    CHAPTER 5

  • The unfortunate governor's ukase had precipitated a general debauch for all hands.

    Chapter 16

  • And, like his olden nights, his ukase went forth that there should be no quarrelling nor fighting, offenders to be dealt with by him personally.

    Chapter XIII

  • It’s certainly more artful typography than that of the Economist, which goes in the opposite direction on all these measures as if following the ukase “white space bad; more words good.

    Note To 'Newsweek': Jesus Sells

  • But we rested, too,  inside our bedded gulag, a mutual blasphemy that was one great, unobeyed ukase, our traitorous lie as yet unpunished in any Sibirskoye labor camp.

    Soviet

  • Then he issued what Kruckman called a “ukase,” evicting all but essential personnel from the lodge.

    Colossus

  • Alaska, 422 U.S. 184, 190 (1975) (“in 1821, Tsar Alexander I issued a ukase that purported to exclude all foreign vessels from the waters within 100 miles of the Alaska coast”).

    The Volokh Conspiracy » The Russian Influence on American Law

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Comments

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  • Frum the Russian word указ – ukaz, "edict".

    January 3, 2008