MaryW has adopted the words citation, lichenification, kakistocracy, wonderful, department chair, suffrage, cocker spaniel, quadrennial, monozygotic, and neophilic, looked up 1730 words, created 2 lists, listed 607 words, written 745 comments, added 0 tags, and loved 23 words.

Comments by MaryW

  • Talking about race is hard. It often involves hurt feelings and misunderstandings. And the words and phrases we use can either push those conversations forward or bring them to a standstill. One such term: white tears.

    The phrase has been used to gently tease white people who get upset at things they think threaten their white privilege. It's been used to poke fun at white people who think that talking about race makes you a racist. Or that Barack Obama's presidency marked the end of America. Or that it's a crime against humanity when a formerly white character is portrayed, or rumored to be portrayed, by a person of color.

    Leah Donnella, When the 'White Tears' Just Keep Coming, Morning Edition (NPR) (Nov. 28, 2018)

    November 29, 2018

  • Scientific research that involves nonscientists contributing to research processes – also known as ‘citizen science’ – supports participants’ learning, engages the public in science, contributes to community scientific literacy, and can serve as a valuable tool to facilitate larger scale research, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. If one of the goals of a citizen science project is to advance learning, designers should plan for it by defining intended learning outcomes and using evidence-based strategies to reach those outcomes.
    New Report Says ‘Citizen Science’ Can Support Both Science Learning and Research Goals; Inequities in Education, Opportunities, and Resources Must be Addressed to Meet Participants’ Learning Demands, National Academies of Science, Engineering, Medicine press release (Nov. 1, 2018)

    November 15, 2018

  • Many of the current reform efforts contain the seeds of the next generation of racial and social control, a system of “e-carceration” that may prove more dangerous and more difficult to challenge than the one we hope to leave behind.
    Michelle Alexander, The Newest Jim Crow, N.Y. Times (Nov. 8, 2018)
    E-Carceration is the use of technology to deprive people of their liberty. Electronic monitors combined with house arrest represent the most obvious and likely the most punitive form of E-Carceration. Typically the state, usually via the criminal legal system, enforces E-Carceration. But corporations are also getting into the act by charging fees for repressive regimes of parole and probation which often include monitors. If we don’t resist, E-Carceration may be the successor to mass incarceration as we exchange prison cells for being confined in our own homes and communities.
    What Is E-Carceration?, Challenging E-Carceration: The Voice of the Monitored (2017)

    November 14, 2018

  • Many of the current reform efforts contain the seeds of the next generation of racial and social control, a system of “e-carceration” that may prove more dangerous and more difficult to challenge than the one we hope to leave behind.
    Michelle Alexander, The Newest Jim Crow, N.Y. Times (Nov. 8, 2018)
    E-Carceration is the use of technology to deprive people of their liberty. Electronic monitors combined with house arrest represent the most obvious and likely the most punitive form of E-Carceration. Typically the state, usually via the criminal legal system, enforces E-Carceration. But corporations are also getting into the act by charging fees for repressive regimes of parole and probation which often include monitors. If we don’t resist, E-Carceration may be the successor to mass incarceration as we exchange prison cells for being confined in our own homes and communities.
    What Is E-Carceration?, Challenging E-Carceration: The Voice of the Monitored (2017)

    November 14, 2018

  • Well, we shouldn't overlook one important factor, which is many more human beings are moving into the woods.

    There are now 100 million Americans who live in what is known as the wildland-urban interface, or the WUI, as researchers call it.

    The science behind California’s surging wildfires, PBS NewsHour, Niv. 13, 2018

    November 14, 2018

  • Well, we shouldn't overlook one important factor, which is many more human beings are moving into the woods.

    There are now 100 million Americans who live in what is known as the wildland-urban interface, or the WUI, as researchers call it.

    The science behind California’s surging wildfires, PBS NewsHour, Niv. 13, 2018

    November 14, 2018

  • This paper evaluates the U.S. Census Bureau’s most recent data collection efforts to classify business entities that engage in an extreme form of production fragmentation called “factoryless” goods production. “Factoryless” goods-producing entities outsource physical transformation activities while retaining ownership of the intellectual property and control of sales to customers. Responses to a special inquiry on the incidence of purchases of contract manufacturing services in combination with data on production inputs and outputs, intellectual property, and international trade is used to identify and document characteristics of “factoryless” firms in the U.S. economy.
    Fariha Kamal,

    A Portrait of U.S. Factoryless Goods Producers

    , NBER Working Paper No. 25193 (Oct. 2018)

    November 7, 2018

  • This paper evaluates the U.S. Census Bureau’s most recent data collection efforts to classify business entities that engage in an extreme form of production fragmentation called “factoryless” goods production. “Factoryless” goods-producing entities outsource physical transformation activities while retaining ownership of the intellectual property and control of sales to customers. Responses to a special inquiry on the incidence of purchases of contract manufacturing services in combination with data on production inputs and outputs, intellectual property, and international trade is used to identify and document characteristics of “factoryless” firms in the U.S. economy.
    Fariha Kamal, A Portrait of U.S. Factoryless Goods Producers, NBER Working Paper No. 25193 (Oct. 2018)

    November 7, 2018

  • Phosphogypsum stacks, also known as gypstacks, are mountains of waste left over from fertilizer production. Some of that waste is radon and uranium.

    The EPA says that it's too radioactive to be buried, so it's piled in these stacks. There are 25 of these things in Florida, and they're some of the highest points in the state.

    Laura Newberry, Battle over phosphate mining roils small Fla. town, PBS Newshour (Oct. 31, 2018)

    November 1, 2018

  • Phosphogypsum stacks, also known as gypstacks, are mountains of waste left over from fertilizer production. Some of that waste is radon and uranium.

    The EPA says that it's too radioactive to be buried, so it's piled in these stacks. There are 25 of these things in Florida, and they're some of the highest points in the state.

    Laura Newberry, Battle over phosphate mining roils small Fla. town, PBS Newshour (Oct. 31, 2018)

    November 1, 2018

  • Seiches and meteotsunamis. What's the difference?

    Seiches and meteotsunamis are often grouped together, but they are two different events. Winds and atmospheric pressure can contribute to the formation of both seiches and meteotsunamis; however, winds are typically more important to a seiche motion, while pressure often plays a substantial role in meteotsunami formation. Sometimes a seiche and a meteotsunami can even occur at the same time. Seiches are standing waves with longer periods of water-level oscillations (typically exceeding periods of three or more hours), whereas meteotsunamis are progressive waves limited to the tsunami frequency band of wave periods (two minutes to two hours). Seiches are usually limited to partially or fully enclosed basins, such as Lake Erie. Meteotsunamis can occur in such basins but are also prevalent on the open coast. A single meteotsunami can travel long distances and influence a very large range of the coastline.

    What Is a Seiche?, NOAA

    Meteotsunamis are large waves that scientists are just beginning to better understand. Unlike tsunamis triggered by seismic activity, meteotsunamis are driven by air-pressure disturbances often associated with fast-moving weather events, such as severe thunderstorms, squalls, and other storm fronts. The storm generates a wave that moves towards the shore, and is amplified by a shallow continental shelf and inlet, bay, or other coastal feature.

    Meteotsunamis have been observed to reach heights of 6 feet or more. They occur in many places around the world, including the Great Lakes, Gulf of Mexico, Atlantic Coast, and the Mediterranean and Adriatic Seas.

    What Is a Meteotsunami?, NOAA

    October 30, 2018

  • What Is a Seiche?, NOAA

    Seiches and meteotsunamis. What's the difference?

    Seiches and meteotsunamis are often grouped together, but they are two different events. Winds and atmospheric pressure can contribute to the formation of both seiches and meteotsunamis; however, winds are typically more important to a seiche motion, while pressure often plays a substantial role in meteotsunami formation. Sometimes a seiche and a meteotsunami can even occur at the same time. Seiches are standing waves with longer periods of water-level oscillations (typically exceeding periods of three or more hours), whereas meteotsunamis are progressive waves limited to the tsunami frequency band of wave periods (two minutes to two hours). Seiches are usually limited to partially or fully enclosed basins, such as Lake Erie. Meteotsunamis can occur in such basins but are also prevalent on the open coast. A single meteotsunami can travel long distances and influence a very large range of the coastline.

    Id.

    October 30, 2018

  • A "patent box" is a term for the application of a lower corporate tax rate to the income derived from the ownership of patents. This tax subsidy instrument has been introduced in a number of countries since 2000.
    Fabian Gaessler et al., Should There Be Lower Taxes on Patent Income?, NBER Working Paper No. 24843 (July 2018)

    October 24, 2018

  • Holacracy is a comprehensively designed internal management system that has received significant attention for its adoption at Zappos, Medium, and other tech companies. Holacracy replaces the internal firm hierarchy with a governance process that looks, in many ways, like a constitutional democracy. However, holacracy has a nomenclature all its own. CEOs hand over their power to a system of governance “circles”--teams that are assigned specific management responsibilities. These teams have the power to design and refine corporate policy within their jurisdictions. There is no overarching hierarchy to make ultimate decisions or overrule teams; instead, there is generally one ultimate governance circle--representing the entire organization--that has the final authority. The circles manage the assignment of roles to workers and oversee their performance. Ultimately, holacracy is a combination of democratic republic, Quaker meetinghouse, and tech-speak: the system is structured to encourage participation by all employees in governance through a carefully designed set of roles and opportunities.
    Matthew T. Bodie, Holacracy and the Law, 42 Del. J. Corp. L. 621-22 (2018) (footnotes omitted)

    October 22, 2018

  • Holacracy is a comprehensively designed internal management system that has received significant attention for its adoption at Zappos, Medium, and other tech companies. Holacracy replaces the internal firm hierarchy with a governance process that looks, in many ways, like a constitutional democracy. However, holacracy has a nomenclature all its own. CEOs hand over their power to a system of governance “circles”--teams that are assigned specific management responsibilities. These teams have the power to design and refine corporate policy within their jurisdictions. There is no overarching hierarchy to make ultimate decisions or overrule teams; instead, there is generally one ultimate governance circle--representing the entire organization--that has the final authority. The circles manage the assignment of roles to workers and oversee their performance. Ultimately, holacracy is a combination of democratic republic, Quaker meetinghouse, and tech-speak: the system is structured to encourage participation by all employees in governance through a carefully designed set of roles and opportunities.
    Matthew T. Bodie, Holacracy and the Law, 42 Del. J. Corp. L. 621-22 (2018) (footnotes omitted)

    October 22, 2018

  • Holacracy is a comprehensively designed internal management system that has received significant attention for its adoption at Zappos, Medium, and other tech companies. Holacracy replaces the internal firm hierarchy with a governance process that looks, in many ways, like a constitutional democracy. However, holacracy has a nomenclature all its own. CEOs hand over their power to a system of governance “circles”--teams that are assigned specific management responsibilities. These teams have the power to design and refine corporate policy within their jurisdictions. There is no overarching hierarchy to make ultimate decisions or overrule teams; instead, there is generally one ultimate governance circle--representing the entire organization--that has the final authority. The circles manage the assignment of roles to workers and oversee their performance. Ultimately, holacracy is a combination of democratic republic, Quaker meetinghouse, and tech-speak: the system is structured to encourage participation by all employees in governance through a carefully designed set of roles and opportunities.
    Matthew T. Bodie, Holacracy and the Law, 42 Del. J. Corp. L. 621-22 (2018) (footnotes omitted)

    October 22, 2018

  • The increasing demand for rigor in empirical economics has led to the growing use of auxiliary tests (balance, specification, over-identification, placebo, etc.) supporting the credibility of a paper's main results. We dub these "sniff tests" because standards for passing are subjective and rejection is bad news for the author. Sniff tests offer a new window into publication bias since authors prefer them to be insignificant, the reverse of standard statistical tests.
    Christopher Snyder & Ran Zhuo, Values and Implications for Publication Bias (Sept. 2018) (abstract)

    October 5, 2018

  • No-poach provisions appear in lengthy franchise agreements that owners of fast-food franchises sign with corporate headquarters. Consequently, employees are generally unaware the provisions even exist. In effect, the provisions prohibit employees from moving among restaurants of the same corporate chain ― for example, prohibiting one Little Caesars employee from accepting employment from another Little Caesars franchise location for higher pay.

    Because employees cannot move to another location within their corporate brand, their current location has less incentive to give them raises.

    Press Release, AG Ferguson Secures End ot No-Poach Provisions at Eight More Restaurant Chains Nationwide (Sept. 13, 2018)

    October 5, 2018

  • No-poach provisions appear in lengthy franchise agreements that owners of fast-food franchises sign with corporate headquarters. Consequently, employees are generally unaware the provisions even exist. In effect, the provisions prohibit employees from moving among restaurants of the same corporate chain ― for example, prohibiting one Little Caesars employee from accepting employment from another Little Caesars franchise location for higher pay.

    Because employees cannot move to another location within their corporate brand, their current location has less incentive to give them raises.

    Press Release, AG Ferguson Secures End ot No-Poach Provisions at Eight More Restaurant Chains Nationwide (Sept. 13, 2018)

    October 5, 2018

  • The second week, Winer let him cut meat from bones and cut up scrap meat and grind it into hamburger, which was called chopmeat in the neighborhood.
    Betty Smith, Maggie-Now (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1958), pp. 382-83. (The setting is Brooklyn shortly after World War I.)

    September 11, 2018

  • Denny was making soup greens. He walked along the bins, taking a wrinkled carrot, an outside stalk leaf of celery, pinched with wilt at the top, a tomato with a soft spot and a sprig of parsley. He put these in a twist of paper called a toot. When he had enough toots filled, he wrote a sign on a paper bag: Sale on Soup Greens. Only 5¢.
    Betty Smith, Maggie-Now (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1958), p. 381 (The setting is Brooklyn, a few years after World War I.)

    September 11, 2018

  • Before the war, women' had worked as factory hands, store clerks, waitresses, telephone operators, typists, cashiers, housemaids and so forth . . .

    Now, most all jobs were open to them. They worked as trolley-car conductors, operated elevators, drew beer, worked milk delivery routes, replaced men in the post offices, wor cute uniforms and worked down at the Brooklyn Navy Yard and were called yeomanettes. Men stopped giving them their seats in the subways.

    Betty Smith, Maggie-Now (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1958), p. 256 ("The war" is World War I.)

    September 11, 2018

  • It was always a warm, sunny day with a sweet-smelling wind around the next corner. When Maggie-Now went to the baker's for the morning buns, there was usually a customer there who confided to the bakery woman: "I'm going to the cemetery in my shape today." That meant it was warm enough to go without a coat.

    Maggie-Now and her mother went to the cemetery in their shapes.

    Betty Smith, Maggie-Now (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1958), p. 107 (The setting is Brooklyn, before World War I.)

    September 11, 2018

  • There isn't even an agreed upon term for multi-book readers. There are bibliophiles — lovers of books. There are bibliotaphs — hoarders of books, with the intent of keeping the books out of the hands of others. There's even a word for people who like to read in bed — librocubicularist. But no succinct way of summing up the act of reading more than one book at at time.

    But that doesn't mean the internet hasn't tried to come up with a term on their own. I've seen "parallel readers" (recently suggested in a Quora forum). "Polynarritivus," from a Bookstr article last year. And "poly-reader," from a 2010 NPR piece.

    Maddy Foley, How to Read More Than One Book at a Time, According to Reddit Users Who Do It, Bustle (Sept. 6, 2018)

    September 11, 2018

  • There isn't even an agreed upon term for multi-book readers. There are bibliophiles — lovers of books. There are bibliotaphs — hoarders of books, with the intent of keeping the books out of the hands of others. There's even a word for people who like to read in bed — librocubicularist. But no succinct way of summing up the act of reading more than one book at at time.

    But that doesn't mean the internet hasn't tried to come up with a term on their own. I've seen "parallel readers" (recently suggested in a Quora forum). "Polynarritivus," from a Bookstr article last year. And "poly-reader," from a 2010 NPR piece.

    Maddy Foley, How to Read More Than One Book at a Time, According to Reddit Users Who Do It, Bustle (Sept. 6, 2018)

    September 11, 2018

  • There isn't even an agreed upon term for multi-book readers. There are bibliophiles — lovers of books. There are bibliotaphs — hoarders of books, with the intent of keeping the books out of the hands of others. There's even a word for people who like to read in bed — librocubicularist. But no succinct way of summing up the act of reading more than one book at at time.

    But that doesn't mean the internet hasn't tried to come up with a term on their own. I've seen "parallel readers" (recently suggested in a Quora forum). "Polynarritivus," from a Bookstr article last year. And "poly-reader," from a 2010 NPR piece.

    Maddy Foley, How to Read More Than One Book at a Time, According to Reddit Users Who Do It, Bustle (Sept. 6, 2018)

    September 11, 2018

  • There isn't even an agreed upon term for multi-book readers. There are bibliophiles — lovers of books. There are bibliotaphs — hoarders of books, with the intent of keeping the books out of the hands of others. There's even a word for people who like to read in bed — librocubicularist. But no succinct way of summing up the act of reading more than one book at at time.

    But that doesn't mean the internet hasn't tried to come up with a term on their own. I've seen "parallel readers" (recently suggested in a Quora forum). "Polynarritivus," from a Bookstr article last year. And "poly-reader," from a 2010 NPR piece.

    Maddy Foley, How to Read More Than One Book at a Time, According to Reddit Users Who Do It, Bustle (Sept. 6, 2018)

    September 11, 2018

  • There isn't even an agreed upon term for multi-book readers. There are bibliophiles — lovers of books. There are bibliotaphs — hoarders of books, with the intent of keeping the books out of the hands of others. There's even a word for people who like to read in bed — librocubicularist. But no succinct way of summing up the act of reading more than one book at at time.

    But that doesn't mean the internet hasn't tried to come up with a term on their own. I've seen "parallel readers" (recently suggested in a Quora forum). "Polynarritivus," from a Bookstr article last year. And "poly-reader," from a 2010 NPR piece.

    Maddy Foley, How to Read More Than One Book at a Time, According to Reddit Users Who Do It, Bustle (Sept. 6, 2018)

    September 11, 2018

  • There isn't even an agreed upon term for multi-book readers. There are bibliophiles — lovers of books. There are bibliotaphs — hoarders of books, with the intent of keeping the books out of the hands of others. There's even a word for people who like to read in bed — librocubicularist. But no succinct way of summing up the act of reading more than one book at at time.

    But that doesn't mean the internet hasn't tried to come up with a term on their own. I've seen "parallel readers" (recently suggested in a Quora forum). "Polynarritivus," from a Bookstr article last year. And "poly-reader," from a 2010 NPR piece.

    Maddy Foley, How to Read More Than One Book at a Time, According to Reddit Users Who Do It, Bustle (Sept. 6, 2018)

    September 11, 2018

  • During this era, the word "jay" meant something like "rube" or "hick" — a person from the sticks, who didn't know how to behave in a city. So pro-auto groups promoted use of the word "jay walker" as someone who didn't know how to walk in a city, threatening public safety.

    At first, the term was seen as offensive, even shocking. Pedestrians fired back, calling dangerous driving "jay driving."

    Joseph Stromberg, The Forgotten History of How Automakers Invented the Crime of “Jaywalking Vox (Nov. 4, 2015)

    See Peter Jensen Brown, Jaywalkers and Jayhawkers - a Pedestrian History and Etymology of "Jaywalking", Early Sports and Pop Culture History Blog (Nov. 24, 2014)

    August 27, 2018

  • During this era, the word "jay" meant something like "rube" or "hick" — a person from the sticks, who didn't know how to behave in a city. So pro-auto groups promoted use of the word "jay walker" as someone who didn't know how to walk in a city, threatening public safety.

    At first, the term was seen as offensive, even shocking. Pedestrians fired back, calling dangerous driving "jay driving."

    Joseph Stromberg, The Forgotten History of How Automakers Invented the Crime of “Jaywalking Vox (Nov. 4, 2015)

    See Peter Jensen Brown, Jaywalkers and Jayhawkers - a Pedestrian History and Etymology of "Jaywalking", Early Sports and Pop Culture History Blog (Nov. 24, 2014)

    August 27, 2018

  • During this era, the word "jay" meant something like "rube" or "hick" — a person from the sticks, who didn't know how to behave in a city. So pro-auto groups promoted use of the word "jay walker" as someone who didn't know how to walk in a city, threatening public safety.

    At first, the term was seen as offensive, even shocking. Pedestrians fired back, calling dangerous driving "jay driving."

    Joseph Stromberg, The Forgotten History of How Automakers Invented the Crime of “Jaywalking Vox (Nov. 4, 2015)

    See Peter Jensen Brown, Jaywalkers and Jayhawkers - a Pedestrian History and Etymology of "Jaywalking", Early Sports and Pop Culture History Blog (Nov. 24, 2014)

    August 27, 2018

  • During this era, the word "jay" meant something like "rube" or "hick" — a person from the sticks, who didn't know how to behave in a city. So pro-auto groups promoted use of the word "jay walker" as someone who didn't know how to walk in a city, threatening public safety.

    At first, the term was seen as offensive, even shocking. Pedestrians fired back, calling dangerous driving "jay driving."

    Joseph Stromberg, The Forgotten History of How Automakers Invented the Crime of “Jaywalking Vox (Nov. 4, 2015)

    See Peter Jensen Brown, Jaywalkers and Jayhawkers - a Pedestrian History and Etymology of "Jaywalking", Early Sports and Pop Culture History Blog (Nov. 24, 2014)

    August 27, 2018

  • Of the forty-one times that the phrase patient-centered appears in the Affordable Care Act, most occur in the law’s establishment of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute. The institute will be a new, independent organization for comparative effectiveness research. Donald Berwick, now Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, has defined patient-centered as

    “the experience (to the extent the informed, individual patient desires it) of transparency, individualization, recognition, respect, dignity, and choice in all matters, without exception, related to one’s person, circumstances, and relationships in health care.”

    Tony Coelho, A Patient Advocate’s Perspective on Patient-Centered Comparative Effectiveness Research, Health Affairs, vol. 29, p. 1886 (2010).

    Cites DM Berwick, What "Patient-Centered" Should Mean: Confessions of an Extremist, Health Affairs, vol. 28, no. 4, w560 (2009)

    August 24, 2018

  • The same basic technique can tell us a lot about how banks—and other bank-like creatures or SIFIs,2 to use the industry lingo—should fail.

    note 2: Systemically Important Financial Institutions.

    Stephen J. Lubben, A Functional Analysis of SIFI Insolvency, 96 Tex. L. Rev. 1377 (2018)

    August 17, 2018

  • The same basic technique can tell us a lot about how banks—and other bank-like creatures or SIFIs,2 to use the industry lingo—should fail.

    note 2: Systemically Important Financial Institutions.

    Stephen J. Lubben, A Functional Analysis of SIFI Insolvency, 96 Tex. L. Rev. 1377 (2018)

    August 17, 2018

  • The same basic technique can tell us a lot about how banks—and other bank-like creatures or SIFIs,2 to use the industry lingo—should fail.

    note 2: Systemically Important Financial Institutions.

    Stephen J. Lubben, A Functional Analysis of SIFI Insolvency, 96 Tex. L. Rev. 1377 (2018)

    August 17, 2018

  • We, Moya Bailey and Trudy aka @thetrudz, had significant roles in the creation and proliferation of the term misogynoir. Misogynoir describes the anti-Black racist misogyny that Black women experience. Despite coining the term in 2008 and writing about the term online since 2010, we experience to varying degrees, our contributions being erased, or writing not cited, or our words plagiarized by people who find the word compelling. . . . This is not to say that every time the word is used our names need to be mentioned, but it does matter that our intellectual interventions are understood in proper context.
    Moya Bailey, On Misogynoir: Citation, Erasure, and Plagiarism, Moya Bailey (blog) (March 13, 2018) (links to article in Feminist Media Studies, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 762-68 (pub. online March 13, 2018)).

    August 16, 2018

  • Our social feeds have been on fire with a mind-bending, gasp-worthy video posted by percuss.io earlier this week — below — made by the accomplished Indian percussionist B.C. Manjunath. He's a master of konnakol -- the Carnatic, or South Indian, art of speaking percussive syllables in rapid-fire, intricate patterns to convey a larger thalam, or rhythmic cycle.
    Anastasia Tsioulcas, Let This Percussionist Blow Your Mind With The Fibonacci Sequence, NPR (Aug. 10, 2018)

    August 15, 2018

  • Our social feeds have been on fire with a mind-bending, gasp-worthy video posted by percuss.io earlier this week — below — made by the accomplished Indian percussionist B.C. Manjunath. He's a master of konnakol -- the Carnatic, or South Indian, art of speaking percussive syllables in rapid-fire, intricate patterns to convey a larger thalam, or rhythmic cycle.
    Anastasia Tsioulcas, Let This Percussionist Blow Your Mind With The Fibonacci Sequence, NPR (Aug. 10, 2018)

    August 15, 2018

  • Our social feeds have been on fire with a mind-bending, gasp-worthy video posted by percuss.io earlier this week — below — made by the accomplished Indian percussionist B.C. Manjunath. He's a master of konnakol -- the Carnatic, or South Indian, art of speaking percussive syllables in rapid-fire, intricate patterns to convey a larger thalam, or rhythmic cycle.
    Anastasia Tsioulcas, Let This Percussionist Blow Your Mind With The Fibonacci Sequence, NPR (Aug. 10, 2018)

    August 15, 2018

  • "Just please don't Frankenbite me," Liz said, and Anne looked at her blankly. "Isn't that what it's called?" Liz said. "When you take one word I said here and one word there and put them together into a sentence that you use as a voiceover?"

    "I've never heard that term." Anne was still smiling. . . .

    Bullshit, Liz thought. Bullshit you've never heard it.

    Curtis Sittenfeld, Eligible (New York: Random House, 2016), p. 437

    August 9, 2018

  • In the reception room, Darcy had gestured at the doorway, which was framed by columns and a peaked roof, and said to Liz, "All that trim is known as an aedicule—that's a good word for a writer, huh?"
    Curtis Sittenfeld, Eligible (New York: Random House, 2016), p. 323)

    August 9, 2018

  • Tempora mutantur is a Latin adage meaning "times change." It dates to 16th century Germany. Source: Wikipedia

    August 9, 2018

  • in order for a disclosure regulation to serve as a device that aids issuers in making a credible commitment to complete and continuous disclosure into the future, it must have a characteristic "lobster trap" structure: easy to enter voluntarily; hard to exit.
    Edward Rock, Securities Regulation as Lobster Trap: A Credible Commitment Theory of Mandatory Disclosure, 23 Cardozo L. Rev. 675, 692 (2002)

    August 1, 2018

  • See non rivalrously.

    July 20, 2018

  • See non rivalrously.

    July 20, 2018

  • while copyright, patent, trademark and unfair competition are conventionally conjoined—perhaps to give the field more heft—is the combination coherent? After all, few lawyers' practices encompass all of these.

    Nonetheless, these subjects share certain characteristics. Because all these legal regimes cover intangibles that can be enjoyed "non rivalrously"—that is, without depriving other consumers of equal benefit—they require justification.

    Jane C. Ginsburg & Rochelle Cooper Dreyfuss, "Introduction and Overview," in Intellectual Property Stories (New York: Foundation Press, 2006), p. 1

    July 20, 2018

  • Perhaps you’ve heard the term “helicopter parenting” as a way to describe the way today’s 20-somethings (Gen Y) were hovered over in childhood by their parents. As a life coach to 20-somethings and consultant to corporations with Gen Y employees, I’ve seen the effects of an even more intrusive child-rearing style that I have coined as “cockpit parenting.” Cockpit parents did more than hover. They sat right in the pilot’s seat of their child’s life, charting the course and navigating all of the twists and turns. And they often remain there well into their child’s adulthood. . . .

    . . .

    Cockpit parents tend to pull all kinds of maneuvers like this. Things like writing their child’s résumé, calling in favors to their friends to get their child an internship or job, or even making-up corporations where their child has “worked.” And let’s not forget my personal favorite: listing themselves as references. These parents think they are helping, but they are not. There is a line between supporting your children and enabling them. And if cockpit parents continue to sit in the pilot’s seat of their child’s life, then the adult child continues to remain dependent on mom and dad for advice, money and answers to questions they should be answering for themselves.

    Christine Hassler, Cockpit Parents: How They're Flying 20-Somethings into the Ground, Huffpost Blog (March 18, 2011)

    June 3, 2018

  • Perhaps you’ve heard the term “helicopter parenting” as a way to describe the way today’s 20-somethings (Gen Y) were hovered over in childhood by their parents. As a life coach to 20-somethings and consultant to corporations with Gen Y employees, I’ve seen the effects of an even more intrusive child-rearing style that I have coined as “cockpit parenting.” Cockpit parents did more than hover. They sat right in the pilot’s seat of their child’s life, charting the course and navigating all of the twists and turns. And they often remain there well into their child’s adulthood. . . .

    . . .

    Cockpit parents tend to pull all kinds of maneuvers like this. Things like writing their child’s résumé, calling in favors to their friends to get their child an internship or job, or even making-up corporations where their child has “worked.” And let’s not forget my personal favorite: listing themselves as references. These parents think they are helping, but they are not. There is a line between supporting your children and enabling them. And if cockpit parents continue to sit in the pilot’s seat of their child’s life, then the adult child continues to remain dependent on mom and dad for advice, money and answers to questions they should be answering for themselves.

    Christine Hassler, Cockpit Parents: How They're Flying 20-Somethings into the Ground, Huffpost Blog (March 18, 2011)

    June 3, 2018

  • a "sex robot" is any artificial entity that is used for sexual purposes (i.e., for sexual stimulation and release) that meets the following three conditions:

    Humanoid form, i.e., it is intended to represent (and is taken to represent) a human or human-like being in its appearance.

    Human-like movement/behavior, i.e., it is intended to represent (and is taken to represent) a human or humanlike being in its behaviors and movements.

    Some degree of artificial intelligence, i.e., it is capable of interpreting and responding to information in its environment. This may be minimal (e.g., simple preprogrammed behavioral responses) or more sophisticated (e.g., human-equivalent intelligence).

    John Danaher, "Should We Be Thinking About Robot Sex?", in John Danaher & Neil McArthur, eds., Robot Sex: Social and Ethical Implications (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2017), pp. 4-5

    Danaher and other contributors to the book seem to use sex robot interchangeably with sexbot.

    June 3, 2018

  • a "sex robot" is any artificial entity that is used for sexual purposes (i.e., for sexual stimulation and release) that meets the following three conditions:

    Humanoid form, i.e., it is intended to represent (and is taken to represent) a human or human-like being in its appearance.

    Human-like movement/behavior, i.e., it is intended to represent (and is taken to represent) a human or humanlike being in its behaviors and movements.

    Some degree of artificial intelligence, i.e., it is capable of interpreting and responding to information in its environment. This may be minimal (e.g., simple preprogrammed behavioral responses) or more sophisticated (e.g., human-equivalent intelligence).

    John Danaher, "Should We Be Thinking About Robot Sex?", in John Danaher & Neil McArthur, eds., Robot Sex: Social and Ethical Implications (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2017), pp. 4-5

    Danaher and other contributors to the book seem to use sex robot interchangeably with sexbot.

    June 3, 2018

  • there are thos who see the purpose of sex as necessarily procreative. According to procreationism (as it is sometimes called), any sexual activity that is inherently non-procreative, as sex with a robot must be, violates this natural purpose of sex, and is therefore immoral. . . . Such people do not generally insist that each individual sex act must be intended to produce children. Rather, they argue that acceptable sex acts must belong to the class of acts that could potentially be reproductive.
    Neil McArthur, "The Case for Sexbots" in John Danaher & Neil McArthur, eds., Robot Sex: Social and Ethical Implications (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2017), p. 35

    June 3, 2018

  • With the emergence of virtual reality technologies . . . and haptic technologies (i.e., technologies that replicate and transmit touchlike sensations via a network), it is possible to have immersive sexual experiences in virtual reality.
    John Danaher, "Should We Be Thinking About Robot Sex?", in John Danaher & Neil McArthur, eds., Robot Sex: Social and Ethical Implications (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2017), p. 5

    June 3, 2018

  • With the emergence of virtual reality technologies . . . and haptic technologies (i.e., technologies that replicate and transmit touchlike sensations via a network), it is possible to have immersive sexual experiences in virtual reality.
    John Danaher, "Should We Be Thinking About Robot Sex?", in John Danaher & Neil McArthur, eds., Robot Sex: Social and Ethical Implications (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2017), p. 5

    June 3, 2018

  • Since the early part of the twentieth century there have been further developments in the technology of sex, from artificial vaginas to lifelike silicone dolls to teledildonics.
    John Danaher, "Should We Be Thinking About Robot Sex?", in John Danaher & Neil McArthur, eds., Robot Sex: Social and Ethical Implications (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2017), pp. 3-4

    June 3, 2018

  • Theranostics takes advantage of novel nanotechnology platforms by incorporating therapy, imaging diagnostics, and cell targeting into one system with multifunctional capabilities. Theranostic nanomedicine exploits the multifunctional capabilities of nanoscale devices and the molecular knowledge of the human body to diagnose, treat, and possibly, prevent diseases.
    Fabrice Jotterand & Archie A. Alexander, Managing the “Known Unknowns”: Theranostic Cancer Nanomedicine and Informed Consent, in Sarah J. Hurst, ed., Biomedical Nanotechnology: Methods and Protocols (New York: Humana Press, 2011), p. 414

    May 24, 2018

  • Theranostics takes advantage of novel nanotechnology platforms by incorporating therapy, imaging diagnostics, and cell targeting into one system with multifunctional capabilities. Theranostic nanomedicine exploits the multifunctional capabilities of nanoscale devices and the molecular knowledge of the human body to diagnose, treat, and possibly, prevent diseases.
    Fabrice Jotterand & Archie A. Alexander, Managing the “Known Unknowns”: Theranostic Cancer Nanomedicine and Informed Consent, in Sarah J. Hurst, ed., Biomedical Nanotechnology: Methods and Protocols (New York: Humana Press, 2011), p. 414

    May 24, 2018

  • Theranostics takes advantage of novel nanotechnology platforms by incorporating therapy, imaging diagnostics, and cell targeting into one system with multifunctional capabilities. Theranostic nanomedicine exploits the multifunctional capabilities of nanoscale devices and the molecular knowledge of the human body to diagnose, treat, and possibly, prevent diseases.
    Fabrice Jotterand & Archie A. Alexander, Managing the “Known Unknowns”: Theranostic Cancer Nanomedicine and Informed Consent, in Sarah J. Hurst, ed., Biomedical Nanotechnology: Methods and Protocols (New York: Humana Press, 2011), p. 414

    May 24, 2018

  • Lichenification is when your skin becomes thick and leathery as a result of constant scratching. When you continually scratch an area of skin for a prolonged period of time, your skin cells begin to grow. This leads to a thickening of the skin and an exaggeration of normal skin markings — such as cracks, wrinkles, or scales — which gives your skin a leathery or bark-like appearance.
    Healthline

    May 18, 2018

  • “Hole” seems like a terrible name for something that is actually very dense and solid. “Black mass” would be a better name if it didn’t sound like a satanic ritual.
    Jorge Cham & Daniel Whiteson, We Have No Idea: A Guide to the Unknown Universe (Riverhead Books: New York, 2017), p. 197 n. 82

    May 7, 2018

  • Does a nearly instantaneous twenty-five order of magnitude faster-than-light expansion of the fabric of space-time sound totally ridiculous and made up? If so, you’re probably not a crazy physicist.

    In fact, this is the solution physicists have come up with to explain why the universe is bigger than it should be and why it is at an even temperature. They call is (drumroll) “inflation.” Okay, not the more awe inspiring of names. But the crazy thing is that it’s probably true.

    Jorge Cham & Daniel Whiteson, We Have No Idea: A Guide to the Unknown Universe (Riverhead Books: New York, 2017), p. 240

    May 7, 2018

  • Google the word “tardigrade” and prepare to be shocked.
    Jorge Cham & Daniel Whiteson, We Have No Idea: A Guide to the Unknown Universe (Riverhead Books: New York, 2017), p. 321 n. 126

    May 7, 2018

  • See Thomas Boothby, Meet the Tardigrade, the Toughest Animal on Earth, TED-Ed.

    May 7, 2018

  • The name “cosmic ray“ might be a little unnecessarily intriguing: it simply means a particle from space. Stars and other objects are constantly shooting out photons, protons, neutrinos, and even some heavy ions.

    Jorge Cham & Daniel Whiteson, We Have No Idea: A Guide to the Unknown Universe (Riverhead Books: New York, 2017), p. 186

    May 6, 2018

  • By “locality,” we mean the idea that the number of things that can affect you is limited by the number of things that are close to you.
    Jorge Cham & Daniel Whiteson, We Have No Idea: A Guide to the Unknown Universe (Riverhead Books: New York, 2017), p. 175

    May 6, 2018

  • In 1932, Benjamin Malzberg, a New York epidemiologist, published a study showing that people with mental illness died, on average, 14 to 18 years earlier than otherwise similar people in the general population.1 This mortality gap persists today and may even have widened: a 2006 U.S. study suggested that it ranged from 13 to 30 years.2 Indeed, the gap persists worldwide,3 mostly owing to medical conditions, such as cancer and cardiovascular disease, rather than “unnatural” causes, such as accidents and suicide.
    Lisa Rosenbaum, M.D., Closing the Mortality Gap, New Eng. J. Med., Oct. 20, 2016

    May 2, 2018

  • "It turns out that if you dislike the music, it is more damaging to hearing.

    "These data have been around since the early '70s. We're not too sure of all the reasons, but we do know that when you're disliking something, you have a higher stress level. And believe it or not, the biochemistry of the ear changes, and it makes you slightly more susceptible to hearing loss. It's called glutamate ototoxicity."audiologist Marshall Chasin, interviewed by Peter O'Dowd, For Musicians, Hearing Loss Is 'More Common Than One Would Think,' Audiologist Says Here & Now (Apr. 30, 2018)

    April 30, 2018

  • The citation network tells us how ideas are related; visual representations tell us how ideas are communicated. Figures from related groups, authors, and fields share a ‘DNA’ that can reveal how information is conveyed.

    We adopt the term viziometrics to describe this line of research to convey the shared goals with bibliometrics and scientometrics. As with bibliometrics, viziometrics uses citations to measure impact, but focuses on relating impact to the patterns of figure use. We analyze theses patterns within the papers (specifically, the distribution of various figure types) in order to understand how they may be used to more effectively communicate ideas. We have two overarching goals . . . First, we seek to build new tools and services based on the visual information in the literature to help researchers find results more efficiently. . . . Second, can the patterns of figure use inform new best practices for scientific communication, especially outside of the authors’ own discipline?

    Po-Shen Lee, Jevin D. West & Bill Howe, Viziometrics: Analyzing Visual Information in the Scientific Literature, IEEE Transactions in Big Data, Vol. 4, No. 1 (March 1, 2018)

    April 24, 2018

  • The citation network tells us how ideas are related; visual representations tell us how ideas are communicated. Figures from related groups, authors, and fields share a ‘DNA’ that can reveal how information is conveyed.

    We adopt the term viziometrics to describe this line of research to convey the shared goals with bibliometrics and scientometrics. As with bibliometrics, viziometrics uses citations to measure impact, but focuses on relating impact to the patterns of figure use. We analyze theses patterns within the papers (specifically, the distribution of various figure types) in order to understand how they may be used to more effectively communicate ideas. We have two overarching goals . . . First, we seek to build new tools and services based on the visual information in the literature to help researchers find results more efficiently. . . . Second, can the patterns of figure use inform new best practices for scientific communication, especially outside of the authors’ own discipline?

    Po-Shen Lee, Jevin D. West & Bill Howe, Viziometrics: Analyzing Visual Information in the Scientific Literature, IEEE Transactions in Big Data, Vol. 4, No. 1 (March 1, 2018)

    April 24, 2018

  • The citation network tells us how ideas are related; visual representations tell us how ideas are communicated. Figures from related groups, authors, and fields share a ‘DNA’ that can reveal how information is conveyed.

    We adopt the term viziometrics to describe this line of research to convey the shared goals with bibliometrics and scientometrics. As with bibliometrics, viziometrics uses citations to measure impact, but focuses on relating impact to the patterns of figure use. We analyze theses patterns within the papers (specifically, the distribution of various figure types) in order to understand how they may be used to more effectively communicate ideas. We have two overarching goals . . . First, we seek to build new tools and services based on the visual information in the literature to help researchers find results more efficiently. . . . Second, can the patterns of figure use inform new best practices for scientific communication, especially outside of the authors’ own discipline?

    Po-Shen Lee, Jevin D. West & Bill Howe, Viziometrics: Analyzing Visual Information in the Scientific Literature, IEEE Transactions in Big Data, Vol. 4, No. 1 (March 1, 2018)

    April 24, 2018

  • While at the University of Washington, in Seattle, where he taught for 33 years, Professor North helped found a branch of inquiry called cliometrics, named for the muse of history, Clio, after he and others had concluded that traditional market-oriented economics faltered in measuring some aspects of economic performance quantitatively.
    Robert D. Hershey Jr., Douglass C. North, Maverick Economist and Nobel Laureate, Dies at 95, N.Y. Times (Nov. 24, 2015)

    April 23, 2018

  • A deplorable practice has emerged in the world of adoption. Adoptive families are now using the Internet to give their unwanted adopted children over to complete strangers, some of whom are traffickers, pedophiles, child pornographers, or worse. This practice is known as private re-homing. Through the use of online message boards and a simple notarized power of attorney document, adoptive parents are circumventing the adoption system-including its home study and background check requirements for prospective parents-and placing children in great danger.
    S. Megan Testerman, Note, A World Wide Web of Unwanted Children: The Practice, the Problem, and the Solution to Private Re-Homing, 67 Fla. L. Rev. 2103 (2015) (abstract)

    April 19, 2018

  • A deplorable practice has emerged in the world of adoption. Adoptive families are now using the Internet to give their unwanted adopted children over to complete strangers, some of whom are traffickers, pedophiles, child pornographers, or worse. This practice is known as private re-homing. Through the use of online message boards and a simple notarized power of attorney document, adoptive parents are circumventing the adoption system-including its home study and background check requirements for prospective parents-and placing children in great danger.
    S. Megan Testerman, Note, A World Wide Web of Unwanted Children: The Practice, the Problem, and the Solution to Private Re-Homing, 67 Fla. L. Rev. 2103 (2015) (abstract)

    April 19, 2018

  • A deplorable practice has emerged in the world of adoption. Adoptive families are now using the Internet to give their unwanted adopted children over to complete strangers, some of whom are traffickers, pedophiles, child pornographers, or worse. This practice is known as private re-homing. Through the use of online message boards and a simple notarized power of attorney document, adoptive parents are circumventing the adoption system-including its home study and background check requirements for prospective parents-and placing children in great danger.
    S. Megan Testerman, Note, A World Wide Web of Unwanted Children: The Practice, the Problem, and the Solution to Private Re-Homing, 67 Fla. L. Rev. 2103 (2015) (abstract)

    April 19, 2018

  • Distributions with long tails are called leptokurtic; distributions with short tails are called platykurtic. Normal distributions have zero kurtosis.

    David M. Lane et al., Introduction to Statistics (I don't see the date), p. 669

    April 7, 2018

  • Distributions with long tails are called leptokurtic; distributions with short tails are called platykurtic. Normal distributions have zero kurtosis.

    David M. Lane et al., Introduction to Statistics (I don't see the date), p. 669

    April 7, 2018

  • Distributions with long tails are called leptokurtic; distributions with short tails are called platykurtic. Normal distributions have zero kurtosis.

    David M. Lane et al., Introduction to Statistics (I don't see the date), p. 669

    April 7, 2018

  • Distributions with long tails are called leptokurtic; distributions with short tails are called platykurtic. Normal distributions have zero kurtosis.

    David M. Lane et al., Introduction to Statistics (I don't see the date), p. 669

    April 7, 2018

  • And while there were plenty of henotheist pagans (that is, people who worshiped one god while not denying the validity of others), Christianity went far beyond henotheism’s hesitant claim upon ultimate truth. It was an exclusivist faith that foreclosed — was designed to foreclose — devotion to all other deities.
    Tom Bissell, Why Did Christianity Prevail?, N.Y. Times Book Review, Feb. 18, 2018 (print title: When Pagans Became Christians)

    February 18, 2018

  • And while there were plenty of henotheist pagans (that is, people who worshiped one god while not denying the validity of others), Christianity went far beyond henotheism’s hesitant claim upon ultimate truth. It was an exclusivist faith that foreclosed — was designed to foreclose — devotion to all other deities.
    Tom Bissell, Why Did Christianity Prevail?, N.Y. Times Book Review, Feb. 18, 2018 (print title: When Pagans Became Christians)

    February 18, 2018

  • Afrofuturism is a cultural aesthetic, philosophy of science, and philosophy of history that combines elements of science fiction, historical fiction, fantasy, Afrocentrism, and magic realism with non-Western cosmologies in order to critique not only the present-day dilemmas of black people, but also to revise, interrogate, and re-examine the historical events of the past. First coined by Mark Dery in 1993, and explored in the late 1990s through conversations led by scholar Alondra Nelson,1 Afrofuturism addresses themes and concerns of the African diaspora through a technoculture and science fiction lens, encompassing a range of media and artists with a shared interest in envisioning black futures that stem from Afrodiasporic experiences.2 Seminal Afrofuturistic works include the novels of Samuel R. Delany and Octavia Butler; the canvases of Jean-Michel Basquiat and Angelbert Metoyer, and the photography of Renée Cox; the explicitly extraterrestrial mythoi of Parliament-Funkadelic, the Jonzun Crew, Warp 9, Deltron 3030, and Sun Ra; and the Marvel Comics superhero Black Panther.
    Wikipedia (visited Feb. 16, 2018)

    February 16, 2018

  • See vuja de.

    February 5, 2018

  • See vuja de.

    February 5, 2018

  • On a trip to London last month, I had at last the opportunity to read Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World, the new book by our keynote speaker for the InsideNGO 2016 Annual Conference, Adam Grant. Early in the book, Grant discusses how as human beings our nature is to "rationalize the status quo as legitimate." He calls this the "default system" and highlights the many perils of taking the status quo for granted and never questioning the default assumptions we make.

    To counter this, Grant suggests flipping the old idea of déjà vu where we encounter something new but feel like we have experienced it before to a new approach, vuja de. Vuja de, Grant writes, "is the reverse—we face something familiar, but we see it with a fresh perspective that enables us to gain new insight from old problems."

    Tom Dente, From déjà vu to vuja de: The Importance of New Perspectives, Humentum blog (June 8, 2016)

    February 5, 2018

  • I hadn't seen the "rose garden" sense before, but there it is.

    we were having photographs taken in the rosary outside Rosecliff Mansion
    Bryan Garner, Nino and Me (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2018), ch. 6

    January 22, 2018

  • See phubbing.

    January 21, 2018

  • an online sub-community of perpetrators has identified and dubbed the practice of nonconsensually removing condoms during sex "stealthing."
    Alexandra Brodsky, "Rape-Adjacent": Imagining Legal Responses to Nonconsensual Condom Removal, 32 Col. J. Gender & L. 183, 184 (2017)

    January 14, 2018

  • When Nazis and white supremacists rally, the antifa are likely to show up, too.

    Antifa” is short for antifascists, though the name by no means includes everyone who opposes fascism. The antifa is a relatively small movement of the far left, with ties to anarchism. It arose in Europe’s punk scene in the 1980s to fight neo-Nazism.

    The antifa says that because Nazism and white supremacy are violent, we must use any means necessary to stop them. This includes physical means, like what they did on my campus: forming a crowd to block ticket-holders from entering a venue to hear a right extremist speak.

    The antifa’s tactics often backfire, just like those of Germany’s communist opposition to Nazism did in the 1920s. Confrontations escalate. Public opinion often blames the left no matter the circumstances.

    Laurie Marhoefer, How Should We Protest Neo-Nazi? Lessons from German History, The Conversation (Aug. 21, 2017)

    January 4, 2018

  • Swatting, which has a long history in the online gaming world, refers to the practice of making an emergency call about a fake situation often involving a killing or hostages, in the hopes of sending police to the address of an adversary or random person.

    . . .

    . . . Swatting has been used as a tactic to harass and intimidate people across the country and is typically done with digital tools that disguise the caller’s location.

    . . .

    Rep. Katherine Clark, a Massachusetts Democrat, introduced an anti-swatting bill in 2015 — then was herself the victim of swatting.

    Eli Rosenberg & Herman Wong, A police officer fatally shot a man while responding to an emergency call now called a ‘swatting’ prank, Wash. Post, Dec. 30, 2017

    December 30, 2017

  • Swatting, which has a long history in the online gaming world, refers to the practice of making an emergency call about a fake situation often involving a killing or hostages, in the hopes of sending police to the address of an adversary or random person.

    . . .

    . . . Swatting has been used as a tactic to harass and intimidate people across the country and is typically done with digital tools that disguise the caller’s location.

    . . .

    Rep. Katherine Clark, a Massachusetts Democrat, introduced an anti-swatting bill in 2015 — then was herself the victim of swatting.

    Eli Rosenberg & Herman Wong, A police officer fatally shot a man while responding to an emergency call now called a ‘swatting’ prank, Wash. Post, Dec. 30, 2017

    December 30, 2017

  • The menu offers coffee, black tea, beer, wine and pastries, but nearly everyone opts for a $5 mug of kratom (pronounced KRAY-dum).

    A powder ground from the leaves of an indigenous Southeast Asian tree related to the coffee plant, kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) offers pain relief and mood enhancement, similar to prescription painkillers.

    Advocates say the substance, which does not depress the respiratory system and therefore presents little to no overdose risk, could help reduce the nation’s reliance on highly addictive and often deadly prescription painkillers. Some addiction experts also argue the plant could be used as an alternative to methadone, buprenorphine and Vivitrol in medication-assisted therapy for opioid addiction.

    Used for centuries to fight fatigue, pain and anxiety in Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea and Thailand, kratom was rarely taken in the United States until recently.

    Christine Vestal, As Kratom Use Surges, Some States Enact Bans, Stateline (Dec. 4, 2017)

    December 11, 2017

  • . . . it caused "harm" to trans people, for example by "dead-naming" a trans woman, that is, referring to her by her former male name.
    Making Sense of the Culture War over Transgender Identity, The Economist, Nov. 16, 2017

    November 22, 2017

  • A war of words has broken out between some transgender activists and women they call TERFs (trans-exclusionary radical feminists) about who should be let into women-only spaces, from domestic-violence refuges to women’s literary and sports competitions.
    Making Sense of the Culture War over Transgender Identity, The Economist, Nov. 16, 2017

    November 22, 2017

  • A war of words has broken out between some transgender activists and women they call TERFs (trans-exclusionary radical feminists) about who should be let into women-only spaces, from domestic-violence refuges to women’s literary and sports competitions.
    Making Sense of the Culture War over Transgender Identity, The Economist, Nov. 16, 2017

    November 22, 2017

  • A ghost gun is a firearm without serial numbers. The term is used by gun control advocates, gun rights advocates, law enforcement, and some in the firearm industry.1234 By making the gun themselves, owners may legally bypass background checks and registration regulations.1 Some ghost guns become part of the illicit firearms trade.5 Under U.S. federal law, the creation and possession of ghost guns is permitted, but a license is required to manufacture firearms for sale or distribution.
    Wikipedia
    When Kevin Neal went on a deadly shooting rampage last week in California, he was armed with at least two semi-automatic rifles, known as "ghost guns," that he didn't buy in a store or from a gun dealer, authorities say.

    "These arms are manufactured illegally, we believe, by him at his home," said Tehama County assistant sheriff Phil Johnston, during a news conference on Nov. 15.

    . . .

    Given Neal's criminal background, it was clearly illegal for him to possess these guns once they had been assembled.

    Brian Mann, Do-It-Yourself 'Ghost Guns' Bypass Background Checks And Firearm Registration, NPR, Nov. 21, 2017

    November 22, 2017

  • Our brains react to our world in milliseconds—faster than we’re consciously aware. And much of what drives our everyday decisions, including what we’ll watch, talk about and buy, are the emotional responses that traditional self-report methods alone can’t measure.

    That’s where consumer neuroscience comes in, a field that Nielsen has been in for nearly 10 years. Through neuroscience, we help brands understand consumers’ non-conscious engagement and responses, which they can use to create stronger connections with their audiences.

    We integrate best-in-class neuroscience technologies with traditional research methods, so that we, along with our clients, will learn faster, develop better testing protocols and deliver stronger results than anyone in the industry.

    Nielsen Consumer Neuroscience

    November 13, 2017

  • Remember Gamergate?

    Or when the identity of that dentist who killed Cecil the Lion was posted?

    Or that man who was wrongly identified as the Boston Marathon bomber?

    These were all examples of how making someone’s personal, and sometimes private, information public on the internet led to intense harassment.

    Today, each of the cases could easily be termed a form of doxxing — short for “dropping documents.” In the last few years, doxxing has increasingly been used as an online weapon to attack people. People’s “documents” — records of their addresses, relatives, finances — get posted online with the implicit or explicit invitation for others to shame or hector them.

    Decca Muldowney, So What the Hell Is Doxxing?, ProPublica, Nov. 4, 2017. The article also uses "dox" and "doxed."

    November 7, 2017

  • Remember Gamergate?

    Or when the identity of that dentist who killed Cecil the Lion was posted?

    Or that man who was wrongly identified as the Boston Marathon bomber?

    These were all examples of how making someone’s personal, and sometimes private, information public on the internet led to intense harassment.

    Today, each of the cases could easily be termed a form of doxxing — short for “dropping documents.” In the last few years, doxxing has increasingly been used as an online weapon to attack people. People’s “documents” — records of their addresses, relatives, finances — get posted online with the implicit or explicit invitation for others to shame or hector them.

    Decca Muldowney, So What the Hell Is Doxxing?, ProPublica, Nov. 4, 2017. The article also uses "dox" and "doxed."

    November 7, 2017

  • Tulane University economics professor James Alm researches tax compliance, tax evasion and an idea known as "tax morale."

    "Tax morale is an attempt to measure one’s intrinsic motivation to pay taxes," he explained.

    There’s a rate at which economists predict people would pay taxes based on the likelihood of getting caught and punished for not paying. In the U.S., more people pay more taxes and cheat less than what the “rational model” might suggest. Alm's research shows we have the highest tax morale of any developed country.

    Adriene Hill, How Americans Really Feel About Taxes, Marketplace (Sept. 27, 2017)

    Many researchers have suggested that the intrinsic motivation for individuals to pay taxes—what is sometimes termed their "tax morale"—differs across countries; that is, if taxpayer values are influenced by cultural norms, with different societal institutions acting as constraints and varying between different countries, then tax morale may be an important determinant of taxpayer compliance and other forms of behavior. However, isolating the reasons for these differences in tax morale is notoriously difficult.
    James Alm & Benno Torgler, Culture Differences and Tax Morale in the United Statesand in Europe, CREMA Working Paper No. 2004-14 (July 9, 2004)

    October 13, 2017

  • The term “jumpout” is slang in the D.C. area for infamous squads of armed police officers who conduct surprise “stop-and-frisk” maneuvers.
    Alec Karakatsanis, Policing, Mass Imprisonment, and the Failure of American Lawyers, 128 Harv. L. Rev. F. 253 (2015) (citing icole Flatow, If You Thought Stop-And-Frisk Was Bad, You Should Know About Jump-Outs, ThinkProgress (Dec. 11, 2014, 11:00 AM), http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2014/12/10/3468340/jump-outs http://perma.cc/F374-VL8L'>http://perma.cc/F374-VL8L).

    August 23, 2017

  • The term “jumpout” is slang in the D.C. area for infamous squads of armed police officers who conduct surprise “stop-and-frisk” maneuvers.
    Alec Karakatsanis, Policing, Mass Imprisonment, and the Failure of American Lawyers, 128 Harv. L. Rev. F. 253 (2015) (citing icole Flatow, If You Thought Stop-And-Frisk Was Bad, You Should Know About Jump-Outs, ThinkProgress (Dec. 11, 2014, 11:00 AM), http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2014/12/10/3468340/jump-outs http://perma.cc/F374-VL8L'>http://perma.cc/F374-VL8L).

    August 23, 2017

  • Also, it’s important to consider that there are different types of coding in blockchain. Alber divided them into two categories: ‘wet code’ and ‘dry code’. Dry code, he said, comprises transferring a piece of intellectual property, like a novel, through the blockchain, and hashing it so only those with the appropriate decryption key could access it. All conditions regarding transfer can be expressed inside the blockchain, and ownership can be transferred without human involvement. On the other hand, wet code can be used for something like a lease hold, where someone might have to go in and apply, say, building conditions.
    Ian Lopez, Where Blockchain Finds a Home in Law, Legaltech News, Aug. 18, 2017

    August 23, 2017

  • Also, it’s important to consider that there are different types of coding in blockchain. Alber divided them into two categories: ‘wet code’ and ‘dry code’. Dry code, he said, comprises transferring a piece of intellectual property, like a novel, through the blockchain, and hashing it so only those with the appropriate decryption key could access it. All conditions regarding transfer can be expressed inside the blockchain, and ownership can be transferred without human involvement. On the other hand, wet code can be used for something like a lease hold, where someone might have to go in and apply, say, building conditions.
    Ian Lopez, Where Blockchain Finds a Home in Law, Legaltech News, Aug. 18, 2017

    August 23, 2017

  • The house was a sober living house or "sober home" — a kind of privately owned halfway house intended to integrate recovering drug and alcohol users back into community life and help them stay on the right path.
    Peter Haden, 'Body Brokers' Get Kickbacks To Lure People With Addictions To Bad Rehab, All Things Considered, Aug. 15, 2017

    Sober living houses (SLHs) are alcohol and drug free living environments for individuals attempting to abstain from alcohol and drugs. They are not licensed or funded by state or local governments and the residents themselves pay for costs.
    Douglas L. Polcin et al., What Did We Learn from Our Study on Sober Living Houses and Where Do We Go from Here?, J. Psychoactive Drugs, Dec. 2010

    August 17, 2017

  • The house was a sober living house or "sober home" — a kind of privately owned halfway house intended to integrate recovering drug and alcohol users back into community life and help them stay on the right path.
    Peter Haden, 'Body Brokers' Get Kickbacks To Lure People With Addictions To Bad Rehab, All Things Considered, Aug. 15, 2017

    Sober living houses (SLHs) are alcohol and drug free living environments for individuals attempting to abstain from alcohol and drugs. They are not licensed or funded by state or local governments and the residents themselves pay for costs.
    Douglas L. Polcin et al., What Did We Learn from Our Study on Sober Living Houses and Where Do We Go from Here?, J. Psychoactive Drugs, Dec. 2010

    August 17, 2017

  • The house was a sober living house or "sober home" — a kind of privately owned halfway house intended to integrate recovering drug and alcohol users back into community life and help them stay on the right path.
    Peter Haden, 'Body Brokers' Get Kickbacks To Lure People With Addictions To Bad Rehab, All Things Considered, Aug. 15, 2017

    Sober living houses (SLHs) are alcohol and drug free living environments for individuals attempting to abstain from alcohol and drugs. They are not licensed or funded by state or local governments and the residents themselves pay for costs.
    Douglas L. Polcin et al., What Did We Learn from Our Study on Sober Living Houses and Where Do We Go from Here?, J. Psychoactive Drugs, Dec. 2010

    August 17, 2017

  • The house was a sober living house or "sober home" — a kind of privately owned halfway house intended to integrate recovering drug and alcohol users back into community life and help them stay on the right path.
    Peter Haden, 'Body Brokers' Get Kickbacks To Lure People With Addictions To Bad Rehab, All Things Considered, Aug. 15, 2017

    Sober living houses (SLHs) are alcohol and drug free living environments for individuals attempting to abstain from alcohol and drugs. They are not licensed or funded by state or local governments and the residents themselves pay for costs.
    Douglas L. Polcin et al., What Did We Learn from Our Study on Sober Living Houses and Where Do We Go from Here?, J. Psychoactive Drugs, Dec. 2010

    August 17, 2017

  • The first step for unscrupulous rehab centers: Recruiting clients who have good health insurance. That's created a whole new industry — something called patient brokering or "body brokering.

    The corrupt owner of a drug treatment center might pay $500 per week in kickbacks to the operators of sober homes who send them clients with health insurance . . . ."

    Delray Beach authorities say body brokers used to target recovering drug users hanging out on the patio of a local Starbucks. The coffee shop restricted access to the patio in 2015, after a meeting with the city officials and the police department.

    Peter Haden, 'Body Brokers' Get Kickbacks To Lure People With Addictions To Bad Rehab, All Things Considered, Aug. 15, 2017

    August 17, 2017

  • The first step for unscrupulous rehab centers: Recruiting clients who have good health insurance. That's created a whole new industry — something called patient brokering or "body brokering.

    The corrupt owner of a drug treatment center might pay $500 per week in kickbacks to the operators of sober homes who send them clients with health insurance . . . ."

    Delray Beach authorities say body brokers used to target recovering drug users hanging out on the patio of a local Starbucks. The coffee shop restricted access to the patio in 2015, after a meeting with the city officials and the police department.

    Peter Haden, 'Body Brokers' Get Kickbacks To Lure People With Addictions To Bad Rehab, All Things Considered, Aug. 15, 2017

    August 17, 2017

  • The first step for unscrupulous rehab centers: Recruiting clients who have good health insurance. That's created a whole new industry — something called patient brokering or "body brokering.

    The corrupt owner of a drug treatment center might pay $500 per week in kickbacks to the operators of sober homes who send them clients with health insurance . . . ."

    Delray Beach authorities say body brokers used to target recovering drug users hanging out on the patio of a local Starbucks. The coffee shop restricted access to the patio in 2015, after a meeting with the city officials and the police department.

    Peter Haden, 'Body Brokers' Get Kickbacks To Lure People With Addictions To Bad Rehab, All Things Considered, Aug. 15, 2017

    August 17, 2017

  • Introduced by Rep. Mike Simpson, R-Idaho, and Kurt Schrader, D-Ore., the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act would put an end to federal policy that amounts to throwing good money after bad. The bill, which is co-sponsored by a bipartisan group of 16 representatives, targets the practice of “fire borrowing” in the suppression of wildfires.

    In short, the approach forces federal agencies to redirect money from other areas — namely, forest management and fire prevention — when the cost of fighting fires exceeds expectations. This leaves less money for prevention, which exacerbates the fires in future years.

    In Our View: Put Out 'Fire Borrowing', The Columbian, June 19, 2017

    Fire borrowing is a budgetary practice that occurs when federal agencies divert funds from forest health and fire prevention programs to fight wildfires.
    Western Governors Urge Congress: Make End to 'Fire Borrowing' Top Priority, Western Governors' Association, Nov. 15, 2016

    August 8, 2017

  • Young adults living in poverty face high exposure to “go throughs”: lived experiences of structural disadvantage and trauma with lasting implications for educational, economic, and other life outcomes. They frequently “get through” these challenges without formal mental health supports, relying on community-based programs and peer networks to cope with their experiences.

    Go Throughs to Get Through: Low Income Young Adults and Mental Health, CLASP (June 5, 2017)

    August 8, 2017

  • Yes, the most “delicate” way to spruce up century-old sculptures is to hit them with pellets of dry ice at supersonic speeds. That’s the badass science of fine art conservation for you.
The formal name for the technique is “carbon dioxide cleaning,” and it actually has all kinds of applications: removing particles from electric circuits, cleaning telescope mirrors, preparing laboratory samples, manufacturing metal parts. But at the Freer, the objective was to scour away the protective wax layer that coats the Saint-Gaudens statues. This would allow conservators to clean and polish the bronze underneath before applying a fresh wax coating and placing the figures back on their

    pedestals.

    Sarah Kaplan, Museum uses micro explosions to save fine art from bird poop, Wash. Post, July 19, 2017

    July 24, 2017

  • Trump — a known germaphobe — is not a natural hugger. But every time he meets “angel moms,” whose children have been killed by illegal immigrants, they expect to receive an embrace from the president.

    . . .

    While Obama showcased Dreamers at State of the Union addresses, Trump invited angel families to sit in first lady Melania Trump’s box during his address to Congress in February.

    Ashley Parker et al., Trump's Wall: What's Behind the President's Fixation on Immigration?, Wash. Post, July 19, 2017

    July 24, 2017

  • Trump — a known germaphobe — is not a natural hugger. But every time he meets “angel moms,” whose children have been killed by illegal immigrants, they expect to receive an embrace from the president.

    . . .

    While Obama showcased Dreamers at State of the Union addresses, Trump invited angel families to sit in first lady Melania Trump’s box during his address to Congress in February.

    Ashley Parker et al., Trump's Wall: What's Behind the President's Fixation on Immigration?, Wash. Post, July 19, 2017

    July 24, 2017

  • Another noun sense:

    At Hoover's request, (Attorney General) Brownell had asked congressional committee chairmen for new laws allowing wiretapping without a warrant. They had said no, time and again. Hoover had asked for the legal authorization for microphone surveillances—bugging, or "technicals," in Bureauspeak—but the lawmakers spurned the request.
    Tim Weiner, Enemies: A History of the FBI (New York: Random House, 2012), p. 192

    July 19, 2017

  • A condition characterized by rampant boondoggles.

    The FBI's intelligence division chief, Al Belmont, told General Doolittle's investigative group

    the CIA was shot through with "waste, inefficiency, and plain boondogglery."
    Tim Weiner, Enemies: A History of the FBI (New York: Random House, 2012), p. 189

    July 19, 2017

  • Morris agreed to create a legend—a ghost job with false credentials—in Paramount's Berlin office. The legendlegend served as a deep cover for Vassili Zarubin, later chief of Soviet espionage in the United States during World War II.
    Tim Weiner, Enemies: A History of the FBI (New York: Random House, 2012), p. 181

    July 19, 2017

  • Attorney General Thomas Gregory

    authorized the Bureau of Investigation to round up the "slackers"—men who had failed to register for the military draft—in the spring and summers of 1918.
    Tim Weiner, Enemies: A History of the FBI (New York: Random House, 2012), p. 16

    July 19, 2017

  • Rhythm and meter are the engine driving virtually all music, and it is likely that they were the very first elements used by our ancestors to make protomusics, a tradition we still hear today in tribal drumming, and in the rituals of various preindustrial cultures. While I believe timbre is now at the center of our approciation of music, rhythm has held supreme power over listeners for much longer..
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 55

    June 19, 2017

  • Rhythm and meter are the engine driving virtually all music, and it is likely that they were the very first elements used by our ancestors to make protomusics, a tradition we still hear today in tribal drumming, and in the rituals of various preindustrial cultures. While I believe timbre is now at the center of our approciation of music, rhythm has held supreme power over listeners for much longer..
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 55

    June 19, 2017

  • The organ player typically has control over which of these supplementary pipes he wants to blow air through by pulling and pushing levers, or drawbars, that direct the flow of air. Knowing that clarinets have a lot of energy in the odd harmonics of the overtone series, a clever organ player could simulate the sound of a clarinet by manipulating drawbars in such a way as to recreate the overtone series of that instrument.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 48

    June 19, 2017

  • When you hear a saxophone playing a tone with a fundamental frequency of 220 Hz, you are actually hearing many tones, not just one. The other tones you hear are integer multiples of the fundamental: 440, 660, . . . . These different tones—the overtones—have different intensities, and so we hear them as having different loudnesses for these tones is distinctive of the saxophone, and they are what give rise to its unique tonal color, its unique sound—its timbre. . . . Indeed, for each instrument, there exists a unique pattern of overtones. . . . Virtually all of the tonal variation we hear—the quality that gives a trumpet its trumpetiness and that gives a piano its pianoness—comes from the unique way in which the loudnesses of the overtones are distributed.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 46

    June 19, 2017

  • When you hear a saxophone playing a tone with a fundamental frequency of 220 Hz, you are actually hearing many tones, not just one. The other tones you hear are integer multiples of the fundamental: 440, 660, . . . . These different tones—the overtones—have different intensities, and so we hear them as having different loudnesses for these tones is distinctive of the saxophone, and they are what give rise to its unique tonal color, its unique sound—its timbre. . . . Indeed, for each instrument, there exists a unique pattern of overtones. . . . Virtually all of the tonal variation we hear—the quality that gives a trumpet its trumpetiness and that gives a piano its pianoness—comes from the unique way in which the loudnesses of the overtones are distributed.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 46

    June 19, 2017

  • When you hear a saxophone playing a tone with a fundamental frequency of 220 Hz, you are actually hearing many tones, not just one. The other tones you hear are integer multiples of the fundamental: 440, 660, . . . . These different tones—the overtones—have different intensities, and so we hear them as having different loudnesses for these tones is distinctive of the saxophone, and they are what give rise to its unique tonal color, its unique sound—its timbre. . . . Indeed, for each instrument, there exists a unique pattern of overtones. . . . Virtually all of the tonal variation we hear—the quality that gives a trumpet its trumpetiness and that gives a piano its pianoness—comes from the unique way in which the loudnesses of the overtones are distributed.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 46

    June 19, 2017

  • If a musician is playing the white keys, how do I know if he is playing the A minor scale or the C major scale? The answer is that—entirely without our conscious awareness—our brains are keeping track of how many times particular notes are sounded, where they appear in terms of strong versus weak beats, and how long they last. A computational process in the brain makes an inference about the key we're in based on these properties. This is another example of something that most of us can do even without musical training, and what psychologist call declarative knowledge—the ability to talk about it . . . .
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 38

    June 19, 2017

  • The basilar membrane of the inner ear contains hair cells that are frequency selective, firing only in response to a certain band of frequencies. These are stretched out across the membrane from low frequencies to high; low-frequency sounds excite hair cells on one end of the basilar membrane, medium frequency sounds excite the hair cells in the middle, and high-frequency sounds excite them at the other end. . . . Because the different tones are spread out across the surface topography of the membrane, this is called a tonotopic map.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 28

    June 19, 2017

  • The basilar membrane of the inner ear contains hair cells that are frequency selective, firing only in response to a certain band of frequencies. These are stretched out across the membrane from low frequencies to high; low-frequency sounds excite hair cells on one end of the basilar membrane, medium frequency sounds excite the hair cells in the middle, and high-frequency sounds excite them at the other end. . . . Because the different tones are spread out across the surface topography of the membrane, this is called a tonotopic map.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 28

    June 19, 2017

  • The basilar membrane of the inner ear contains hair cells that are frequency selective, firing only in response to a certain band of frequencies. These are stretched out across the membrane from low frequencies to high; low-frequency sounds excite hair cells on one end of the basilar membrane, medium frequency sounds excite the hair cells in the middle, and high-frequency sounds excite them at the other end. . . . Because the different tones are spread out across the surface topography of the membrane, this is called a tonotopic map.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 28

    June 19, 2017

  • The notion of relative pitch values is seen readily in the way that we speak. When you ask someone a question, your voice naturally rises in intonation at the end of the sentence, signaling that you are asking. . . . This is a convention in English (thought not in all languages—we have to learn it), and is known in linguistics as a prosodic cue.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 27

    Sing. pinna

    June 19, 2017

  • Sound waves impinge on the eardrums and pinnae (the fleshy parts of your ear), setting off a chain of mechanical and neurochemical events, the end product of which is an internal mental image we call pitch.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 24

    Sing. pinna

    June 19, 2017

  • The official definition of the Acoustical Society of America is that timbre is everything about a sound that is not loudness or pitch. So much for scientific precision!
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 19

    June 19, 2017

  • Psychophysicists—scientists who study the ways that the brain interacts with the physical world—have shown that these attributes are separable. Each can be varied without altering the others, allowing the scientific study of one at a time.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 17

    June 19, 2017

  • Psychophysicists—scientists who study the ways that the brain interacts with the physical world—have shown that these attributes are separable. Each can be varied without altering the others, allowing the scientific study of one at a time.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 17

    June 19, 2017

  • The term “commuter” includes anybody who has a job and doesn’t work at home.
    Tim Henderson, In Most States, a Spike in 'Super Commuters', Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), June 5, 2017

    June 12, 2017

  • The number of commuters who travel 90 minutes or more to get to work increased sharply between 2010 and 2015, a shift that traffic experts, real estate analysts and others attribute to skyrocketing housing costs and a reluctance to move, born of memories of the 2008 financial crisis.

    In all but 10 states, the number of “super commuters” increased over the period, and in California, Hawaii, Massachusetts, North Dakota and Rhode Island, it grew by more than 40 percent, according to census data.

    Tim Henderson, In Most States, a Spike in 'Super Commuters', Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), June 5, 2017

    June 12, 2017

  • Harvard researchers have designed robots to address various medical applications, from helping hearts pump blood to fighting cancer. Now, they’re adding a new accomplishment to their list: improving mobility. Two research teams have tackled this challenge by designing a special type of robot called an exosuit: a soft, flexible robotic device that people can wear like another layer of clothing.
    Alisha Ukani, These Bots Were Made for Walking, Harvard Magazine, June 8, 2017

    June 9, 2017

  • One associate referred to Comey’s preparation as a kind of “murder board” — a phrase used to describe a committee of questioners that hurls tough questions at someone as practice for a difficult oral examination.
    Devlin Barrett et al., Comey prepared extensively for his conversations with Trump, Wash. Post, May 18, 2017

    May 19, 2017

  • Hoping to spare other young couples severe consequences like those, the Fosters pushed for a bill the Montana Legislature passed last month that would reduce the penalties for teens caught engaging in consensual sexual activity. The measure also would expand the age range covered by the state’s existing Romeo and Juliet law. Named for Shakespeare’s young lovers, the laws vary from state to state but typically provide legal protections or reduced penalties for teens close in age who engage in sexual activity.
    Rebecca Beitsch, Shakespeare and Sexting: Reconsidering Penalties for Teen Sexual Activity, Pew Stateline, May 2, 2017

    May 8, 2017

  • "Many younger African-Americans in their 20s, 30s and 40s are living and dying with chronic conditions that we more typically see in the older population," Cunningham says. "There's still work to do."

    That finding is consistent with previous reports that indicate some black Americans experience a phenomenon known as "weathering." That's when a person develops signs of premature aging and an earlier deterioration in health, the report notes.

    Weathering can be caused by a variety of factors, including living in poverty, living in violent neighborhoods and encountering racism on a regular basis, Betancourt says.

    "Racism and experiencing racism — thinking about your race every day — contributes to this weathering effect," he says. "You're in fight-or-flight mode. That has a real significant biological effect that contributes to premature aging."

    Death Rate Among Black Americans Declines, Especially For Elderly People, All Things Considered (NPR), May 2, 2017

    May 4, 2017

  • Pharmacovigilance is the science and activities relating to the detection, assessment, understanding and prevention of adverse effects or any other medicine-related problem. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) coordinates the European Union (EU) pharmacovigilance system and operates services and processes to support pharmacovigilance in the EU.
    European Medicines Agency Pharmacovigilance

    April 26, 2017

  • In 2010, many major companies filed prepackaged or prearranged bankruptcies rather than conventional ones. A 2011 AlixPartners survey of bankruptcy professionals predicted that more than half of the large company filings over the coming year would be prepacks, and that prepackaged bankruptcy filings would continue in significant numbers in the ensuing years as well.1 For parties seeking to restructure a company quickly, a prepackaged plan of reorganization can be a powerful and effective tool that provides distinct advantages over both a conventional bankruptcy filing and an out-of-court restructuring. Most notably, a prepack may offer a company the fastest route to restructure through bankruptcy and obtain at least some (though not all) of the benefits potentially offered to companies in a conventional bankruptcy under title 11 of the U.S. Code (the Bankruptcy Code).

    Unlike a conventional bankruptcy, in a prepack nearly all negotiation takes place out of the public eye and without the oversight of any bankruptcy court, the Office of the U.S. Trustee or a creditors' committee.

    Paul Basta et al., A Practitioner's Guide to Pre-Packaged Bankruptcy: A Primer (American Bankruptcy Institute), p. 1

    April 19, 2017

  • In 2010, many major companies filed prepackaged or prearranged bankruptcies rather than conventional ones. A 2011 AlixPartners survey of bankruptcy professionals predicted that more than half of the large company filings over the coming year would be prepacks, and that prepackaged bankruptcy filings would continue in significant numbers in the ensuing years as well.1 For parties seeking to restructure a company quickly, a prepackaged plan of reorganization can be a powerful and effective tool that provides distinct advantages over both a conventional bankruptcy filing and an out-of-court restructuring. Most notably, a prepack may offer a company the fastest route to restructure through bankruptcy and obtain at least some (though not all) of the benefits potentially offered to companies in a conventional bankruptcy under title 11 of the U.S. Code (the Bankruptcy Code).

    Unlike a conventional bankruptcy, in a prepack nearly all negotiation takes place out of the public eye and without the oversight of any bankruptcy court, the Office of the U.S. Trustee or a creditors' committee.

    Paul Basta et al., A Practitioner's Guide to Pre-Packaged Bankruptcy: A Primer (American Bankruptcy Institute), p. 1

    April 19, 2017

  • In 2010, many major companies filed prepackaged or prearranged bankruptcies rather than conventional ones. A 2011 AlixPartners survey of bankruptcy professionals predicted that more than half of the large company filings over the coming year would be prepacks, and that prepackaged bankruptcy filings would continue in significant numbers in the ensuing years as well.1 For parties seeking to restructure a company quickly, a prepackaged plan of reorganization can be a powerful and effective tool that provides distinct advantages over both a conventional bankruptcy filing and an out-of-court restructuring. Most notably, a prepack may offer a company the fastest route to restructure through bankruptcy and obtain at least some (though not all) of the benefits potentially offered to companies in a conventional bankruptcy under title 11 of the U.S. Code (the Bankruptcy Code).

    Unlike a conventional bankruptcy, in a prepack nearly all negotiation takes place out of the public eye and without the oversight of any bankruptcy court, the Office of the U.S. Trustee or a creditors' committee.

    Paul Basta et al., A Practitioner's Guide to Pre-Packaged Bankruptcy: A Primer (American Bankruptcy Institute), p. 1

    April 19, 2017

  • In 2010, many major companies filed prepackaged or prearranged bankruptcies rather than conventional ones. A 2011 AlixPartners survey of bankruptcy professionals predicted that more than half of the large company filings over the coming year would be prepacks, and that prepackaged bankruptcy filings would continue in significant numbers in the ensuing years as well.1 For parties seeking to restructure a company quickly, a prepackaged plan of reorganization can be a powerful and effective tool that provides distinct advantages over both a conventional bankruptcy filing and an out-of-court restructuring. Most notably, a prepack may offer a company the fastest route to restructure through bankruptcy and obtain at least some (though not all) of the benefits potentially offered to companies in a conventional bankruptcy under title 11 of the U.S. Code (the Bankruptcy Code).

    Unlike a conventional bankruptcy, in a prepack nearly all negotiation takes place out of the public eye and without the oversight of any bankruptcy court, the Office of the U.S. Trustee or a creditors' committee.

    Paul Basta et al., A Practitioner's Guide to Pre-Packaged Bankruptcy: A Primer (American Bankruptcy Institute), p. 1

    April 19, 2017

  • Every day in this country students come to school without a way to pay for lunch. Right now it's up to the school to decide what happens next.

    Since new legislation out of New Mexico on so-called lunch shaming made headlines, we've heard a lot about how schools react.

    Some provide kids an alternative lunch, like a cold cheese sandwich. Other schools sometimes will provide hot lunch, but require students do chores, have their hand stamped or wear a wristband showing they're behind in payment. And, some schools will deny students lunch all together.

    Megan Kamerick, Schools Will Soon Have To Put In Writing If They 'Lunch Shame', All Things Considered, NPR, April 17, 2017

    April 18, 2017

  • A spit hood, spit mask, mesh hood or spit guards is a restraint device aiming to prevent someone to spit at, or bite, someone or something.

    Proponents, often including police unions and associations, say the spit hoods can help protect personnel from exposure to risk of serious infection like hepatitis and that in London, 59% of injecting drug users test positive for Hepatitis C.

    The spit hoods have been criticised for breaching human rights guidelines and critics call the hoods primitive, cruel and degrading. Some British police chiefs privately expressed concerns that the hoods are reminiscent of hoods used at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp. A decision by the Metropolitan Police Service in London to start using spit hoods was condemned by the human rights group Amnesty International, the civil rights group Liberty and the campaign group Inquest. Many major British police forces have chosen to outlaw spit hoods.

    Spit hoods can be life threatening when someone is pushed to the ground. Half of those dying when restrained die from lack of oxygen, and any obstacle to breathing should be avoided.

    Spit hood, Wikipedia (footnotes omitted)

    April 17, 2017

  • A spit hood, spit mask, mesh hood or spit guards is a restraint device aiming to prevent someone to spit at, or bite, someone or something.

    Proponents, often including police unions and associations, say the spit hoods can help protect personnel from exposure to risk of serious infection like hepatitis and that in London, 59% of injecting drug users test positive for Hepatitis C.

    The spit hoods have been criticised for breaching human rights guidelines and critics call the hoods primitive, cruel and degrading. Some British police chiefs privately expressed concerns that the hoods are reminiscent of hoods used at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp. A decision by the Metropolitan Police Service in London to start using spit hoods was condemned by the human rights group Amnesty International, the civil rights group Liberty and the campaign group Inquest. Many major British police forces have chosen to outlaw spit hoods.

    Spit hoods can be life threatening when someone is pushed to the ground. Half of those dying when restrained die from lack of oxygen, and any obstacle to breathing should be avoided.

    Spit hood, Wikipedia (footnotes omitted)

    April 17, 2017

  • A spit hood, spit mask, mesh hood or spit guards is a restraint device aiming to prevent someone to spit at, or bite, someone or something.

    Proponents, often including police unions and associations, say the spit hoods can help protect personnel from exposure to risk of serious infection like hepatitis and that in London, 59% of injecting drug users test positive for Hepatitis C.

    The spit hoods have been criticised for breaching human rights guidelines and critics call the hoods primitive, cruel and degrading. Some British police chiefs privately expressed concerns that the hoods are reminiscent of hoods used at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp. A decision by the Metropolitan Police Service in London to start using spit hoods was condemned by the human rights group Amnesty International, the civil rights group Liberty and the campaign group Inquest. Many major British police forces have chosen to outlaw spit hoods.

    Spit hoods can be life threatening when someone is pushed to the ground. Half of those dying when restrained die from lack of oxygen, and any obstacle to breathing should be avoided.

    Spit hood, Wikipedia (footnotes omitted)

    April 17, 2017

  • A spit hood, spit mask, mesh hood or spit guards is a restraint device aiming to prevent someone to spit at, or bite, someone or something.

    Proponents, often including police unions and associations, say the spit hoods can help protect personnel from exposure to risk of serious infection like hepatitis and that in London, 59% of injecting drug users test positive for Hepatitis C.

    The spit hoods have been criticised for breaching human rights guidelines and critics call the hoods primitive, cruel and degrading. Some British police chiefs privately expressed concerns that the hoods are reminiscent of hoods used at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp. A decision by the Metropolitan Police Service in London to start using spit hoods was condemned by the human rights group Amnesty International, the civil rights group Liberty and the campaign group Inquest. Many major British police forces have chosen to outlaw spit hoods.

    Spit hoods can be life threatening when someone is pushed to the ground. Half of those dying when restrained die from lack of oxygen, and any obstacle to breathing should be avoided.

    Spit hood, Wikipedia (footnotes omitted)

    April 17, 2017

  • A spit hood,1 spit mask, mesh hood1 or spit guards1 is a restraint device aiming to prevent someone to spit at, or bite, someone or something.1

    Proponents, often including police unions and associations, say the spit hoods can help protect personnel from exposure to risk of serious infection like hepatitis1 and that in London, 59% of injecting drug users test positive for Hepatitis C.2

    The spit hoods have been criticised for breaching human rights guidelines and critics call the hoods primitive, cruel and degrading.1 Some British police chiefs privately expressed concerns that the hoods are reminiscent of hoods used at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp.1 A decision by the Metropolitan Police Service in London to start using spit hoods was condemned by the human rights group Amnesty International, the civil rights group Liberty and the campaign group Inquest.1 Many major British police forces have chosen to outlaw spit hoods.1

    Spit hoods can be life threatening when someone is pushed to the ground. Half of those dying when restrained die from lack of oxygen, and any obstacle to breathing should be avoided.3

    Spit hood, Wikipedia (footnotes omitted)

    April 17, 2017

  • A spit hood, spit mask, mesh hood or spit guards is a restraint device aiming to prevent someone to spit at, or bite, someone or something.

    Proponents, often including police unions and associations, say the spit hoods can help protect personnel from exposure to risk of serious infection like hepatitis and that in London, 59% of injecting drug users test positive for Hepatitis C.

    The spit hoods have been criticised for breaching human rights guidelines and critics call the hoods primitive, cruel and degrading.1 Some British police chiefs privately expressed concerns that the hoods are reminiscent of hoods used at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp. A decision by the Metropolitan Police Service in London to start using spit hoods was condemned by the human rights group Amnesty International, the civil rights group Liberty and the campaign group Inquest. Many major British police forces have chosen to outlaw spit hoods.

    Spit hoods can be life threatening when someone is pushed to the ground. Half of those dying when restrained die from lack of oxygen, and any obstacle to breathing should be avoided.

    Spit hood, Wikipedia (footnotes omitted)

    April 17, 2017

  • Doctors say parasitic twins — asymmetric conjoined twins in which one depends on the other's bodily functions — are extremely rare. Even more uncommon are parasitic rachipagus twins, twins connected at the spine.
    Lindsey Bever, A 10-month-old girl had a parasitic twin protruding from her back — until surgeons removed it, Wash. Post, March 25, 2017

    March 28, 2017

  • Doctors say parasitic twins — asymmetric conjoined twins in which one depends on the other's bodily functions — are extremely rare. Even more uncommon are parasitic rachipagus twins, twins connected at the spine.
    Lindsey Bever, A 10-month-old girl had a parasitic twin protruding from her back — until surgeons removed it, Wash. Post, March 25, 2017

    March 28, 2017

  • Doctors say parasitic twins — asymmetric conjoined twins in which one depends on the other's bodily functions — are extremely rare. Even more uncommon are parasitic rachipagus twins, twins connected at the spine.
    Lindsey Bever, A 10-month-old girl had a parasitic twin protruding from her back — until surgeons removed it, Wash. Post, March 25, 2017

    March 28, 2017

  • "When he saw me, it wasn’t a traditional handshake,” said Barrett, founder and CEO of the KLEO Community Family Life Center, which sits near the library site. “It was actually a dap, where we shook hands and patted on the back at the same time."

    Wash. Post, March 26, 2017

    March 26, 2017

  • Young adults hold immense potential as they transition from adolescence and dependence to adulthood and self-sufficiency. Unfortunately, young African Americans also struggle under the lack of economic opportunities. Disconnected youth are teenagers and young adults between the ages of 16 and 24 who lack a connection to either the education system or labor force. The rate of disconnected youth is highest among African-American youth at 21.6 percent. In nine metro areas, at least 25 percent of Black youth are disconnected from school and work. Disconnected youth not only face their own economic difficulties, but also pose an economic cost to taxpayers, with one estimate as high as $1.56 trillion for the lifetime of disconnected youth. It is worth noting that it is cheaper to prevent disconnection in the first place through quality preschool and K-12 education.

    Congressional Black Caucus, We Have a Lot to Lose: Solutions to Advance Black Families bin the 21st Century (March 2017), pp. 42-43

    March 25, 2017

  • Young adults hold immense potential as they transition from adolescence and dependence to adulthood and self-sufficiency. Unfortunately, young African Americans also struggle under the lack of economic opportunities. Disconnected youth are teenagers and young adults between the ages of 16 and 24 who lack a connection to either the education system or labor force. The rate of disconnected youth is highest among African-American youth at 21.6 percent. In nine metro areas, at least 25 percent of Black youth are disconnected from school and work. Disconnected youth not only face their own economic difficulties, but also pose an economic cost to taxpayers, with one estimate as high as $1.56 trillion for the lifetime of disconnected youth. It is worth noting that it is cheaper to prevent disconnection in the first place through quality preschool and K-12 education.

    Congressional Black Caucus, We Have a Lot to Lose: Solutions to Advance Black Families bin the 21st Century (March 2017), pp. 42-43

    March 25, 2017

  • Uber, like so many other successful tech companies in 2017, is a “platform business,” one built around matchmaking between vendors and customers. If successful, a platform creates its own marketplace; if extremely successful, it ends up controlling something closer to an entire economy. This is intuitive in a case like eBay, which connects buyers and sellers. Airbnb, too, resembles an age-old form of commerce, connecting property owners with short-term lodgers. TaskRabbit and Fiverr connect contractors with people looking to hire them. Some of the largest platforms are less obviously transactional: Facebook and Google connect advertisers with users, users with one another, software developers with users. But while the transactions that happen on their platforms largely take a different form — taps, shares, ads served and scrolled past — the principles are essentially the same, as are the benefits. These businesses are asset- and employee-light, low on liability and high on upside. They aspire to monopoly, often unapologetically, and have been instrumental in rehabilitating the concept.
    John Herrmann, Platform Companies Are Becoming More Powerful — but What Exactly Do They Want?, N.Y. Times Magazine, March 21, 2017

    March 22, 2017

  • Uber, like so many other successful tech companies in 2017, is a “platform business,” one built around matchmaking between vendors and customers. If successful, a platform creates its own marketplace; if extremely successful, it ends up controlling something closer to an entire economy. This is intuitive in a case like eBay, which connects buyers and sellers. Airbnb, too, resembles an age-old form of commerce, connecting property owners with short-term lodgers. TaskRabbit and Fiverr connect contractors with people looking to hire them. Some of the largest platforms are less obviously transactional: Facebook and Google connect advertisers with users, users with one another, software developers with users. But while the transactions that happen on their platforms largely take a different form — taps, shares, ads served and scrolled past — the principles are essentially the same, as are the benefits. These businesses are asset- and employee-light, low on liability and high on upside. They aspire to monopoly, often unapologetically, and have been instrumental in rehabilitating the concept.
    John Herrmann, Platform Companies Are Becoming More Powerful — but What Exactly Do They Want?, N.Y. Times Magazine, March 21, 2017

    March 22, 2017

  • As an ethologist (a scientist who studies animal behaviour), he's chosen to work with goats because they're neophilic. That is, when presented with a novel situation (like the specially constructed equipment he uses in various experiments), they're less inclined to just ignore the experiment and cower in the corner than, say, sheep. This curiosity makes them interesting from a cognitive point of view and easier to study.
    Thomas Thwaites, GoatMan: How I Took a Holiday from Being Human (New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2016), Kindle loc. 1126

    March 6, 2017

  • As an ethologist (a scientist who studies animal behaviour), he's chosen to work with goats because they're neophilic. That is, when presented with a novel situation (like the specially constructed equipment he uses in various experiments), they're less inclined to just ignore the experiment and cower in the corner than, say, sheep. This curiosity makes them interesting from a cognitive point of view and easier to study.
    Thomas Thwaites, GoatMan: How I Took a Holiday from Being Human (New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2016), Kindle loc. 1126

    March 6, 2017

  • 1. The director or chair of a department (including departmental-level programs) is responsible to the dean of a school or college for the educational and administrative affairs of the department. In administrative matters, the director or chair:

    A. Is the representative, through the dean, of the President and also of the department faculty, and

    B. Is responsible for observance of the policies of the University by the department.

    2. The director or chair shall preside at the meetings of the department.

    3. In accord with established procedures, . . . the director or chair:

    A. Prepares and transmits to the dean the recommendations of the department, and any separate recommendations, upon matters of personnel and budget;

    B. Evaluates the educational activities of the department, formulates plans for its future development, and transmits these evaluations and plans to the dean for appropriate action; and

    C. Keeps the dean informed of all departmental matters of concern to the college or school.

    . . .

    Univ. of Washington Executive Order No. I (May 31, 1956; Feb. 21, 1978)

    February 27, 2017

  • Centuries ago, Japan created a word called ubasute. Translated as "granny dumping," it described the practice of poor citizens bringing their senile elders to mountaintops because they can no longer afford their care.

    Today, amid Japan's widespread demographic and economic woes, ubasute is making a comeback.

    Modern-day granny dumping doesn't involve hauling seniors up the sides of mountains, but driving them to hospitals or the offices of nearby charities and, essentially, giving them up for adoption.

    Chris Weller, people who can't afford elder care are reviving a practice known as 'granny dumping', Business Insider, Jan. 30, 2017

    February 7, 2017

  • “We've had the safety net programs a lot longer than we've had the term,” says Guian McKee, a historian at the University of Virginia.

    McKee trawled through newspaper archives to see when the phrase “safety net” first started showing up to describe government social programs. The first reference he could find was in 1966, in a New York Times article about the New York Governor’s race. One of the candidates used the phrase to describe his approach to social spending, saying “public assistance will be envisaged as a safety net on the one hand, and as a transmission belt to productive employment on the other.”

    Ironically, the candidate who said it was Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jr., FDR’s son.

    But the “safety net” still didn't really become a household term in the way we know it now, for another fifteen years.

    February 18, 1981 to be exact, in President Ronald Reagan's first speech to Congress. He was in the midst of laying out big and controversial federal spending cuts he wanted to make,

    * * *

    “All those with true need can rest assured that the social safety net of programs they depend on are exempt from any cuts,” he said. Then he went on, “But government will not continue to subsidize individuals or business interests where real need cannot be demonstrated.”

    And in those two sentences, Reagan popularized a vivid metaphor for government assistance, while at the same time redefining who deserved it.

    Krissy Clark, How did the social safety net get its name?, Marketplace, April 2, 2013.

    January 29, 2017

  • “We've had the safety net programs a lot longer than we've had the term,” says Guian McKee, a historian at the University of Virginia.

    McKee trawled through newspaper archives to see when the phrase “safety net” first started showing up to describe government social programs. The first reference he could find was in 1966, in a New York Times article about the New York Governor’s race. One of the candidates used the phrase to describe his approach to social spending, saying “public assistance will be envisaged as a safety net on the one hand, and as a transmission belt to productive employment on the other.”

    Ironically, the candidate who said it was Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jr., FDR’s son.

    But the “safety net” still didn't really become a household term in the way we know it now, for another fifteen years.

    February 18, 1981 to be exact, in President Ronald Reagan's first speech to Congress. He was in the midst of laying out big and controversial federal spending cuts he wanted to make,

    * * *

    “All those with true need can rest assured that the social safety net of programs they depend on are exempt from any cuts,” he said. Then he went on, “But government will not continue to subsidize individuals or business interests where real need cannot be demonstrated.”

    And in those two sentences, Reagan popularized a vivid metaphor for government assistance, while at the same time redefining who deserved it.

    Krissy Clark, How did the social safety net get its name?, Marketplace, April 2, 2013.

    January 29, 2017

  • GoFundMe is filled with people desperately seeking money to bury their dead. In England, this is called funeral poverty and it’s agonizing.
    Brooke Gladstone, "Busted" #4: When the Safety Net Doesn't Catch You, Jan. 17, 2017

    January 29, 2017

  • We’ve used this phrase so many times in the past two months that it’s almost lost meaning — partly because it can mean so many different things. Depending on who you talk to, “fake news" may refer to satirical news, hoaxes, news that’s clumsily framed or outright wrong, propaganda, lies destined for viral clicks and advertising dollars, politically motivated half-truths, and more.
    Brooke Borel, Fact-Checking Won’t Save Us From Fake News, FiveThirtyEight, Jan. 4, 2017

    January 6, 2017

  • As a point of clarification, it should be noted that this article is about “leximetrics” and not “econometrics”. “Leximetrics” can be understood as every quantitative measurement of law. To be sure, the coding of shareholder rights can be the first part of an econometric study which seeks to find correlations between legal and economic data. Since this will, however, be part of a further study,6 this article analyses only the quantification of the law on shareholder protection in different countries.
    Lele, Priya and Siems, Mathias M., Shareholder Protection: A Leximetric Approach. University of Cambridge, CBR Working Paper No 324. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=897479

    January 5, 2017

  • Street Theatre or the Nukkad Natak, as it is locally known, is perhaps India’s most ancient form of entertainment. Since time immemorial, we’ve had motley crowds of people gathered around street performers at the street corner. Street theatre is perhaps the most effective way to combine live action before a live audience, and get instantaneous responses.

    It is not without reason that the Nukkad Natak is used far and wide to spread awareness on social issues. For how else can conscious citizens voice matters to their friends?

    Yet, the Nukkad Natak also offers avenues for wholesome entertainment. It combines group performances with live acting and hearty song-and-dance sequences.Little wonder then, that an enthralled audience often bursts into a round of applause right in the middle of the street!

    Street Plays in India: An Introduction to the 'Nukkad Natak', Everybody Plays (July 28, 2012)

    I looked this up after reading:

    The Centre will be regularly uploading videos in the form of skits, plays and nukkad nataks to be performed by the students of the Institute of Law, Nirma University so that it could sensitize the audience and be understood by a larger audience and they may share and forward this as media for spreading awareness in the different sections of the society.

    Nirma University Institute of Law, Centre for Law & Governance

    December 30, 2016

  • On 26 January 1662, Samuel Pepys is thankful that he has kept his resolve with a seventeenth century dry January. If the old ones really are the best, why not follow in his footsteps and participate in a January dryathlon?
    9 Literary New Year's Resolutions OUPblog, Dec. 29, 2016

    December 29, 2016

  • See data integrity.

    December 29, 2016

  • <b>Data integrity</b>/security is the quality or condition of being accurate, complete and valid, and not altered or destroyed in an unauthorized manner.
    Boston College Internal Audit Dept., Data Integrity and Security page

    December 29, 2016

  • Data Analysis is the process of systematically applying statistical and/or logical techniques to describe and illustrate, condense and recap, and evaluate data. According to Shamoo and Resnik (2003) various analytic procedures “provide a way of drawing inductive inferences from data and distinguishing the signal (the phenomenon of interest) from the noise (statistical fluctuations) present in the data”..

    While data analysis in qualitative research can include statistical procedures, many times analysis becomes an ongoing iterative process where data is continuously collected and analyzed almost simultaneously. Indeed, researchers generally analyze for patterns in observations through the entire data collection phase (Savenye, Robinson, 2004). The form of the analysis is determined by the specific qualitative approach taken (field study, ethnography content analysis, oral history, biography, unobtrusive research) and the form of the data (field notes, documents, audiotape, videotape).

    An essential component of ensuring data integrity is the accurate and appropriate analysis of research findings. Improper statistical analyses distort scientific findings, mislead casual readers (Shepard, 2002), and may negatively influence the public perception of research. Integrity issues are just as relevant to analysis of non-statistical data as well.

    Northern Illinois University, Faculty Development & Instructional Design Center, Data Analysis

    December 29, 2016

  • Big Data is an umbrella term for a variety of strategies and tactics that involve massive data sets, and technologies that make sense out of these mindboggling reams of data. The Big Data trend has impacted all industries, including the media industry, as new technologies are being developed to automate and simplify the process of data analysis, and as throngs of data analysts are being trained and hired to meet the demand for the analysis of these data.
    Martha L. Stone, Big Data for Media (Nov. 2014) (Univ. of Oxford Reuters Inst. for the Study of Journalism)

    See data journalism.

    December 29, 2016

  • See data journalism.

    December 29, 2016

  • See data journalism.

    December 29, 2016

  • See data journalism.

    December 29, 2016

  • Journalism in the 21st century involves finding, collecting, analyzing and visualizing data for stories. The Journalism School offers foundational courses in data‐driven journalism as well as a two‐semester specialization in data journalism for students interested in advanced skills.
    Columbia Journalism School, Data page

    December 29, 2016

  • What is data journalism? I could answer, simply, that it is journalism done with data. But that doesn’t help much.

    Both ‘data’ and ‘journalism’ are troublesome terms. Some people think of ‘data’ as any collection of numbers, most likely gathered on a spreadsheet. 20 years ago, that was pretty much the only sort of data that journalists dealt with. But we live in a digital world now, a world in which almost anything can be — and almost everything is — described with numbers.

    . . .

    What makes data journalism different to the rest of journalism? Perhaps it is the new possibilities that open up when you combine the traditional ‘nose for news’ and ability to tell a compelling story, with the sheer scale and range of digital information now available.

    And those possibilities can come at any stage of the journalist’s process: using programming to automate the process of gathering and combining information from local government, police, and other civic sources . . . .

    Or using software to find connections between hundreds of thousands of documents . . . .

    Data journalism can help a journalist tell a complex story through engaging infographics. . . . .

    Or it can help explain how a story relates to an individual . . . .

    Data can be the source of data journalism, or it can be the tool with which the story is told — or it can be both. Like any source, it should be treated with scepticism; and like any tool, we should be conscious of how it can shape and restrict the stories that are created with it.

    Paul Bradshaw,

    December 29, 2016

  • Data journalism is not graphics and visualisations. It's about telling the story in the best way possible. Sometimes that will be a visualisation or a map . . . .

    But sometimes it's a news story. Sometimes, just publishing the number is enough.

    If data journalism is about anything, it's the flexibility to search for new ways of storytelling. And more and more reporters are realising that. Suddenly, we have company - and competition. So being a data journalist is no longer unusual.

    It's just journalism.

    Simon Rogers Data journalism at the Guardian: what is it and how do we do it? (July 28, 2011)

    December 29, 2016

  • In today's market, asset management services are distributed to US-based investors primarily through five principal distribution channels: direct, professional advice, retirement plan, supermarket platforms and institutional.

    . . .

    5. Institutional channel. The previous four channels are geared almost exclusively toward retail or mass affluent investors with less than US$10m in net investable assets. In contrast, the institutional channel includes businesses, such as the treasury department of a corporation as well as insurance companies,

    endowments, private family offices, defined benefit pension plans, foundations and universities. The key driver to success in institutional distribution — apart from demonstrating proven performance results — is building solid relationships with the institutions’ designated investment consultants. Because they act as vigilant gate-keepers and decision-makers in allocating assets among different managers, it is essential to win their

    hearts and minds.

    Ernst & Young, Sea of Change on the Horizon: US Fund Distribution 2014 (2014), pp. 5, 8

    December 28, 2016

  • In today's market, asset management services are distributed to US-based investors primarily through five principal distribution channels: direct, professional advice, retirement plan, supermarket platforms and institutional.

    . . .

    4. Supermarket platform channel. The supermarket channel is made up of discount brokers that offer mutual funds from a large number of fund sponsors. This channel includes many no-advice discount brokers that operate almost exclusively online. The most important feature of a fund supermarket is its no-transaction-fee (NTF) program whereby an investor may purchase funds from a wide range of fund companies with no transaction fees. The NTF offerings from a discount broker often number in the thousands, providing an investor the convenience of purchasing no-load funds available from different manufacturers through a single, user-friendly platform. Although initially categorized as a low-margin, no-frills, bare-bones business model targeted at cost-conscious consumers, many of these supermarkets have beefed up

    their client services by offering comprehensive investor education material; a wide selection of financial research; and sophisticated, yet user-friendly, online and mobile tech applications. While the asset manager must pay fees to the distributor for a fund to be listed on a platform, given that most of these platforms operate under a high-volume, low-cost model, the fees are usually lower than the revenue-sharing agreements prevalent in the professional advice channel. However, the old adage “you get what you pay for” applies

    here: the product line from one manager will be thrown into a vast ocean of thousands of different products from dozens, if not hundreds, of other asset management firms — with no dedicated sales support.

    Ernst & Young, Sea of Change on the Horizon: US Fund Distribution 2014 (2014), pp. 5, 7

    December 28, 2016

  • In today's market, asset management services are distributed to US-based investors primarily through five principal distribution channels: direct, professional advice, retirement plan, supermarket platforms and institutional.

    . . .

    4. Supermarket platform channel. The supermarket channel is made up of discount brokers that offer mutual funds from a large number of fund sponsors. This channel includes many no-advice discount brokers that operate almost exclusively online. The most important feature of a fund supermarket is its no-transaction-fee (NTF) program whereby an investor may purchase funds from a wide range of fund companies with no transaction fees. The NTF offerings from a discount broker often number in the thousands, providing an investor the convenience of purchasing no-load funds available from different manufacturers through a single, user-friendly platform. Although initially categorized as a low-margin, no-frills, bare-bones business model targeted at cost-conscious consumers, many of these supermarkets have beefed up

    their client services by offering comprehensive investor education material; a wide selection of financial research; and sophisticated, yet user-friendly, online and mobile tech applications. While the asset manager must pay fees to the distributor for a fund to be listed on a platform, given that most of these platforms operate under a high-volume, low-cost model, the fees are usually lower than the revenue-sharing agreements prevalent in the professional advice channel. However, the old adage “you get what you pay for” applies

    here: the product line from one manager will be thrown into a vast ocean of thousands of different products from dozens, if not hundreds, of other asset management firms — with no dedicated sales support.

    Ernst & Young, Sea of Change on the Horizon: US Fund Distribution 2014 (2014), pp. 5, 7

    December 28, 2016

  • In today's market, asset management services are distributed to US-based investors primarily through five principal distribution channels: direct, professional advice, retirement plan, supermarket platforms and institutional.

    . . .

    4. Supermarket platform channel. The supermarket channel is made up of discount brokers that offer mutual funds from a large number of fund sponsors. This channel includes many no-advice discount brokers that operate almost exclusively online. The most important feature of a fund supermarket is its no-transaction-fee (NTF) program whereby an investor may purchase funds from a wide range of fund companies with no transaction fees. The NTF offerings from a discount broker often number in the thousands, providing an investor the convenience of purchasing no-load funds available from different manufacturers through a single, user-friendly platform. Although initially categorized as a low-margin, no-frills, bare-bones business model targeted at cost-conscious consumers, many of these supermarkets have beefed up

    their client services by offering comprehensive investor education material; a wide selection of financial research; and sophisticated, yet user-friendly, online and mobile tech applications. While the asset manager must pay fees to the distributor for a fund to be listed on a platform, given that most of these platforms operate under a high-volume, low-cost model, the fees are usually lower than the revenue-sharing agreements prevalent in the professional advice channel. However, the old adage “you get what you pay for” applies

    here: the product line from one manager will be thrown into a vast ocean of thousands of different products from dozens, if not hundreds, of other asset management firms — with no dedicated sales support.

    Ernst & Young, Sea of Change on the Horizon: US Fund Distribution 2014 (2014), pp. 5, 7

    December 28, 2016

  • In today's market, asset management services are distributed to US-based investors primarily through five principal distribution channels: direct, professional advice, retirement plan, supermarket platforms and institutional.

    . . .

    4. Supermarket platform channel. The supermarket channel is made up of discount brokers that offer mutual funds from a large number of fund sponsors. This channel includes many no-advice discount brokers that operate almost exclusively online. The most important feature of a fund supermarket is its no-transaction-fee (NTF) program whereby an investor may purchase funds from a wide range of fund companies with no transaction fees. The NTF offerings from a discount broker often number in the thousands, providing an investor the convenience of purchasing no-load funds available from different manufacturers through a single, user-friendly platform. Although initially categorized as a low-margin, no-frills, bare-bones business model targeted at cost-conscious consumers, many of these supermarkets have beefed up

    their client services by offering comprehensive investor education material; a wide selection of financial research; and sophisticated, yet user-friendly, online and mobile tech applications. While the asset manager must pay fees to the distributor for a fund to be listed on a platform, given that most of these platforms operate under a high-volume, low-cost model, the fees are usually lower than the revenue-sharing agreements prevalent in the professional advice channel. However, the old adage “you get what you pay for” applies

    here: the product line from one manager will be thrown into a vast ocean of thousands of different products from dozens, if not hundreds, of other asset management firms — with no dedicated sales support.

    Ernst & Young, Sea of Change on the Horizon: US Fund Distribution 2014 (2014), pp. 5, 7

    December 28, 2016

  • In today's market, asset management services are distributed to US-based investors primarily through five principal distribution channels: direct, professional advice, retirement plan, supermarket platforms and institutional.

    . . .

    3. Retirement plan channel. This is the largest channel and includes primarily corporate 401(k) retirement plans in which beneficiaries choose from a menu of investment product options. With the decline of defined benefit plans in the US, 72% of American households own funds distributed through employer-sponsored retirement plans. Employers sponsoring defined contribution plans rely upon third parties to administer the plans and provide investment options to employees. Third-party administrators (TPAs) effectively act as the outsourced client interface for the fund manager and handle a wide variety of administrative services. As with the case of most distribution channels, because the TPA acts as the interface between client and manufacturer, the manufacturer here is left with limited to zero direct client relationship and limited brand identity.

    Ernst & Young, Sea of Change on the Horizon: US Fund Distribution 2014 (2014), pp. 5, 7

    December 28, 2016

  • In today's market, asset management services are distributed to US-based investors primarily through five principal distribution channels: direct, professional advice, retirement plan, supermarket platforms and institutional.

    . . .

    2. Professional advice channel. In 2012 53% of households owning investment products purchased them through the professional investment advice channel. This includes a very

    broad range of professionals operating under many different titles: financial advisors, private bankers, registered investment advisors, full-service brokers, independent financial planners, investment service representatives of banks and savings institutions, insurance agents and accountants. The most important feature of this channel is the provision of high value-added services to the end client, “high touch” personalization

    and ongoing customized assistance that may include retirement planning, insurance, lending and liquidity solutions, such as secured loans and jumbo mortgages, and even succession planning and tax advice. Most distribution through this channel will require a revenue-sharing agreement where the manager pays a portion of their management fees to the distributor — fees that effectively reduce the manager’s bottom line. While this channel may be the costliest route for asset managers, given that managers usually have limited, if any,

    direct client relationships, it is arguably the most viable channel for successful distribution, particularly for smaller firms that lack the resources to build a national sales network.

    Ernst & Young, Sea of Change on the Horizon: US Fund Distribution 2014 (2014), pp. 5-6

    December 28, 2016

  • In today's market, asset management services are distributed to US-based investors primarily through five principal distribution channels: direct, professional advice, retirement plan, supermarket platforms and institutional.

    1. Direct channel. This channel offers a direct commercial relationship between manufacturer and end client, representing full disintermediataion of the traditional distributor. . . . Fewer than 30% of households in the US that owned funds over the last decade owned funds purchased through the direct market channel.

    Ernst & Young, Sea of Change on the Horizon: US Fund Distribution 2014 (2014), p. 5

    December 28, 2016

  • In today's market, asset management services are distributed to US-based investors primarily through five principal distribution channels: direct, professional advice, retirement plan, supermarket platforms and institutional.

    1. Direct channel. This channel offers a direct commercial relationship between manufacturer and end client, representing full disintermediataion of the traditional distributor. . . . Fewer than 30% of households in the US that owned funds over the last decade owned funds purchased through the direct market channel.

    Ernst & Young, Sea of Change on the Horizon: US Fund Distribution 2014 (2014), p. 5

    December 28, 2016

  • In today's market, asset management services are distributed to US-based investors primarily through five principal distribution channels: direct, professional advice, retirement plan, supermarket platforms and institutional.
    Ernst & Young, Sea of Change on the Horizon: US Fund Distribution 2014 (2014), p. 5

    December 28, 2016

  • And while I agree that one should own a mix of stocks and bonds, I fear many investors, particularly individuals, are being goaded to misdiversify, resulting in higher investment fees, mediocre performance and potentially more risk.
    Kenneth G. Winans, 5 Big Mistakes Investors Make When They Diversify, Forbes (Feb. 5, 2015)

    December 28, 2016

  • "UPREITs" (Umbrella Partnership Real Estate Investment Trusts) are a derivation of the basic REIT structure. They are essentially a combination of a REIT and a partnership. The joining of these two entities allows investors and property contributors not only to enjoy the advantages the basic REIT structure offers, but also to realize additional tax advantages not found in the basic REIT structure. Because of these added benefits, most REITs are now grouped with related partnerships and are organized as UPREITs.

    Chadwick M. Cornell, Comment, REITs and UPREITs: Pushing the Corporate Law Envelope, 145 U. Pa. L. Rev. 1565, 1566 n.6 (1997)

    December 28, 2016

  • "UPREITs" (Umbrella Partnership Real Estate Investment Trusts) are a derivation of the basic REIT structure. They are essentially a combination of a REIT and a partnership. The joining of these two entities allows investors and property contributors not only to enjoy the advantages the basic REIT structure offers, but also to realize additional tax advantages not found in the basic REIT structure. Because of these added benefits, most REITs are now grouped with related partnerships and are organized as UPREITs.

    Chadwick M. Cornell, Comment, REITs and UPREITs: Pushing the Corporate Law Envelope, 145 U. Pa. L. Rev. 1565, 1566 n.6 (1997)

    December 28, 2016

  • Earthquake-induced soil liquefaction (liquefaction) is a leading cause of earthquake damage worldwide. Liquefaction is often described in the literature as the phenomena of seismic generation of excess porewater pressures and consequent softening of granular soils. Many regions in the United States have been witness to liquefaction and its consequences, not just those in the west that people associate with earthquake hazards.
    National Academies Press, State of the Art and Practice in the Assessment of Earthquake-Induced Soil Liquefaction and Its Consequences (2016)

    December 27, 2016

  • Earthquake-induced soil liquefaction (liquefaction) is a leading cause of earthquake damage worldwide. Liquefaction is often described in the literature as the phenomena of seismic generation of excess porewater pressures and consequent softening of granular soils. Many regions in the United States have been witness to liquefaction and its consequences, not just those in the west that people associate with earthquake hazards.
    National Academies Press, State of the Art and Practice in the Assessment of Earthquake-Induced Soil Liquefaction and Its Consequences (2016)

    December 27, 2016

Comments for MaryW

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  • Your citations are inspiring. I’ve been lazy about using the blockquote HTML tag—but no more! Thank you for your precision and dedication.

    November 23, 2018

  • You have an unclosed italic bracket on sung-through which borks the formatting of everything that comes after it on the Community page and on your own comments feed.

    May 23, 2016

  • j/k, no probs about the glitchygloops. Everyone who's been here a while has borked something or another.

    April 5, 2016

  • Should have got a good phone.

    April 5, 2016

  • I hear you about editing from a phone--but don't give up, MaryW! I enjoy your citations.

    April 4, 2016

  • bilby, you must have been right on it. I edited out the extraneous stuff within a minute or so.

    I've learned my lesson: don't try to do much here with my iPhone: it's too hard to proofread and edit.

    April 4, 2016

  • Please take care not to unncessarily include site menus in copy-pasted comments.

    April 4, 2016

  • In many cases "See citation on word" is also a good option.

    February 29, 2016

  • You have an unclosed italic HTML bracket on elytron.

    December 27, 2015