Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The common speech of a people; the vernacular.
  • n. A widely accepted text or version of a work.
  • n. The Latin edition or translation of the Bible made by Saint Jerome at the end of the fourth century A.D., now used in a revised form as the Roman Catholic authorized version.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. the vernacular language of a people

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Of or pertaining to the Vulgate, or the old Latin version of the Scriptures.
  • n. An ancient Latin version of the Scripture, and the only version which the Roman Church admits to be authentic; -- so called from its common use in the Latin Church.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Common; general; popular.
  • [capitalized] Of or pertaining to the Vulgate, or old Latin version of the Scriptures.
  • n. The Latin version of the Scriptures accepted as the authorized version of the Roman Catholic Church.
  • n. The vulgar or popular tongue; the vernacular.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the Latin edition of the Bible translated from Hebrew and Greek mainly by St. Jerome at the end of the 4th century; as revised in 1592 it was adopted as the official text for the Roman Catholic Church

Etymologies

Medieval Latin Vulgāta, from Late Latin vulgāta (editiō), popular (edition), from Latin, feminine past participle of vulgāre, to make known to all, from vulgus, the common people.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

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Comments

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  • Superb play, ptero!

    April 29, 2008

  • Oh no, the dreaded irritable vowel syndrome.

    April 29, 2008

  • *guffaw!*

    April 29, 2008

  • BLAHAHAHAHAHA!! HA HA!! Oh, ha, ha, ha!! Ptero, that's wonderful.

    April 29, 2008

  • Yes, but you shouldn't drink too many consonants in one day; it can irritate the vowels.

    April 29, 2008

  • It's also easier to drink consonants when they're in liquid form.

    April 29, 2008

  • According to Wikipedia, L is an alveolar lateral approximant. But it's also a type of liquid consonant, which I think makes it considerably sexier.

    April 29, 2008

  • Vvvvvvvvv...

    Actually, 1) I like labio-dental voiced fricative quite a bit, thanks frindley... and 2) I think I like this particular labio-dental voiced fricative more than most, especially with an L somewhere in the mix. Wait... is L also a labio-dental voiced fricative?

    Firkin L's.

    April 29, 2008

  • At least we're not talking about firkins.

    April 29, 2008

  • "Fricative: Of or relating to the act of fricking"?

    April 29, 2008

  • Oh, yes, say it again: fricative.

    April 29, 2008

  • c_b seems to be very fond of the labio-dental voiced fricative. Couldn't agree more. Mmmmmmm.

    Sorry, that should be Vvvvvvvvv.

    April 29, 2008

  • Sounds like another Washington sex scandal to me!

    April 29, 2008

  • Um...sounds like an OB/GYN exam to me, actually. *rubs eyes*

    April 29, 2008

  • But it's got a bit of vulva in it. Which you have to admit is a damn sexy word. So is velvet. Wait... I feel a disturbance in the List Force...

    April 29, 2008

  • Really? Seems rather vulgar to me. ;-)

    April 29, 2008

  • Ooh, this word's sexy.

    April 29, 2008