maryw has adopted the words citation, lichenification, kakistocracy, wonderful, department chair, suffrage, cocker spaniel, quadrennial, monozygotic, and neophilic, looked up 0 words, created 3 lists, listed 678 words, written 806 comments, added 0 tags, and loved 25 words.

Comments by maryw

  • Acid mine drainage contains Fe^3+. When it enters a river with higher pH, it precipitates out as an ugly slime called “yellow boy.”
    Larry Gonick & Craig Criddle, The Cartoon Guide to Chemistry (New York: Collins Reference, 2005), p. 173

    July 23, 2019

  • “He knew where I was at all times, who I was talking to on email, text messages, social media—all of it. He could see everything. I had no privacy,” says Anna (not her real name).

    Anna’s experience is not an isolated one: it’s a daily reality for thousands of people, most of them women.

    That’s because, usually without their knowledge, their partners have installed stalkerware on their devices—apps that let someone spy on your smartphone activity.

    Charlotte Jee, How "Stalkerware" Apps Are Letting Abusive Partners Spy on Their Victims, MIT Tech. Rev. (July 10, 2019)

    July 22, 2019

  • He turned to me and waved toward the ironworker in the shop. "Go make clips to fit those purlins."
    Tara Westover, Educated (New York: Random House, 2018), p. 139

    Ironworker is a class of machines that can shear, notch, and punch holes in steel plate. The name is now used to refer to the whole class of machines (made by at least a dozen brands, such as Scotchman, Piranha, GEKA, Edwards, Pedinghaus, Precise Power etc.). If there ever was a brand name, it has now become a genericized trademark. Ironworkers generate force using mechanical advantage or hydraulic systems.
    Wikipedia, Ironworker (machine)

    April 23, 2019

  • There was an unusually hot day that spring, and Luke and I spent it hauling purlins—the iron beams that run horizontally along the length of a roof.
    Tara Westover, Educated (New York: Random House, 2018), p. 135

    April 23, 2019

  • See manlift.

    April 23, 2019

  • Shawn said . . . that if they wanted to land real contracts, they needed to spend real money on real equipment—specifically, a new welder and a man lift with a basket.

    "We can't keep using a forklift and an old cheese pallet," Shawn said. "It looks like shit, and it's dangerous besides."

    Tara Westover, Educated (New York: Random House, 2018), p. 122

    Manlift. A device consisting of a power-driven endless belt moving in one direction only, and provided with steps or platforms and handholds attached to it for the transportation of personnel from floor to floor.
    Occupational Safety and Health Administration, 29 C.F.R. 1910.68(a)(5)

    (4) "Belt manlift" means a power driven endless belt provided with steps or platforms and a hand hold for the transportation of personnel from floor to floor.

    (27) "One-man capacity manlift" means a single passenger, hand-powered counterweighted device, or electric-powered device, that travels vertically in guides and serves two or more landings.

    Revised Code of Washington 70.87.101

    "Aerial manlift equipment" - Equipment such as extended towers, boom-mounted cages or baskets, and truck-mounted ladders, that is primarily designed to place personnel and equipment aloft to work on elevated structures and equipment.
    Washington Administrative Code 296-45-035

    April 23, 2019

  • "There wasn't a part of her that wasn't powdered or lacquered, corseted, draped, and ruched." Amy Bloom, White Houses (New York: Penguin Random House, 2018), p. 160

    April 23, 2019

  • Hawaiians are familiar with the thick haze they call vog, or volcanic smog. When trade winds blow from the northeast, the vog often wraps around the Big Island from Kilauea and settles over the more densely populated western coast. When winds are variable or blow from the south, vog can spread all the way up the Hawaiian isalnd chain to Oahu . . . and beyond.

    Near the active vents, vog is made mostly of sulphur dioxide droplets. Over time and at greater distances, those droplets react with sunlight and chemicals in the air to become more complex sulphur compounds, including sulphuric acid.

    Alexandra Witze & Jeff Kanipe, Island on Fire: The Extraordinary Story of a Forgotten Volcano That Changed the World (New York: Island Books, 2015), ch. 8, p. 173

    February 18, 2019

  • Applied to volcanic flows:

    flows that are relatively dilte — that is not carrying so much debris — can rush up steep slopes, or change direction quickly.
    Alexandra Witze & Jeff Kanipe, Island on Fire: The Extraordinary Story of a Forgotten Volcano That Changed the World (New York: Island Books, 2015), ch. 8, p. 168

    February 18, 2019

  • The main core storage (at the National Ice Core Laboratory in Denver) is at a bone-chilling -38 degrees Celsius — the kind of temperature that renders people what Hargreaves (the curator) calls 'cold-stupid'. Reflexes slow down, talking seems difficult and thinking just as arduous.
    Alexandra Witze & Jeff Kanipe, Island on Fire: The Extraordinary Story of a Forgotten Volcano That Changed the World (New York: Island Books, 2015), ch. 6, p. 136

    February 18, 2019

  • Also telling was how the haze dimmed the light of the stars, a phenomenon astronomers call atmospheric extinction. Barring light pollution, stars can normally be observed in almost every part of the sky, and so they make excellent indicators of a fog's density. Under normal circumstances, the faintest start that can be seen with the unaided eye is rates as a magnitude 6. Brighter stars range between mgnitudes 5 and 1, with 1 being the brightest.
    Alexandra Witze & Jeff Kanipe, Island on Fire: The Extraordinary Story of a Forgotten Volcano That Changed the World (New York: Island Books, 2015), ch. 5, p. 110

    February 18, 2019

  • When Vesuvius exploded, (Pliny the Elder) apparently couldn't believe his luck at having an opportunity to witness such a momentous eruption. He climbed to the highest point he could find and watched the ash cloud develop. Later his nephew (Pliny the Younger) recalled how they saw the plume grow into a shape 'like an umbrella pine, for it rose to a great height on a sort of trunk and then split off into branches, I imagine because it was thrust upwards by the first blast and then left unsupported as the pressure subsided.' This classic, umbrella-like shape forms when a volanic ash plume hits winds going sideways in the upper atmosphere and spreads out. We now use the adjective 'plinian' for this type of ash cloud, after the man who first described it.
    Alexandra Witze & Jeff Kanipe, Island on Fire: The Extraordinary Story of a Forgotten Volcano That Changed the World (New York: Island Books, 2015), ch. 3, p. 72, Kindle loc 824

    February 18, 2019

  • By the time the hotspot reached what is now Yellowstone, it let loose its wrath in three colossal eruptions. All three spread ash and debris—enough ash to fill the Grand Canyon—over nearly the entire western half o fht eUnited States, and left behind colossal craters known as calderas, formed as magma beneath the ground drained out. The most recent eruption happened around 640,000 years ago and was about 2,500 times the size of the 19880 eruption of Mount St. Helens. The oldest of the three Yellowstone blowouts happened 2.1 million years ago and was 6,000 times bigger than Mount St. Helens.

    That makes Yellowstone the quintessential example of a 'supervolcano', a word that has little technical merit but that is helpful for thinking about the relative scale of eruptions. BBC producers coined the term in 2000, to describe planet-altering eruptions that disgorge an immense volume of ash and other rock fragments—as a general rule, the volume of material that settles onto the ground is about two to three times the volue of the magma that fuelled the eruption.

    Alexandra Witze & Jeff Kanipe, Island on Fire: The Extraordinary Story of a Forgotten Volcano That Changed the World (New York: Island Books, 2015), ch. 3, p. 63, Kindle loc 705

    February 18, 2019

  • Tourists flock to Yellowstone for the views . . . . Equally astounding is the park's vast array of geothermal features. 'Paint pots' of burbling mud spray red, white and other vibrant tints across a geological artist's palette.
    Alexandra Witze & Jeff Kanipe, Island on Fire: The Extraordinary Story of a Forgotten Volcano That Changed the World (New York: Island Books, 2015), ch. 3, p. 61, Kindle loc 685

    February 18, 2019

  • Grímsvötn is but a single volcano, but it's the hub of a so-called fissure system, a network of long narrow cracks along which magma can rise to the surface.
    Alexandra Witze & Jeff Kanipe, Island on Fire: The Extraordinary Story of a Forgotten Volcano That Changed the World (New York: Island Books, 2015), ch. 2, p. 59, Kindle loc 666

    February 18, 2019

  • The equivalent of several thousand megawatts of continuous power create a meltwater lake atop the volcano, beneath the overlying ice. When enough water accumulates in the lake,the pressure forces an opening in the ice cap and the water pours out, draining most of the lake in a matter of days. . . . the floods can be immensely powerful, leaving behind 'sand plains' that stretch for kilometre after kilometre all the way to the coast.
    Alexandra Witze & Jeff Kanipe, Island on Fire: The Extraordinary Story of a Forgotten Volcano That Changed the World (New York: Island Books, 2015), ch. 2, p. 59, Kindle loc 662

    February 18, 2019

  • From the Seasteading Institute's FAQs:

    What does seasteading mean?

    The term comes from homesteading, which means making a home for oneself in new, uninhabited places. It generally has associations with self-sufficiency and a frontier lifestyle. Seasteading is reminiscent of that idea, but at sea.

    . . .

    What do you call a seastead?

    We generally refer to a seastead as a community living at sea and largely responsible for setting its own rules and culture. They will likely come in all shapes and sizes. Early seasteads are expected to be near land and have less autonomy.

    February 14, 2019

  • 'The story of Eyjafjallajökull began uneventfully with what Icelanders call a 'tourist' eruption, one that's scenic but not very dangerous.
    Alexandra Witze & Jeff Kanipe, Island on Fire: The Extraordinary Story of a Forgotten Volcano That Changed the World (New York: Island Books, 2015), ch. 2, Kindle loc 622

    Eyjafjallajökull finally roared to life on 20 March. Fire fountains exploded out of a rocky ridge just east of the mountain's ice-covered summit. It was one of the prettiest eruptions in years. During the day, the dusky light of a northern spring noon highlighted the spectacular orange bursts, while at night the cool green glow of the northern lights shimmered overhead. . . .

    Icelanders call this sort of event a 'tourist eruption', and enterprising operators quickly started running daily trips from Reykjavík.

    Id., ch. 9, Kindle loc 2245

    February 10, 2019

  • In a mantle plume, a jet of volcanic heat fuels a constant, massive outpouring of lava on the seafloor. Scientists think that a few dozen mantle plumes dot the planet, of which the Hawaiian Islands are the most famous example.
    Alexandra Witze & Jeff Kanipe, Island on Fire: The Extraordinary Story of a Forgotten Volcano That Changed the World (New York: Island Books, 2015), ch. 2, Kindle loc 509

    February 10, 2019

  • Harry Hess of Princeton revived Wegener's ideas. . . . In 1962 he published what he called an 'essay in geopoetry', written two years earlier. It proposed that heat churning through the Earth's mantle might be responsible for the movement of the plates.
    Alexandra Witze & Jeff Kanipe, Island on Fire: The Extraordinary Story of a Forgotten Volcano That Changed the World (New York: Island Books, 2015), ch. 2, Kindle loc 454

    February 10, 2019

  • Cinders fell from the sky on the 14th. They were, Jón (Steingrímsson) wrote, 'blue-black and shiny, as long and thick around as a seal's hair'. This was the first description of what volcanologists today refer to as Pele's hair—thin strands of volcanic glass formed by molten particles ejected in a lava fountain and stretched into fibres as they are carried through the air. Just half a millimetre across, they may be as long as two metres. The unusual fallout covered the ground across the region, and the winds worked some of the hairs into long hollow coils.
    Alexandra Witze & Jeff Kanipe, Island on Fire: The Extraordinary Story of a Forgotten Volcano That Changed the World (New York: Island Books, 2015), ch. 1, Kindle loc 357

    February 10, 2019

  • pignut

    February 10, 2019

  • small coin:

    "There ain't a thing left here," said Merry, still feeling round among the bones, "not a copper doit nor a baccy box."
    Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island (1883), ch. 31

    February 10, 2019

  • adv. all at once Merriam-Webster

    "I'll take it on my shoulders, holus bolus, blame and shame, my boy; but stay here, I cannot let you."
    Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island (1883), ch. 30

    February 10, 2019

  • "the whole blessed boat, from cross-trees to kelson."

    Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island (1883), ch. 28

    February 10, 2019

  • to irritate or cause pain

    I went below and did what I could for my wound; it pained me a good deal and still bled freely, but it was neither deep nor dangerous, nor did it greatly gall me when I used my arm.
    Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island (1883), ch. 27

    February 10, 2019

  • In the sense of ripples on the water:

    "Now," said Hands,"look there; there's a pet bit for to beach a ship in. Fine flat sand, never a cat's paw, trees all around of it, and flowers a-blowing like a garding (garden) on that old ship."
    Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island (1883), ch. 26

    February 10, 2019

  • knife:

    One cut with my sea-gully and the HISPANIOLA would go humming down the tide.
    Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island (1883), ch. 23

    February 10, 2019

  • the little gallipot of a boat that we were in was gravely overloaded.

    Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island (1883), ch. 17

    February 10, 2019

  • Nautical sense:

    We had a dreary morning's work before us, for there was no sign of any wind, and the boats had to be got out and manned and the ship warped three or four miles round the corner of the island and up the narrow passage to the haven behind Skeleton Island.
    Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island (1883), ch. 13

    February 10, 2019

  • "Here it is about gentlemen of fortune. They lives rough, and they risk swinging,, but they eat and drink like fighting-cocks, and when a cruise is done, why, it's hundreds of pounds instead of hundreds of farthings in their pockets. . . .

    "a finer figurehead for a gentleman of fortune I never clapped my eyes on."

    By this time I had begun to understand the meaning of their terms. By a "gentleman of fortune" they plainly meant neither more nor less than a common pirate . . . .

    Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island (1883), ch. 11

    February 10, 2019

  • "how long are we a-going to stand off and on like a blessed bumboat?"
    Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island (1883), ch. 11

    February 10, 2019

  • In Treasure Island (Robert Louis Stevenson, 1883), the pirates use "deadlights" to mean "eyes."

    "The same broadside I lost my leg, old Pew lost his deadlights." -- ch. 11

    "I saw him dead with these here deadlights." -- ch. 31

    February 10, 2019

  • "Now treasure is ticklish work; I don't like treasure voyages on any account, and I don't like them above all, when they are secret and when (begging your pardon, Mr. Trelawney) the secret has been told to the parrot."

    "Silver's parrot?" asked the squire.

    "It's a way of speaking," said the captain. "Blabbed, I mean."

    Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island (1883), ch. 9

    February 10, 2019

  • "hair" meaning:

    the doctor, as if to hear the better, had taken off his powdered wig and sat there looking very strange indeed with his own close-cropped black poll.
    Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island (1883), ch. 6

    February 10, 2019

  • I went back with him to the Admiral Benbow, and you cannot imagine a house in such a state of smash; the very clock had been thrown down by these fellows in their furious hunt after my mother and myself; and though nothing had actually been taken away except the captain's money-bag and a little silver from the till, I could see at once that we were ruined.
    Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island (1883), ch. 5

    February 10, 2019

  • I went back with him to the Admiral Benbow, and you cannot imagine a house in such a state of smash; the very clock had been thrown down by these fellows in their furious hunt after my mother and myself; and though nothing had actually been taken away except the captain's money-bag and a little silver from the till, I could see at once that we were ruined.
    Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island (1883), ch. 5

    February 10, 2019

  • Merry tumbled head foremost into the excavation; the man with the bandage spun round like a teetotum and fell all his length upon his side, where he lay dead, but still twitching; and the other three turned and ran for it with all their might.
    Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island (1883), ch. 33

    February 10, 2019

  • }”Don’t assume that everyone knows what a hotep is,” he told a student who had written about an encounter at a barbershop with an exemplar of the type, a man whose Afrocentrism was mixed with regressive sanctimony. “Hoteps are pro-black but anti-progress,” James explained to the class. “They’re stunningly sexist. Your favorite rapper is probably a hotep. He also might be gay.”
    Jia Tolentino,The Book of Spirits, New Yorker (Jan. 28, 2019) (quoting Marlon James)

    February 8, 2019

  • In Australia, one company recently started selling a greener alternative. Aquamation Industries claims to offer a unique, cheaper, more carbon-neutral method of body disposal. Aquamation employs a process called alkaline hydrolysis, in which a body is placed in a stainless-steel vat containing a 200°F (93°C) potassium-hydroxide-and-water solution for four hours until all that remains is the skeleton. The bones, which are soft at that point, are then crushed and presented to the deceased's family. The residual liquid contains no DNA, and the procedure uses only 5% to 10% of the energy that cremation uses, says John Humphries, a former funeral-home director who is now the chief executive of Aquamation Industries, which launched its services in August. According to Humphries, Aquamation accelerates the processes that occur in nature.
    Marina Kamenev, Aquamation: A Greener Alternative to Cremation?, Time (September. 28, 2010)

    February 7, 2019

  • The other night, Feeley hosted one of her last lessons on the trapeze rigging in her apartment. Her student was Violet Oliphant O’Neill, an artist who paints large-scale backdrops for photographers. Feeley sat inside the steel hoop, called a lyra, in a black onesie with a skeleton design.
    Gabriel Packard, Little Big Top, New Yorker (Jan. 28, 2019)

    February 4, 2019

  • "Yeah. So that was a bit spinny!" she tells me with classic understatement. Be clear. When Sandra says that something was "a bit spinny" or "freaky" or "eerie," or "a bit of a rocky road" or "scary Mary," what she means is that a pit cracked open beneath her feet, dropping her straight into the liquid center of the earth."
    Sarah Krasnostein, The Trauma Cleaner: One Woman's Extraordinary Life in the Business of Death, Decay, and Disaster (New York: St. Martin's Press, 2017), ch. 15

    (The speaker is Australian.)

    January 28, 2019

  • "Yeah. So that was a bit spinny!" she tells me with classic understatement. Be clear. When Sandra says that something was "a bit spinny" or "freaky" or "eerie," or "a bit of a rocky road" or "scary Mary," what she means is that a pit cracked open beneath her feet, dropping her straight into the liquid center of the earth."
    Sarah Krasnostein, The Trauma Cleaner: One Woman's Extraordinary Life in the Business of Death, Decay, and Disaster (New York: St. Martin's Press, 2017), ch. 15

    (The speaker is Australian.)

    January 28, 2019

  • "Yeah. So that was a bit spinny!" she tells me with classic understatement. Be clear. When Sandra says that something was "a bit spinny" or "freaky" or "eerie," or "a bit of a rocky road" or "scary Mary," what she means is that a pit cracked open beneath her feet, dropping her straight into the liquid center of the earth."
    Sarah Krasnostein, The Trauma Cleaner: One Woman's Extraordinary Life in the Business of Death, Decay, and Disaster (New York: St. Martin's Press, 2017), ch. 15

    (The speaker is Australian.)

    January 28, 2019

  • After the polls close, she stays up drinking scotch with the television turned up, trying to stay away from the phone while the votes are being counted. An early tip from the scrutineers has her in the lead, but the official call comes in at midnight. She has lost the seat by a small margin.
    Sarah Krasnostein, The Trauma Cleaner: One Woman's Extraordinary Life in the Business of Death, Decay, and Disaster (New York: St. Martin's Press, 2017), ch. 15

    (The events take place in Australia. I've never heard this term in the US.)

    January 28, 2019

  • "They still had the shit-carters in those days, because you didn't have sewerage," Sandra adds. "That's where the old saying comes from: as flat as a shit-carter's hat."

    "I think ours used to carry it on his shoulder, Marilyn muses.

    Sarah Krasnostein, The Trauma Cleaner: One Woman's Extraordinary Life in the Business of Death, Decay, and Disaster (New York: St. Martin's Press, 2017), ch. 14

    January 28, 2019

  • Marilyn vigorously motions to the cleaner to hand over a plastic bag full of deliquescing apples and oranges extracted from the bathroom.
    Sarah Krasnostein, The Trauma Cleaner: One Woman's Extraordinary Life in the Business of Death, Decay, and Disaster (New York: St. Martin's Press, 2017), ch. 14

    January 28, 2019

  • Most people will never turn their minds to the notion of trauma cleaning, but once they realize that it exists—that it obviously has to—they will probably be surprised to learn that the police do not do trauma cleanup. Neither do firefighters or ambulances or other emergency services. This is why Sandra's trauma work is varied and includes crime scenes, floods, and fires. In addition, government housing and mental health agencies, real estate agents, community organizations, executors of deceased estates, and private individuals all call on Sandra to deal with unattended deaths, suicides, or cases of long-term property neglect where homes have, in her words, "fallen into disrepute" due to the occupier's mental illness, aging, or physical disability.
    Sarah Krasnostein, The Trauma Cleaner: One Woman's Extraordinary Life in the Business of Death, Decay, and Disaster (New York: St. Martin's Press, 2017), ch. 1

    On the surface, trauma cleaning as a career may have a darkly attractive quirkiness, but the reality is that it is dirty, disturbing, backbreaking physical labor of transcendentally exhausting proportions.
    Id., ch. 8.

    January 28, 2019

  • Most people will never turn their minds to the notion of trauma cleaning, but once they realize that it exists—that it obviously has to—they will probably be surprised to learn that the police do not do trauma cleanup. Neither do firefighters or ambulances or other emergency services. This is why Sandra's trauma work is varied and includes crime scenes, floods, and fires. In addition, government housing and mental health agencies, real estate agents, community organizations, executors of deceased estates, and private individuals all call on Sandra to deal with unattended deaths, suicides, or cases of long-term property neglect where homes have, in her words, "fallen into disrepute" due to the occupier's mental illness, aging, or physical disability.
    Sarah Krasnostein, The Trauma Cleaner: One Woman's Extraordinary Life in the Business of Death, Decay, and Disaster (New York: St. Martin's Press, 2017), ch. 1

    On the surface, trauma cleaning as a career may have a darkly attractive quirkiness, but the reality is that it is dirty, disturbing, backbreaking physical labor of transcendentally exhausting proportions.
    Id., ch. 8.

    January 28, 2019

  • Both cloud computing and fog computing provide storage, applications, and data to end-users. However, fog computing has a closer proximity to end-users and bigger geographical distribution.23

    Cloud Computing – the practice of using a network of remote servers hosted on the Internet to store, manage, and process data, rather than a local server or a personal computer.24 Cloud Computing can be a heavyweight and dense form of computing power.citation needed

    Fog computing – a term created by Cisco that refers to extending cloud computing to the edge of an enterprise's network. Also known as Edge Computing or fogging, fog computing facilitates the operation of compute, storage, and networking services between end devices and cloud computing data centers. While edge computing is typically referred to the location where services are instantiated, fog computing implies distribution of the communication, computation, and storage resources and services on or close to devices and systems in the control of end-users.2526 Fog computing is a medium weight and intermediate level of computing power27. Rather than a substitute, fog computing often serves as a complement to cloud computing.28

    Mist computing – a lightweight and rudimentarycitation needed form of computing power that resides directly within the network fabric at the extreme edge of the network fabric using microcomputers and microcontrollers to feed into Fog Computing nodes and potentially onward towards the Cloud Computing platforms.29

    National Institute of Standards and Technology in March, 2018 released a definition of the Fog computing adopting much of Cisco's commercial terminology as NIST Special Publication 500-325, Fog Computing Conceptual Model that defines Fog computing as an horizontal, physical or virtual resource paradigm that resides between smart end-devices and traditional cloud computing or data center. This paradigm supports vertically-isolated, latency-sensitive applications by providing ubiquitous, scalable, layered, federated, and distributed computing, storage, and network connectivity. Thus Fog Computing is most distinguished by distance from the Edge. Fog Computing is physically and functionally intermediate between Edge nodes and centralized Clouds. Much of the terminology is not defined including key architectural terms like "smart" and the distinction between Fog Computing from Edge Computing does not have generally agreed acceptance.

    Fog Computing, Wikipedia (visited Jan. 11, 2019

    Fog computing is a term for an alternative to cloud computing that puts some kinds of transactions and resources at the edge of a network, rather than establishing channels for cloud storage and utilization. Proponents of fog computing argue that it can reduce the need for bandwidth by not sending every bit of information over cloud channels, and instead aggregating it at certain access points, such as routers. This allows for a more strategic compilation of data that may not be needed in cloud storage right away, if at all. By using this kind of distributed strategy, project managers can lower costs and improve efficiencies.
    Fox Computing, Technopedia (visited Jan. 11, 2019)

    January 12, 2019

  • Femtocell, Wikipedia

    Femtocell, Technopedia

    January 12, 2019

  • Thanks to minimum railing heights of one meter (39 inches) and other structural barriers, CLIA Cruise Lines International Association) insists that man-overboard incidents (known in the industry as MOBs) are only “a result of an intentional or reckless act” and there are “no known cases of someone acting responsibly who has accidentally fallen over the railing of a cruise ship.”
    Rosie Spinks, People Fall off Cruise Ships with Alarming Regularity. Can Anything Be Done to Stop It?, Quartz (Dec. 17, 2018)

    December 18, 2018

  • A number of contacts said that they had been "ghosted," a situation in which a worker stops coming to work without notice and then is impossible to contact.
    Federal Reserve Board Beige Book - Dec. 5, 2018

    National data on economic “ghosting” is lacking. The term, which usually applies to dating, first surfaced in 2016 on Dictionary.com. But companies across the country say silent exits are on the rise.

    . . .

    Some employees are simply young and restless, said James Cooper, former manager of the Old Faithful Inn at Yellowstone Park, where he said people ghosted regularly.

    A few of his staffers were college students who lived in park dormitories for the summer.

    “My favorite,” he said, “was a kid who left a note on the floor in his dorm room that said ‘sorry bros, had to ghost.’ ”

    Danielle Paqquette, Workers Are Ghosting Their Employers Like Bad Dates, Wash. Post (Dec. 12, 2018)

    December 18, 2018

  • A number of contacts said that they had been "ghosted," a situation in which a worker stops coming to work without notice and then is impossible to contact.
    Federal Reserve Board Beige Book - Dec. 5, 2018

    National data on economic “ghosting” is lacking. The term, which usually applies to dating, first surfaced in 2016 on Dictionary.com. But companies across the country say silent exits are on the rise.

    . . .

    Some employees are simply young and restless, said James Cooper, former manager of the Old Faithful Inn at Yellowstone Park, where he said people ghosted regularly.

    A few of his staffers were college students who lived in park dormitories for the summer.

    “My favorite,” he said, “was a kid who left a note on the floor in his dorm room that said ‘sorry bros, had to ghost.’ ”

    Danielle Paqquette, Workers Are Ghosting Their Employers Like Bad Dates, Wash. Post (Dec. 12, 2018)

    December 17, 2018

  • A number of contacts said that they had been "ghosted," a situation in which a worker stops coming to work without notice and then is impossible to contact.
    Federal Reserve Board Beige Book - Dec. 5, 2018

    National data on economic “ghosting” is lacking. The term, which usually applies to dating, first surfaced in 2016 on Dictionary.com. But companies across the country say silent exits are on the rise.

    . . .

    Some employees are simply young and restless, said James Cooper, former manager of the Old Faithful Inn at Yellowstone Park, where he said people ghosted regularly.

    A few of his staffers were college students who lived in park dormitories for the summer.

    “My favorite,” he said, “was a kid who left a note on the floor in his dorm room that said ‘sorry bros, had to ghost.’ ”

    Danielle Paqquette, Workers Are Ghosting Their Employers Like Bad Dates, Wash. Post (Dec. 12, 2018)

    December 17, 2018

  • The underworld of true crime enthusiasts is a dark and creepy place. Foot scrapings, broken TVs, pubic hair and even penis tracings - it's all for sale, as long as it's connected to a crime or a notorious killer.

    . . .

    Although Mullins is just a collector, the industry built up around selling this so-called murderabilia is booming, aided in part by the ease of internet sales . . ..

    Keri Blakinger, A Look at the Weirdest and Creepiest Murderabilia, Houston Chronicle (July 10, 2017)

    December 14, 2018

  • cannabis + agriculture

    Ryan B. Stoa, Marijuana Appellations: The Case for Cannabicultural Designations of Origin, 11 Harv. L. & Pol'y Rev. 513-539 (2017)

    December 14, 2018

  • cannabis + agricultural

    Ryan B. Stoa, Marijuana Appellations: The Case for Cannabicultural Designations of Origin, 11 Harv. L. & Pol'y Rev. 513-539 (2017)

    December 14, 2018

  • Talking about race is hard. It often involves hurt feelings and misunderstandings. And the words and phrases we use can either push those conversations forward or bring them to a standstill. One such term: white tears.

    The phrase has been used to gently tease white people who get upset at things they think threaten their white privilege. It's been used to poke fun at white people who think that talking about race makes you a racist. Or that Barack Obama's presidency marked the end of America. Or that it's a crime against humanity when a formerly white character is portrayed, or rumored to be portrayed, by a person of color.

    Leah Donnella, When the 'White Tears' Just Keep Coming, Morning Edition (NPR) (Nov. 28, 2018)

    November 29, 2018

  • Scientific research that involves nonscientists contributing to research processes – also known as ‘citizen science’ – supports participants’ learning, engages the public in science, contributes to community scientific literacy, and can serve as a valuable tool to facilitate larger scale research, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. If one of the goals of a citizen science project is to advance learning, designers should plan for it by defining intended learning outcomes and using evidence-based strategies to reach those outcomes.
    New Report Says ‘Citizen Science’ Can Support Both Science Learning and Research Goals; Inequities in Education, Opportunities, and Resources Must be Addressed to Meet Participants’ Learning Demands, National Academies of Science, Engineering, Medicine press release (Nov. 1, 2018)

    November 15, 2018

  • Many of the current reform efforts contain the seeds of the next generation of racial and social control, a system of “e-carceration” that may prove more dangerous and more difficult to challenge than the one we hope to leave behind.
    Michelle Alexander, The Newest Jim Crow, N.Y. Times (Nov. 8, 2018)
    E-Carceration is the use of technology to deprive people of their liberty. Electronic monitors combined with house arrest represent the most obvious and likely the most punitive form of E-Carceration. Typically the state, usually via the criminal legal system, enforces E-Carceration. But corporations are also getting into the act by charging fees for repressive regimes of parole and probation which often include monitors. If we don’t resist, E-Carceration may be the successor to mass incarceration as we exchange prison cells for being confined in our own homes and communities.
    What Is E-Carceration?, Challenging E-Carceration: The Voice of the Monitored (2017)

    November 14, 2018

  • Many of the current reform efforts contain the seeds of the next generation of racial and social control, a system of “e-carceration” that may prove more dangerous and more difficult to challenge than the one we hope to leave behind.
    Michelle Alexander, The Newest Jim Crow, N.Y. Times (Nov. 8, 2018)
    E-Carceration is the use of technology to deprive people of their liberty. Electronic monitors combined with house arrest represent the most obvious and likely the most punitive form of E-Carceration. Typically the state, usually via the criminal legal system, enforces E-Carceration. But corporations are also getting into the act by charging fees for repressive regimes of parole and probation which often include monitors. If we don’t resist, E-Carceration may be the successor to mass incarceration as we exchange prison cells for being confined in our own homes and communities.
    What Is E-Carceration?, Challenging E-Carceration: The Voice of the Monitored (2017)

    November 14, 2018

  • Well, we shouldn't overlook one important factor, which is many more human beings are moving into the woods.

    There are now 100 million Americans who live in what is known as the wildland-urban interface, or the WUI, as researchers call it.

    The science behind California’s surging wildfires, PBS NewsHour, Niv. 13, 2018

    November 14, 2018

  • Well, we shouldn't overlook one important factor, which is many more human beings are moving into the woods.

    There are now 100 million Americans who live in what is known as the wildland-urban interface, or the WUI, as researchers call it.

    The science behind California’s surging wildfires, PBS NewsHour, Niv. 13, 2018

    November 14, 2018

  • This paper evaluates the U.S. Census Bureau’s most recent data collection efforts to classify business entities that engage in an extreme form of production fragmentation called “factoryless” goods production. “Factoryless” goods-producing entities outsource physical transformation activities while retaining ownership of the intellectual property and control of sales to customers. Responses to a special inquiry on the incidence of purchases of contract manufacturing services in combination with data on production inputs and outputs, intellectual property, and international trade is used to identify and document characteristics of “factoryless” firms in the U.S. economy.
    Fariha Kamal,

    A Portrait of U.S. Factoryless Goods Producers

    , NBER Working Paper No. 25193 (Oct. 2018)

    November 7, 2018

  • This paper evaluates the U.S. Census Bureau’s most recent data collection efforts to classify business entities that engage in an extreme form of production fragmentation called “factoryless” goods production. “Factoryless” goods-producing entities outsource physical transformation activities while retaining ownership of the intellectual property and control of sales to customers. Responses to a special inquiry on the incidence of purchases of contract manufacturing services in combination with data on production inputs and outputs, intellectual property, and international trade is used to identify and document characteristics of “factoryless” firms in the U.S. economy.
    Fariha Kamal, A Portrait of U.S. Factoryless Goods Producers, NBER Working Paper No. 25193 (Oct. 2018)

    November 7, 2018

  • Phosphogypsum stacks, also known as gypstacks, are mountains of waste left over from fertilizer production. Some of that waste is radon and uranium.

    The EPA says that it's too radioactive to be buried, so it's piled in these stacks. There are 25 of these things in Florida, and they're some of the highest points in the state.

    Laura Newberry, Battle over phosphate mining roils small Fla. town, PBS Newshour (Oct. 31, 2018)

    November 1, 2018

  • Phosphogypsum stacks, also known as gypstacks, are mountains of waste left over from fertilizer production. Some of that waste is radon and uranium.

    The EPA says that it's too radioactive to be buried, so it's piled in these stacks. There are 25 of these things in Florida, and they're some of the highest points in the state.

    Laura Newberry, Battle over phosphate mining roils small Fla. town, PBS Newshour (Oct. 31, 2018)

    November 1, 2018

  • Seiches and meteotsunamis. What's the difference?

    Seiches and meteotsunamis are often grouped together, but they are two different events. Winds and atmospheric pressure can contribute to the formation of both seiches and meteotsunamis; however, winds are typically more important to a seiche motion, while pressure often plays a substantial role in meteotsunami formation. Sometimes a seiche and a meteotsunami can even occur at the same time. Seiches are standing waves with longer periods of water-level oscillations (typically exceeding periods of three or more hours), whereas meteotsunamis are progressive waves limited to the tsunami frequency band of wave periods (two minutes to two hours). Seiches are usually limited to partially or fully enclosed basins, such as Lake Erie. Meteotsunamis can occur in such basins but are also prevalent on the open coast. A single meteotsunami can travel long distances and influence a very large range of the coastline.

    What Is a Seiche?, NOAA

    Meteotsunamis are large waves that scientists are just beginning to better understand. Unlike tsunamis triggered by seismic activity, meteotsunamis are driven by air-pressure disturbances often associated with fast-moving weather events, such as severe thunderstorms, squalls, and other storm fronts. The storm generates a wave that moves towards the shore, and is amplified by a shallow continental shelf and inlet, bay, or other coastal feature.

    Meteotsunamis have been observed to reach heights of 6 feet or more. They occur in many places around the world, including the Great Lakes, Gulf of Mexico, Atlantic Coast, and the Mediterranean and Adriatic Seas.

    What Is a Meteotsunami?, NOAA

    October 30, 2018

  • What Is a Seiche?, NOAA

    Seiches and meteotsunamis. What's the difference?

    Seiches and meteotsunamis are often grouped together, but they are two different events. Winds and atmospheric pressure can contribute to the formation of both seiches and meteotsunamis; however, winds are typically more important to a seiche motion, while pressure often plays a substantial role in meteotsunami formation. Sometimes a seiche and a meteotsunami can even occur at the same time. Seiches are standing waves with longer periods of water-level oscillations (typically exceeding periods of three or more hours), whereas meteotsunamis are progressive waves limited to the tsunami frequency band of wave periods (two minutes to two hours). Seiches are usually limited to partially or fully enclosed basins, such as Lake Erie. Meteotsunamis can occur in such basins but are also prevalent on the open coast. A single meteotsunami can travel long distances and influence a very large range of the coastline.

    Id.

    October 30, 2018

  • A "patent box" is a term for the application of a lower corporate tax rate to the income derived from the ownership of patents. This tax subsidy instrument has been introduced in a number of countries since 2000.
    Fabian Gaessler et al., Should There Be Lower Taxes on Patent Income?, NBER Working Paper No. 24843 (July 2018)

    October 24, 2018

  • Holacracy is a comprehensively designed internal management system that has received significant attention for its adoption at Zappos, Medium, and other tech companies. Holacracy replaces the internal firm hierarchy with a governance process that looks, in many ways, like a constitutional democracy. However, holacracy has a nomenclature all its own. CEOs hand over their power to a system of governance “circles”--teams that are assigned specific management responsibilities. These teams have the power to design and refine corporate policy within their jurisdictions. There is no overarching hierarchy to make ultimate decisions or overrule teams; instead, there is generally one ultimate governance circle--representing the entire organization--that has the final authority. The circles manage the assignment of roles to workers and oversee their performance. Ultimately, holacracy is a combination of democratic republic, Quaker meetinghouse, and tech-speak: the system is structured to encourage participation by all employees in governance through a carefully designed set of roles and opportunities.
    Matthew T. Bodie, Holacracy and the Law, 42 Del. J. Corp. L. 621-22 (2018) (footnotes omitted)

    October 22, 2018

  • Holacracy is a comprehensively designed internal management system that has received significant attention for its adoption at Zappos, Medium, and other tech companies. Holacracy replaces the internal firm hierarchy with a governance process that looks, in many ways, like a constitutional democracy. However, holacracy has a nomenclature all its own. CEOs hand over their power to a system of governance “circles”--teams that are assigned specific management responsibilities. These teams have the power to design and refine corporate policy within their jurisdictions. There is no overarching hierarchy to make ultimate decisions or overrule teams; instead, there is generally one ultimate governance circle--representing the entire organization--that has the final authority. The circles manage the assignment of roles to workers and oversee their performance. Ultimately, holacracy is a combination of democratic republic, Quaker meetinghouse, and tech-speak: the system is structured to encourage participation by all employees in governance through a carefully designed set of roles and opportunities.
    Matthew T. Bodie, Holacracy and the Law, 42 Del. J. Corp. L. 621-22 (2018) (footnotes omitted)

    October 22, 2018

  • Holacracy is a comprehensively designed internal management system that has received significant attention for its adoption at Zappos, Medium, and other tech companies. Holacracy replaces the internal firm hierarchy with a governance process that looks, in many ways, like a constitutional democracy. However, holacracy has a nomenclature all its own. CEOs hand over their power to a system of governance “circles”--teams that are assigned specific management responsibilities. These teams have the power to design and refine corporate policy within their jurisdictions. There is no overarching hierarchy to make ultimate decisions or overrule teams; instead, there is generally one ultimate governance circle--representing the entire organization--that has the final authority. The circles manage the assignment of roles to workers and oversee their performance. Ultimately, holacracy is a combination of democratic republic, Quaker meetinghouse, and tech-speak: the system is structured to encourage participation by all employees in governance through a carefully designed set of roles and opportunities.
    Matthew T. Bodie, Holacracy and the Law, 42 Del. J. Corp. L. 621-22 (2018) (footnotes omitted)

    October 22, 2018

  • The increasing demand for rigor in empirical economics has led to the growing use of auxiliary tests (balance, specification, over-identification, placebo, etc.) supporting the credibility of a paper's main results. We dub these "sniff tests" because standards for passing are subjective and rejection is bad news for the author. Sniff tests offer a new window into publication bias since authors prefer them to be insignificant, the reverse of standard statistical tests.
    Christopher Snyder & Ran Zhuo, Values and Implications for Publication Bias (Sept. 2018) (abstract)

    October 5, 2018

  • No-poach provisions appear in lengthy franchise agreements that owners of fast-food franchises sign with corporate headquarters. Consequently, employees are generally unaware the provisions even exist. In effect, the provisions prohibit employees from moving among restaurants of the same corporate chain ― for example, prohibiting one Little Caesars employee from accepting employment from another Little Caesars franchise location for higher pay.

    Because employees cannot move to another location within their corporate brand, their current location has less incentive to give them raises.

    Press Release, AG Ferguson Secures End ot No-Poach Provisions at Eight More Restaurant Chains Nationwide (Sept. 13, 2018)

    October 5, 2018

  • No-poach provisions appear in lengthy franchise agreements that owners of fast-food franchises sign with corporate headquarters. Consequently, employees are generally unaware the provisions even exist. In effect, the provisions prohibit employees from moving among restaurants of the same corporate chain ― for example, prohibiting one Little Caesars employee from accepting employment from another Little Caesars franchise location for higher pay.

    Because employees cannot move to another location within their corporate brand, their current location has less incentive to give them raises.

    Press Release, AG Ferguson Secures End ot No-Poach Provisions at Eight More Restaurant Chains Nationwide (Sept. 13, 2018)

    October 5, 2018

  • The second week, Winer let him cut meat from bones and cut up scrap meat and grind it into hamburger, which was called chopmeat in the neighborhood.
    Betty Smith, Maggie-Now (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1958), pp. 382-83. (The setting is Brooklyn shortly after World War I.)

    September 11, 2018

  • Denny was making soup greens. He walked along the bins, taking a wrinkled carrot, an outside stalk leaf of celery, pinched with wilt at the top, a tomato with a soft spot and a sprig of parsley. He put these in a twist of paper called a toot. When he had enough toots filled, he wrote a sign on a paper bag: Sale on Soup Greens. Only 5¢.
    Betty Smith, Maggie-Now (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1958), p. 381 (The setting is Brooklyn, a few years after World War I.)

    September 11, 2018

  • Before the war, women' had worked as factory hands, store clerks, waitresses, telephone operators, typists, cashiers, housemaids and so forth . . .

    Now, most all jobs were open to them. They worked as trolley-car conductors, operated elevators, drew beer, worked milk delivery routes, replaced men in the post offices, wor cute uniforms and worked down at the Brooklyn Navy Yard and were called yeomanettes. Men stopped giving them their seats in the subways.

    Betty Smith, Maggie-Now (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1958), p. 256 ("The war" is World War I.)

    September 11, 2018

  • It was always a warm, sunny day with a sweet-smelling wind around the next corner. When Maggie-Now went to the baker's for the morning buns, there was usually a customer there who confided to the bakery woman: "I'm going to the cemetery in my shape today." That meant it was warm enough to go without a coat.

    Maggie-Now and her mother went to the cemetery in their shapes.

    Betty Smith, Maggie-Now (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1958), p. 107 (The setting is Brooklyn, before World War I.)

    September 11, 2018

  • There isn't even an agreed upon term for multi-book readers. There are bibliophiles — lovers of books. There are bibliotaphs — hoarders of books, with the intent of keeping the books out of the hands of others. There's even a word for people who like to read in bed — librocubicularist. But no succinct way of summing up the act of reading more than one book at at time.

    But that doesn't mean the internet hasn't tried to come up with a term on their own. I've seen "parallel readers" (recently suggested in a Quora forum). "Polynarritivus," from a Bookstr article last year. And "poly-reader," from a 2010 NPR piece.

    Maddy Foley, How to Read More Than One Book at a Time, According to Reddit Users Who Do It, Bustle (Sept. 6, 2018)

    September 11, 2018

  • There isn't even an agreed upon term for multi-book readers. There are bibliophiles — lovers of books. There are bibliotaphs — hoarders of books, with the intent of keeping the books out of the hands of others. There's even a word for people who like to read in bed — librocubicularist. But no succinct way of summing up the act of reading more than one book at at time.

    But that doesn't mean the internet hasn't tried to come up with a term on their own. I've seen "parallel readers" (recently suggested in a Quora forum). "Polynarritivus," from a Bookstr article last year. And "poly-reader," from a 2010 NPR piece.

    Maddy Foley, How to Read More Than One Book at a Time, According to Reddit Users Who Do It, Bustle (Sept. 6, 2018)

    September 11, 2018

  • There isn't even an agreed upon term for multi-book readers. There are bibliophiles — lovers of books. There are bibliotaphs — hoarders of books, with the intent of keeping the books out of the hands of others. There's even a word for people who like to read in bed — librocubicularist. But no succinct way of summing up the act of reading more than one book at at time.

    But that doesn't mean the internet hasn't tried to come up with a term on their own. I've seen "parallel readers" (recently suggested in a Quora forum). "Polynarritivus," from a Bookstr article last year. And "poly-reader," from a 2010 NPR piece.

    Maddy Foley, How to Read More Than One Book at a Time, According to Reddit Users Who Do It, Bustle (Sept. 6, 2018)

    September 11, 2018

  • There isn't even an agreed upon term for multi-book readers. There are bibliophiles — lovers of books. There are bibliotaphs — hoarders of books, with the intent of keeping the books out of the hands of others. There's even a word for people who like to read in bed — librocubicularist. But no succinct way of summing up the act of reading more than one book at at time.

    But that doesn't mean the internet hasn't tried to come up with a term on their own. I've seen "parallel readers" (recently suggested in a Quora forum). "Polynarritivus," from a Bookstr article last year. And "poly-reader," from a 2010 NPR piece.

    Maddy Foley, How to Read More Than One Book at a Time, According to Reddit Users Who Do It, Bustle (Sept. 6, 2018)

    September 11, 2018

  • There isn't even an agreed upon term for multi-book readers. There are bibliophiles — lovers of books. There are bibliotaphs — hoarders of books, with the intent of keeping the books out of the hands of others. There's even a word for people who like to read in bed — librocubicularist. But no succinct way of summing up the act of reading more than one book at at time.

    But that doesn't mean the internet hasn't tried to come up with a term on their own. I've seen "parallel readers" (recently suggested in a Quora forum). "Polynarritivus," from a Bookstr article last year. And "poly-reader," from a 2010 NPR piece.

    Maddy Foley, How to Read More Than One Book at a Time, According to Reddit Users Who Do It, Bustle (Sept. 6, 2018)

    September 11, 2018

  • There isn't even an agreed upon term for multi-book readers. There are bibliophiles — lovers of books. There are bibliotaphs — hoarders of books, with the intent of keeping the books out of the hands of others. There's even a word for people who like to read in bed — librocubicularist. But no succinct way of summing up the act of reading more than one book at at time.

    But that doesn't mean the internet hasn't tried to come up with a term on their own. I've seen "parallel readers" (recently suggested in a Quora forum). "Polynarritivus," from a Bookstr article last year. And "poly-reader," from a 2010 NPR piece.

    Maddy Foley, How to Read More Than One Book at a Time, According to Reddit Users Who Do It, Bustle (Sept. 6, 2018)

    September 11, 2018

  • During this era, the word "jay" meant something like "rube" or "hick" — a person from the sticks, who didn't know how to behave in a city. So pro-auto groups promoted use of the word "jay walker" as someone who didn't know how to walk in a city, threatening public safety.

    At first, the term was seen as offensive, even shocking. Pedestrians fired back, calling dangerous driving "jay driving."

    Joseph Stromberg, The Forgotten History of How Automakers Invented the Crime of “Jaywalking Vox (Nov. 4, 2015)

    See Peter Jensen Brown, Jaywalkers and Jayhawkers - a Pedestrian History and Etymology of "Jaywalking", Early Sports and Pop Culture History Blog (Nov. 24, 2014)

    August 27, 2018

  • During this era, the word "jay" meant something like "rube" or "hick" — a person from the sticks, who didn't know how to behave in a city. So pro-auto groups promoted use of the word "jay walker" as someone who didn't know how to walk in a city, threatening public safety.

    At first, the term was seen as offensive, even shocking. Pedestrians fired back, calling dangerous driving "jay driving."

    Joseph Stromberg, The Forgotten History of How Automakers Invented the Crime of “Jaywalking Vox (Nov. 4, 2015)

    See Peter Jensen Brown, Jaywalkers and Jayhawkers - a Pedestrian History and Etymology of "Jaywalking", Early Sports and Pop Culture History Blog (Nov. 24, 2014)

    August 27, 2018

  • During this era, the word "jay" meant something like "rube" or "hick" — a person from the sticks, who didn't know how to behave in a city. So pro-auto groups promoted use of the word "jay walker" as someone who didn't know how to walk in a city, threatening public safety.

    At first, the term was seen as offensive, even shocking. Pedestrians fired back, calling dangerous driving "jay driving."

    Joseph Stromberg, The Forgotten History of How Automakers Invented the Crime of “Jaywalking Vox (Nov. 4, 2015)

    See Peter Jensen Brown, Jaywalkers and Jayhawkers - a Pedestrian History and Etymology of "Jaywalking", Early Sports and Pop Culture History Blog (Nov. 24, 2014)

    August 27, 2018

  • During this era, the word "jay" meant something like "rube" or "hick" — a person from the sticks, who didn't know how to behave in a city. So pro-auto groups promoted use of the word "jay walker" as someone who didn't know how to walk in a city, threatening public safety.

    At first, the term was seen as offensive, even shocking. Pedestrians fired back, calling dangerous driving "jay driving."

    Joseph Stromberg, The Forgotten History of How Automakers Invented the Crime of “Jaywalking Vox (Nov. 4, 2015)

    See Peter Jensen Brown, Jaywalkers and Jayhawkers - a Pedestrian History and Etymology of "Jaywalking", Early Sports and Pop Culture History Blog (Nov. 24, 2014)

    August 27, 2018

  • Of the forty-one times that the phrase patient-centered appears in the Affordable Care Act, most occur in the law’s establishment of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute. The institute will be a new, independent organization for comparative effectiveness research. Donald Berwick, now Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, has defined patient-centered as

    “the experience (to the extent the informed, individual patient desires it) of transparency, individualization, recognition, respect, dignity, and choice in all matters, without exception, related to one’s person, circumstances, and relationships in health care.”

    Tony Coelho, A Patient Advocate’s Perspective on Patient-Centered Comparative Effectiveness Research, Health Affairs, vol. 29, p. 1886 (2010).

    Cites DM Berwick, What "Patient-Centered" Should Mean: Confessions of an Extremist, Health Affairs, vol. 28, no. 4, w560 (2009)

    August 24, 2018

  • The same basic technique can tell us a lot about how banks—and other bank-like creatures or SIFIs,2 to use the industry lingo—should fail.

    note 2: Systemically Important Financial Institutions.

    Stephen J. Lubben, A Functional Analysis of SIFI Insolvency, 96 Tex. L. Rev. 1377 (2018)

    August 17, 2018

  • The same basic technique can tell us a lot about how banks—and other bank-like creatures or SIFIs,2 to use the industry lingo—should fail.

    note 2: Systemically Important Financial Institutions.

    Stephen J. Lubben, A Functional Analysis of SIFI Insolvency, 96 Tex. L. Rev. 1377 (2018)

    August 17, 2018

  • The same basic technique can tell us a lot about how banks—and other bank-like creatures or SIFIs,2 to use the industry lingo—should fail.

    note 2: Systemically Important Financial Institutions.

    Stephen J. Lubben, A Functional Analysis of SIFI Insolvency, 96 Tex. L. Rev. 1377 (2018)

    August 17, 2018

  • We, Moya Bailey and Trudy aka @thetrudz, had significant roles in the creation and proliferation of the term misogynoir. Misogynoir describes the anti-Black racist misogyny that Black women experience. Despite coining the term in 2008 and writing about the term online since 2010, we experience to varying degrees, our contributions being erased, or writing not cited, or our words plagiarized by people who find the word compelling. . . . This is not to say that every time the word is used our names need to be mentioned, but it does matter that our intellectual interventions are understood in proper context.
    Moya Bailey, On Misogynoir: Citation, Erasure, and Plagiarism, Moya Bailey (blog) (March 13, 2018) (links to article in Feminist Media Studies, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 762-68 (pub. online March 13, 2018)).

    August 16, 2018

  • Our social feeds have been on fire with a mind-bending, gasp-worthy video posted by percuss.io earlier this week — below — made by the accomplished Indian percussionist B.C. Manjunath. He's a master of konnakol -- the Carnatic, or South Indian, art of speaking percussive syllables in rapid-fire, intricate patterns to convey a larger thalam, or rhythmic cycle.
    Anastasia Tsioulcas, Let This Percussionist Blow Your Mind With The Fibonacci Sequence, NPR (Aug. 10, 2018)

    August 15, 2018

  • Our social feeds have been on fire with a mind-bending, gasp-worthy video posted by percuss.io earlier this week — below — made by the accomplished Indian percussionist B.C. Manjunath. He's a master of konnakol -- the Carnatic, or South Indian, art of speaking percussive syllables in rapid-fire, intricate patterns to convey a larger thalam, or rhythmic cycle.
    Anastasia Tsioulcas, Let This Percussionist Blow Your Mind With The Fibonacci Sequence, NPR (Aug. 10, 2018)

    August 15, 2018

  • Our social feeds have been on fire with a mind-bending, gasp-worthy video posted by percuss.io earlier this week — below — made by the accomplished Indian percussionist B.C. Manjunath. He's a master of konnakol -- the Carnatic, or South Indian, art of speaking percussive syllables in rapid-fire, intricate patterns to convey a larger thalam, or rhythmic cycle.
    Anastasia Tsioulcas, Let This Percussionist Blow Your Mind With The Fibonacci Sequence, NPR (Aug. 10, 2018)

    August 15, 2018

  • "Just please don't Frankenbite me," Liz said, and Anne looked at her blankly. "Isn't that what it's called?" Liz said. "When you take one word I said here and one word there and put them together into a sentence that you use as a voiceover?"

    "I've never heard that term." Anne was still smiling. . . .

    Bullshit, Liz thought. Bullshit you've never heard it.

    Curtis Sittenfeld, Eligible (New York: Random House, 2016), p. 437

    August 9, 2018

  • In the reception room, Darcy had gestured at the doorway, which was framed by columns and a peaked roof, and said to Liz, "All that trim is known as an aedicule—that's a good word for a writer, huh?"
    Curtis Sittenfeld, Eligible (New York: Random House, 2016), p. 323)

    August 9, 2018

  • Tempora mutantur is a Latin adage meaning "times change." It dates to 16th century Germany. Source: Wikipedia

    August 9, 2018

  • in order for a disclosure regulation to serve as a device that aids issuers in making a credible commitment to complete and continuous disclosure into the future, it must have a characteristic "lobster trap" structure: easy to enter voluntarily; hard to exit.
    Edward Rock, Securities Regulation as Lobster Trap: A Credible Commitment Theory of Mandatory Disclosure, 23 Cardozo L. Rev. 675, 692 (2002)

    August 1, 2018

  • See non rivalrously.

    July 20, 2018

  • See non rivalrously.

    July 20, 2018

  • while copyright, patent, trademark and unfair competition are conventionally conjoined—perhaps to give the field more heft—is the combination coherent? After all, few lawyers' practices encompass all of these.

    Nonetheless, these subjects share certain characteristics. Because all these legal regimes cover intangibles that can be enjoyed "non rivalrously"—that is, without depriving other consumers of equal benefit—they require justification.

    Jane C. Ginsburg & Rochelle Cooper Dreyfuss, "Introduction and Overview," in Intellectual Property Stories (New York: Foundation Press, 2006), p. 1

    July 20, 2018

  • Perhaps you’ve heard the term “helicopter parenting” as a way to describe the way today’s 20-somethings (Gen Y) were hovered over in childhood by their parents. As a life coach to 20-somethings and consultant to corporations with Gen Y employees, I’ve seen the effects of an even more intrusive child-rearing style that I have coined as “cockpit parenting.” Cockpit parents did more than hover. They sat right in the pilot’s seat of their child’s life, charting the course and navigating all of the twists and turns. And they often remain there well into their child’s adulthood. . . .

    . . .

    Cockpit parents tend to pull all kinds of maneuvers like this. Things like writing their child’s résumé, calling in favors to their friends to get their child an internship or job, or even making-up corporations where their child has “worked.” And let’s not forget my personal favorite: listing themselves as references. These parents think they are helping, but they are not. There is a line between supporting your children and enabling them. And if cockpit parents continue to sit in the pilot’s seat of their child’s life, then the adult child continues to remain dependent on mom and dad for advice, money and answers to questions they should be answering for themselves.

    Christine Hassler, Cockpit Parents: How They're Flying 20-Somethings into the Ground, Huffpost Blog (March 18, 2011)

    June 3, 2018

  • Perhaps you’ve heard the term “helicopter parenting” as a way to describe the way today’s 20-somethings (Gen Y) were hovered over in childhood by their parents. As a life coach to 20-somethings and consultant to corporations with Gen Y employees, I’ve seen the effects of an even more intrusive child-rearing style that I have coined as “cockpit parenting.” Cockpit parents did more than hover. They sat right in the pilot’s seat of their child’s life, charting the course and navigating all of the twists and turns. And they often remain there well into their child’s adulthood. . . .

    . . .

    Cockpit parents tend to pull all kinds of maneuvers like this. Things like writing their child’s résumé, calling in favors to their friends to get their child an internship or job, or even making-up corporations where their child has “worked.” And let’s not forget my personal favorite: listing themselves as references. These parents think they are helping, but they are not. There is a line between supporting your children and enabling them. And if cockpit parents continue to sit in the pilot’s seat of their child’s life, then the adult child continues to remain dependent on mom and dad for advice, money and answers to questions they should be answering for themselves.

    Christine Hassler, Cockpit Parents: How They're Flying 20-Somethings into the Ground, Huffpost Blog (March 18, 2011)

    June 3, 2018

  • a "sex robot" is any artificial entity that is used for sexual purposes (i.e., for sexual stimulation and release) that meets the following three conditions:

    Humanoid form, i.e., it is intended to represent (and is taken to represent) a human or human-like being in its appearance.

    Human-like movement/behavior, i.e., it is intended to represent (and is taken to represent) a human or humanlike being in its behaviors and movements.

    Some degree of artificial intelligence, i.e., it is capable of interpreting and responding to information in its environment. This may be minimal (e.g., simple preprogrammed behavioral responses) or more sophisticated (e.g., human-equivalent intelligence).

    John Danaher, "Should We Be Thinking About Robot Sex?", in John Danaher & Neil McArthur, eds., Robot Sex: Social and Ethical Implications (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2017), pp. 4-5

    Danaher and other contributors to the book seem to use sex robot interchangeably with sexbot.

    June 3, 2018

  • a "sex robot" is any artificial entity that is used for sexual purposes (i.e., for sexual stimulation and release) that meets the following three conditions:

    Humanoid form, i.e., it is intended to represent (and is taken to represent) a human or human-like being in its appearance.

    Human-like movement/behavior, i.e., it is intended to represent (and is taken to represent) a human or humanlike being in its behaviors and movements.

    Some degree of artificial intelligence, i.e., it is capable of interpreting and responding to information in its environment. This may be minimal (e.g., simple preprogrammed behavioral responses) or more sophisticated (e.g., human-equivalent intelligence).

    John Danaher, "Should We Be Thinking About Robot Sex?", in John Danaher & Neil McArthur, eds., Robot Sex: Social and Ethical Implications (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2017), pp. 4-5

    Danaher and other contributors to the book seem to use sex robot interchangeably with sexbot.

    June 3, 2018

  • there are thos who see the purpose of sex as necessarily procreative. According to procreationism (as it is sometimes called), any sexual activity that is inherently non-procreative, as sex with a robot must be, violates this natural purpose of sex, and is therefore immoral. . . . Such people do not generally insist that each individual sex act must be intended to produce children. Rather, they argue that acceptable sex acts must belong to the class of acts that could potentially be reproductive.
    Neil McArthur, "The Case for Sexbots" in John Danaher & Neil McArthur, eds., Robot Sex: Social and Ethical Implications (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2017), p. 35

    June 3, 2018

  • With the emergence of virtual reality technologies . . . and haptic technologies (i.e., technologies that replicate and transmit touchlike sensations via a network), it is possible to have immersive sexual experiences in virtual reality.
    John Danaher, "Should We Be Thinking About Robot Sex?", in John Danaher & Neil McArthur, eds., Robot Sex: Social and Ethical Implications (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2017), p. 5

    June 3, 2018

  • With the emergence of virtual reality technologies . . . and haptic technologies (i.e., technologies that replicate and transmit touchlike sensations via a network), it is possible to have immersive sexual experiences in virtual reality.
    John Danaher, "Should We Be Thinking About Robot Sex?", in John Danaher & Neil McArthur, eds., Robot Sex: Social and Ethical Implications (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2017), p. 5

    June 3, 2018

  • Since the early part of the twentieth century there have been further developments in the technology of sex, from artificial vaginas to lifelike silicone dolls to teledildonics.
    John Danaher, "Should We Be Thinking About Robot Sex?", in John Danaher & Neil McArthur, eds., Robot Sex: Social and Ethical Implications (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2017), pp. 3-4

    June 3, 2018

  • Theranostics takes advantage of novel nanotechnology platforms by incorporating therapy, imaging diagnostics, and cell targeting into one system with multifunctional capabilities. Theranostic nanomedicine exploits the multifunctional capabilities of nanoscale devices and the molecular knowledge of the human body to diagnose, treat, and possibly, prevent diseases.
    Fabrice Jotterand & Archie A. Alexander, Managing the “Known Unknowns”: Theranostic Cancer Nanomedicine and Informed Consent, in Sarah J. Hurst, ed., Biomedical Nanotechnology: Methods and Protocols (New York: Humana Press, 2011), p. 414

    May 24, 2018

  • Theranostics takes advantage of novel nanotechnology platforms by incorporating therapy, imaging diagnostics, and cell targeting into one system with multifunctional capabilities. Theranostic nanomedicine exploits the multifunctional capabilities of nanoscale devices and the molecular knowledge of the human body to diagnose, treat, and possibly, prevent diseases.
    Fabrice Jotterand & Archie A. Alexander, Managing the “Known Unknowns”: Theranostic Cancer Nanomedicine and Informed Consent, in Sarah J. Hurst, ed., Biomedical Nanotechnology: Methods and Protocols (New York: Humana Press, 2011), p. 414

    May 24, 2018

  • Theranostics takes advantage of novel nanotechnology platforms by incorporating therapy, imaging diagnostics, and cell targeting into one system with multifunctional capabilities. Theranostic nanomedicine exploits the multifunctional capabilities of nanoscale devices and the molecular knowledge of the human body to diagnose, treat, and possibly, prevent diseases.
    Fabrice Jotterand & Archie A. Alexander, Managing the “Known Unknowns”: Theranostic Cancer Nanomedicine and Informed Consent, in Sarah J. Hurst, ed., Biomedical Nanotechnology: Methods and Protocols (New York: Humana Press, 2011), p. 414

    May 24, 2018

  • Lichenification is when your skin becomes thick and leathery as a result of constant scratching. When you continually scratch an area of skin for a prolonged period of time, your skin cells begin to grow. This leads to a thickening of the skin and an exaggeration of normal skin markings — such as cracks, wrinkles, or scales — which gives your skin a leathery or bark-like appearance.
    Healthline

    May 18, 2018

  • “Hole” seems like a terrible name for something that is actually very dense and solid. “Black mass” would be a better name if it didn’t sound like a satanic ritual.
    Jorge Cham & Daniel Whiteson, We Have No Idea: A Guide to the Unknown Universe (Riverhead Books: New York, 2017), p. 197 n. 82

    May 7, 2018

  • Does a nearly instantaneous twenty-five order of magnitude faster-than-light expansion of the fabric of space-time sound totally ridiculous and made up? If so, you’re probably not a crazy physicist.

    In fact, this is the solution physicists have come up with to explain why the universe is bigger than it should be and why it is at an even temperature. They call is (drumroll) “inflation.” Okay, not the more awe inspiring of names. But the crazy thing is that it’s probably true.

    Jorge Cham & Daniel Whiteson, We Have No Idea: A Guide to the Unknown Universe (Riverhead Books: New York, 2017), p. 240

    May 7, 2018

  • Google the word “tardigrade” and prepare to be shocked.
    Jorge Cham & Daniel Whiteson, We Have No Idea: A Guide to the Unknown Universe (Riverhead Books: New York, 2017), p. 321 n. 126

    May 7, 2018

  • See Thomas Boothby, Meet the Tardigrade, the Toughest Animal on Earth, TED-Ed.

    May 7, 2018

  • The name “cosmic ray“ might be a little unnecessarily intriguing: it simply means a particle from space. Stars and other objects are constantly shooting out photons, protons, neutrinos, and even some heavy ions.

    Jorge Cham & Daniel Whiteson, We Have No Idea: A Guide to the Unknown Universe (Riverhead Books: New York, 2017), p. 186

    May 6, 2018

  • By “locality,” we mean the idea that the number of things that can affect you is limited by the number of things that are close to you.
    Jorge Cham & Daniel Whiteson, We Have No Idea: A Guide to the Unknown Universe (Riverhead Books: New York, 2017), p. 175

    May 6, 2018

  • In 1932, Benjamin Malzberg, a New York epidemiologist, published a study showing that people with mental illness died, on average, 14 to 18 years earlier than otherwise similar people in the general population.1 This mortality gap persists today and may even have widened: a 2006 U.S. study suggested that it ranged from 13 to 30 years.2 Indeed, the gap persists worldwide,3 mostly owing to medical conditions, such as cancer and cardiovascular disease, rather than “unnatural” causes, such as accidents and suicide.
    Lisa Rosenbaum, M.D., Closing the Mortality Gap, New Eng. J. Med., Oct. 20, 2016

    May 2, 2018

  • "It turns out that if you dislike the music, it is more damaging to hearing.

    "These data have been around since the early '70s. We're not too sure of all the reasons, but we do know that when you're disliking something, you have a higher stress level. And believe it or not, the biochemistry of the ear changes, and it makes you slightly more susceptible to hearing loss. It's called glutamate ototoxicity."audiologist Marshall Chasin, interviewed by Peter O'Dowd, For Musicians, Hearing Loss Is 'More Common Than One Would Think,' Audiologist Says Here & Now (Apr. 30, 2018)

    April 30, 2018

  • The citation network tells us how ideas are related; visual representations tell us how ideas are communicated. Figures from related groups, authors, and fields share a ‘DNA’ that can reveal how information is conveyed.

    We adopt the term viziometrics to describe this line of research to convey the shared goals with bibliometrics and scientometrics. As with bibliometrics, viziometrics uses citations to measure impact, but focuses on relating impact to the patterns of figure use. We analyze theses patterns within the papers (specifically, the distribution of various figure types) in order to understand how they may be used to more effectively communicate ideas. We have two overarching goals . . . First, we seek to build new tools and services based on the visual information in the literature to help researchers find results more efficiently. . . . Second, can the patterns of figure use inform new best practices for scientific communication, especially outside of the authors’ own discipline?

    Po-Shen Lee, Jevin D. West & Bill Howe, Viziometrics: Analyzing Visual Information in the Scientific Literature, IEEE Transactions in Big Data, Vol. 4, No. 1 (March 1, 2018)

    April 24, 2018

  • The citation network tells us how ideas are related; visual representations tell us how ideas are communicated. Figures from related groups, authors, and fields share a ‘DNA’ that can reveal how information is conveyed.

    We adopt the term viziometrics to describe this line of research to convey the shared goals with bibliometrics and scientometrics. As with bibliometrics, viziometrics uses citations to measure impact, but focuses on relating impact to the patterns of figure use. We analyze theses patterns within the papers (specifically, the distribution of various figure types) in order to understand how they may be used to more effectively communicate ideas. We have two overarching goals . . . First, we seek to build new tools and services based on the visual information in the literature to help researchers find results more efficiently. . . . Second, can the patterns of figure use inform new best practices for scientific communication, especially outside of the authors’ own discipline?

    Po-Shen Lee, Jevin D. West & Bill Howe, Viziometrics: Analyzing Visual Information in the Scientific Literature, IEEE Transactions in Big Data, Vol. 4, No. 1 (March 1, 2018)

    April 24, 2018

  • The citation network tells us how ideas are related; visual representations tell us how ideas are communicated. Figures from related groups, authors, and fields share a ‘DNA’ that can reveal how information is conveyed.

    We adopt the term viziometrics to describe this line of research to convey the shared goals with bibliometrics and scientometrics. As with bibliometrics, viziometrics uses citations to measure impact, but focuses on relating impact to the patterns of figure use. We analyze theses patterns within the papers (specifically, the distribution of various figure types) in order to understand how they may be used to more effectively communicate ideas. We have two overarching goals . . . First, we seek to build new tools and services based on the visual information in the literature to help researchers find results more efficiently. . . . Second, can the patterns of figure use inform new best practices for scientific communication, especially outside of the authors’ own discipline?

    Po-Shen Lee, Jevin D. West & Bill Howe, Viziometrics: Analyzing Visual Information in the Scientific Literature, IEEE Transactions in Big Data, Vol. 4, No. 1 (March 1, 2018)

    April 24, 2018

  • While at the University of Washington, in Seattle, where he taught for 33 years, Professor North helped found a branch of inquiry called cliometrics, named for the muse of history, Clio, after he and others had concluded that traditional market-oriented economics faltered in measuring some aspects of economic performance quantitatively.
    Robert D. Hershey Jr., Douglass C. North, Maverick Economist and Nobel Laureate, Dies at 95, N.Y. Times (Nov. 24, 2015)

    April 23, 2018

  • A deplorable practice has emerged in the world of adoption. Adoptive families are now using the Internet to give their unwanted adopted children over to complete strangers, some of whom are traffickers, pedophiles, child pornographers, or worse. This practice is known as private re-homing. Through the use of online message boards and a simple notarized power of attorney document, adoptive parents are circumventing the adoption system-including its home study and background check requirements for prospective parents-and placing children in great danger.
    S. Megan Testerman, Note, A World Wide Web of Unwanted Children: The Practice, the Problem, and the Solution to Private Re-Homing, 67 Fla. L. Rev. 2103 (2015) (abstract)

    April 19, 2018

  • A deplorable practice has emerged in the world of adoption. Adoptive families are now using the Internet to give their unwanted adopted children over to complete strangers, some of whom are traffickers, pedophiles, child pornographers, or worse. This practice is known as private re-homing. Through the use of online message boards and a simple notarized power of attorney document, adoptive parents are circumventing the adoption system-including its home study and background check requirements for prospective parents-and placing children in great danger.
    S. Megan Testerman, Note, A World Wide Web of Unwanted Children: The Practice, the Problem, and the Solution to Private Re-Homing, 67 Fla. L. Rev. 2103 (2015) (abstract)

    April 19, 2018

  • A deplorable practice has emerged in the world of adoption. Adoptive families are now using the Internet to give their unwanted adopted children over to complete strangers, some of whom are traffickers, pedophiles, child pornographers, or worse. This practice is known as private re-homing. Through the use of online message boards and a simple notarized power of attorney document, adoptive parents are circumventing the adoption system-including its home study and background check requirements for prospective parents-and placing children in great danger.
    S. Megan Testerman, Note, A World Wide Web of Unwanted Children: The Practice, the Problem, and the Solution to Private Re-Homing, 67 Fla. L. Rev. 2103 (2015) (abstract)

    April 19, 2018

  • Distributions with long tails are called leptokurtic; distributions with short tails are called platykurtic. Normal distributions have zero kurtosis.

    David M. Lane et al., Introduction to Statistics (I don't see the date), p. 669

    April 7, 2018

  • Distributions with long tails are called leptokurtic; distributions with short tails are called platykurtic. Normal distributions have zero kurtosis.

    David M. Lane et al., Introduction to Statistics (I don't see the date), p. 669

    April 7, 2018

  • Distributions with long tails are called leptokurtic; distributions with short tails are called platykurtic. Normal distributions have zero kurtosis.

    David M. Lane et al., Introduction to Statistics (I don't see the date), p. 669

    April 7, 2018

  • Distributions with long tails are called leptokurtic; distributions with short tails are called platykurtic. Normal distributions have zero kurtosis.

    David M. Lane et al., Introduction to Statistics (I don't see the date), p. 669

    April 7, 2018

  • And while there were plenty of henotheist pagans (that is, people who worshiped one god while not denying the validity of others), Christianity went far beyond henotheism’s hesitant claim upon ultimate truth. It was an exclusivist faith that foreclosed — was designed to foreclose — devotion to all other deities.
    Tom Bissell, Why Did Christianity Prevail?, N.Y. Times Book Review, Feb. 18, 2018 (print title: When Pagans Became Christians)

    February 18, 2018

  • And while there were plenty of henotheist pagans (that is, people who worshiped one god while not denying the validity of others), Christianity went far beyond henotheism’s hesitant claim upon ultimate truth. It was an exclusivist faith that foreclosed — was designed to foreclose — devotion to all other deities.
    Tom Bissell, Why Did Christianity Prevail?, N.Y. Times Book Review, Feb. 18, 2018 (print title: When Pagans Became Christians)

    February 18, 2018

  • Afrofuturism is a cultural aesthetic, philosophy of science, and philosophy of history that combines elements of science fiction, historical fiction, fantasy, Afrocentrism, and magic realism with non-Western cosmologies in order to critique not only the present-day dilemmas of black people, but also to revise, interrogate, and re-examine the historical events of the past. First coined by Mark Dery in 1993, and explored in the late 1990s through conversations led by scholar Alondra Nelson,1 Afrofuturism addresses themes and concerns of the African diaspora through a technoculture and science fiction lens, encompassing a range of media and artists with a shared interest in envisioning black futures that stem from Afrodiasporic experiences.2 Seminal Afrofuturistic works include the novels of Samuel R. Delany and Octavia Butler; the canvases of Jean-Michel Basquiat and Angelbert Metoyer, and the photography of Renée Cox; the explicitly extraterrestrial mythoi of Parliament-Funkadelic, the Jonzun Crew, Warp 9, Deltron 3030, and Sun Ra; and the Marvel Comics superhero Black Panther.
    Wikipedia (visited Feb. 16, 2018)

    February 16, 2018

  • See vuja de.

    February 5, 2018

  • See vuja de.

    February 5, 2018

  • On a trip to London last month, I had at last the opportunity to read Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World, the new book by our keynote speaker for the InsideNGO 2016 Annual Conference, Adam Grant. Early in the book, Grant discusses how as human beings our nature is to "rationalize the status quo as legitimate." He calls this the "default system" and highlights the many perils of taking the status quo for granted and never questioning the default assumptions we make.

    To counter this, Grant suggests flipping the old idea of déjà vu where we encounter something new but feel like we have experienced it before to a new approach, vuja de. Vuja de, Grant writes, "is the reverse—we face something familiar, but we see it with a fresh perspective that enables us to gain new insight from old problems."

    Tom Dente, From déjà vu to vuja de: The Importance of New Perspectives, Humentum blog (June 8, 2016)

    February 5, 2018

  • I hadn't seen the "rose garden" sense before, but there it is.

    we were having photographs taken in the rosary outside Rosecliff Mansion
    Bryan Garner, Nino and Me (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2018), ch. 6

    January 22, 2018

  • See phubbing.

    January 21, 2018

  • an online sub-community of perpetrators has identified and dubbed the practice of nonconsensually removing condoms during sex "stealthing."
    Alexandra Brodsky, "Rape-Adjacent": Imagining Legal Responses to Nonconsensual Condom Removal, 32 Col. J. Gender & L. 183, 184 (2017)

    January 14, 2018

  • When Nazis and white supremacists rally, the antifa are likely to show up, too.

    Antifa” is short for antifascists, though the name by no means includes everyone who opposes fascism. The antifa is a relatively small movement of the far left, with ties to anarchism. It arose in Europe’s punk scene in the 1980s to fight neo-Nazism.

    The antifa says that because Nazism and white supremacy are violent, we must use any means necessary to stop them. This includes physical means, like what they did on my campus: forming a crowd to block ticket-holders from entering a venue to hear a right extremist speak.

    The antifa’s tactics often backfire, just like those of Germany’s communist opposition to Nazism did in the 1920s. Confrontations escalate. Public opinion often blames the left no matter the circumstances.

    Laurie Marhoefer, How Should We Protest Neo-Nazi? Lessons from German History, The Conversation (Aug. 21, 2017)

    January 4, 2018

  • Swatting, which has a long history in the online gaming world, refers to the practice of making an emergency call about a fake situation often involving a killing or hostages, in the hopes of sending police to the address of an adversary or random person.

    . . .

    . . . Swatting has been used as a tactic to harass and intimidate people across the country and is typically done with digital tools that disguise the caller’s location.

    . . .

    Rep. Katherine Clark, a Massachusetts Democrat, introduced an anti-swatting bill in 2015 — then was herself the victim of swatting.

    Eli Rosenberg & Herman Wong, A police officer fatally shot a man while responding to an emergency call now called a ‘swatting’ prank, Wash. Post, Dec. 30, 2017

    December 30, 2017

  • Swatting, which has a long history in the online gaming world, refers to the practice of making an emergency call about a fake situation often involving a killing or hostages, in the hopes of sending police to the address of an adversary or random person.

    . . .

    . . . Swatting has been used as a tactic to harass and intimidate people across the country and is typically done with digital tools that disguise the caller’s location.

    . . .

    Rep. Katherine Clark, a Massachusetts Democrat, introduced an anti-swatting bill in 2015 — then was herself the victim of swatting.

    Eli Rosenberg & Herman Wong, A police officer fatally shot a man while responding to an emergency call now called a ‘swatting’ prank, Wash. Post, Dec. 30, 2017

    December 30, 2017

  • The menu offers coffee, black tea, beer, wine and pastries, but nearly everyone opts for a $5 mug of kratom (pronounced KRAY-dum).

    A powder ground from the leaves of an indigenous Southeast Asian tree related to the coffee plant, kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) offers pain relief and mood enhancement, similar to prescription painkillers.

    Advocates say the substance, which does not depress the respiratory system and therefore presents little to no overdose risk, could help reduce the nation’s reliance on highly addictive and often deadly prescription painkillers. Some addiction experts also argue the plant could be used as an alternative to methadone, buprenorphine and Vivitrol in medication-assisted therapy for opioid addiction.

    Used for centuries to fight fatigue, pain and anxiety in Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea and Thailand, kratom was rarely taken in the United States until recently.

    Christine Vestal, As Kratom Use Surges, Some States Enact Bans, Stateline (Dec. 4, 2017)

    December 11, 2017

  • . . . it caused "harm" to trans people, for example by "dead-naming" a trans woman, that is, referring to her by her former male name.
    Making Sense of the Culture War over Transgender Identity, The Economist, Nov. 16, 2017

    November 22, 2017

  • A war of words has broken out between some transgender activists and women they call TERFs (trans-exclusionary radical feminists) about who should be let into women-only spaces, from domestic-violence refuges to women’s literary and sports competitions.
    Making Sense of the Culture War over Transgender Identity, The Economist, Nov. 16, 2017

    November 22, 2017

  • A war of words has broken out between some transgender activists and women they call TERFs (trans-exclusionary radical feminists) about who should be let into women-only spaces, from domestic-violence refuges to women’s literary and sports competitions.
    Making Sense of the Culture War over Transgender Identity, The Economist, Nov. 16, 2017

    November 22, 2017

  • A ghost gun is a firearm without serial numbers. The term is used by gun control advocates, gun rights advocates, law enforcement, and some in the firearm industry.1234 By making the gun themselves, owners may legally bypass background checks and registration regulations.1 Some ghost guns become part of the illicit firearms trade.5 Under U.S. federal law, the creation and possession of ghost guns is permitted, but a license is required to manufacture firearms for sale or distribution.
    Wikipedia
    When Kevin Neal went on a deadly shooting rampage last week in California, he was armed with at least two semi-automatic rifles, known as "ghost guns," that he didn't buy in a store or from a gun dealer, authorities say.

    "These arms are manufactured illegally, we believe, by him at his home," said Tehama County assistant sheriff Phil Johnston, during a news conference on Nov. 15.

    . . .

    Given Neal's criminal background, it was clearly illegal for him to possess these guns once they had been assembled.

    Brian Mann, Do-It-Yourself 'Ghost Guns' Bypass Background Checks And Firearm Registration, NPR, Nov. 21, 2017

    November 22, 2017

  • Our brains react to our world in milliseconds—faster than we’re consciously aware. And much of what drives our everyday decisions, including what we’ll watch, talk about and buy, are the emotional responses that traditional self-report methods alone can’t measure.

    That’s where consumer neuroscience comes in, a field that Nielsen has been in for nearly 10 years. Through neuroscience, we help brands understand consumers’ non-conscious engagement and responses, which they can use to create stronger connections with their audiences.

    We integrate best-in-class neuroscience technologies with traditional research methods, so that we, along with our clients, will learn faster, develop better testing protocols and deliver stronger results than anyone in the industry.

    Nielsen Consumer Neuroscience

    November 13, 2017

  • Remember Gamergate?

    Or when the identity of that dentist who killed Cecil the Lion was posted?

    Or that man who was wrongly identified as the Boston Marathon bomber?

    These were all examples of how making someone’s personal, and sometimes private, information public on the internet led to intense harassment.

    Today, each of the cases could easily be termed a form of doxxing — short for “dropping documents.” In the last few years, doxxing has increasingly been used as an online weapon to attack people. People’s “documents” — records of their addresses, relatives, finances — get posted online with the implicit or explicit invitation for others to shame or hector them.

    Decca Muldowney, So What the Hell Is Doxxing?, ProPublica, Nov. 4, 2017. The article also uses "dox" and "doxed."

    November 7, 2017

  • Remember Gamergate?

    Or when the identity of that dentist who killed Cecil the Lion was posted?

    Or that man who was wrongly identified as the Boston Marathon bomber?

    These were all examples of how making someone’s personal, and sometimes private, information public on the internet led to intense harassment.

    Today, each of the cases could easily be termed a form of doxxing — short for “dropping documents.” In the last few years, doxxing has increasingly been used as an online weapon to attack people. People’s “documents” — records of their addresses, relatives, finances — get posted online with the implicit or explicit invitation for others to shame or hector them.

    Decca Muldowney, So What the Hell Is Doxxing?, ProPublica, Nov. 4, 2017. The article also uses "dox" and "doxed."

    November 7, 2017

  • Tulane University economics professor James Alm researches tax compliance, tax evasion and an idea known as "tax morale."

    "Tax morale is an attempt to measure one’s intrinsic motivation to pay taxes," he explained.

    There’s a rate at which economists predict people would pay taxes based on the likelihood of getting caught and punished for not paying. In the U.S., more people pay more taxes and cheat less than what the “rational model” might suggest. Alm's research shows we have the highest tax morale of any developed country.

    Adriene Hill, How Americans Really Feel About Taxes, Marketplace (Sept. 27, 2017)

    Many researchers have suggested that the intrinsic motivation for individuals to pay taxes—what is sometimes termed their "tax morale"—differs across countries; that is, if taxpayer values are influenced by cultural norms, with different societal institutions acting as constraints and varying between different countries, then tax morale may be an important determinant of taxpayer compliance and other forms of behavior. However, isolating the reasons for these differences in tax morale is notoriously difficult.
    James Alm & Benno Torgler, Culture Differences and Tax Morale in the United Statesand in Europe, CREMA Working Paper No. 2004-14 (July 9, 2004)

    October 13, 2017

  • The term “jumpout” is slang in the D.C. area for infamous squads of armed police officers who conduct surprise “stop-and-frisk” maneuvers.
    Alec Karakatsanis, Policing, Mass Imprisonment, and the Failure of American Lawyers, 128 Harv. L. Rev. F. 253 (2015) (citing icole Flatow, If You Thought Stop-And-Frisk Was Bad, You Should Know About Jump-Outs, ThinkProgress (Dec. 11, 2014, 11:00 AM), http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2014/12/10/3468340/jump-outs http://perma.cc/F374-VL8L'>http://perma.cc/F374-VL8L).

    August 23, 2017

  • The term “jumpout” is slang in the D.C. area for infamous squads of armed police officers who conduct surprise “stop-and-frisk” maneuvers.
    Alec Karakatsanis, Policing, Mass Imprisonment, and the Failure of American Lawyers, 128 Harv. L. Rev. F. 253 (2015) (citing icole Flatow, If You Thought Stop-And-Frisk Was Bad, You Should Know About Jump-Outs, ThinkProgress (Dec. 11, 2014, 11:00 AM), http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2014/12/10/3468340/jump-outs http://perma.cc/F374-VL8L'>http://perma.cc/F374-VL8L).

    August 23, 2017

  • Also, it’s important to consider that there are different types of coding in blockchain. Alber divided them into two categories: ‘wet code’ and ‘dry code’. Dry code, he said, comprises transferring a piece of intellectual property, like a novel, through the blockchain, and hashing it so only those with the appropriate decryption key could access it. All conditions regarding transfer can be expressed inside the blockchain, and ownership can be transferred without human involvement. On the other hand, wet code can be used for something like a lease hold, where someone might have to go in and apply, say, building conditions.
    Ian Lopez, Where Blockchain Finds a Home in Law, Legaltech News, Aug. 18, 2017

    August 23, 2017

  • Also, it’s important to consider that there are different types of coding in blockchain. Alber divided them into two categories: ‘wet code’ and ‘dry code’. Dry code, he said, comprises transferring a piece of intellectual property, like a novel, through the blockchain, and hashing it so only those with the appropriate decryption key could access it. All conditions regarding transfer can be expressed inside the blockchain, and ownership can be transferred without human involvement. On the other hand, wet code can be used for something like a lease hold, where someone might have to go in and apply, say, building conditions.
    Ian Lopez, Where Blockchain Finds a Home in Law, Legaltech News, Aug. 18, 2017

    August 23, 2017

  • The house was a sober living house or "sober home" — a kind of privately owned halfway house intended to integrate recovering drug and alcohol users back into community life and help them stay on the right path.
    Peter Haden, 'Body Brokers' Get Kickbacks To Lure People With Addictions To Bad Rehab, All Things Considered, Aug. 15, 2017

    Sober living houses (SLHs) are alcohol and drug free living environments for individuals attempting to abstain from alcohol and drugs. They are not licensed or funded by state or local governments and the residents themselves pay for costs.
    Douglas L. Polcin et al., What Did We Learn from Our Study on Sober Living Houses and Where Do We Go from Here?, J. Psychoactive Drugs, Dec. 2010

    August 17, 2017

  • The house was a sober living house or "sober home" — a kind of privately owned halfway house intended to integrate recovering drug and alcohol users back into community life and help them stay on the right path.
    Peter Haden, 'Body Brokers' Get Kickbacks To Lure People With Addictions To Bad Rehab, All Things Considered, Aug. 15, 2017

    Sober living houses (SLHs) are alcohol and drug free living environments for individuals attempting to abstain from alcohol and drugs. They are not licensed or funded by state or local governments and the residents themselves pay for costs.
    Douglas L. Polcin et al., What Did We Learn from Our Study on Sober Living Houses and Where Do We Go from Here?, J. Psychoactive Drugs, Dec. 2010

    August 17, 2017

  • The house was a sober living house or "sober home" — a kind of privately owned halfway house intended to integrate recovering drug and alcohol users back into community life and help them stay on the right path.
    Peter Haden, 'Body Brokers' Get Kickbacks To Lure People With Addictions To Bad Rehab, All Things Considered, Aug. 15, 2017

    Sober living houses (SLHs) are alcohol and drug free living environments for individuals attempting to abstain from alcohol and drugs. They are not licensed or funded by state or local governments and the residents themselves pay for costs.
    Douglas L. Polcin et al., What Did We Learn from Our Study on Sober Living Houses and Where Do We Go from Here?, J. Psychoactive Drugs, Dec. 2010

    August 17, 2017

  • The house was a sober living house or "sober home" — a kind of privately owned halfway house intended to integrate recovering drug and alcohol users back into community life and help them stay on the right path.
    Peter Haden, 'Body Brokers' Get Kickbacks To Lure People With Addictions To Bad Rehab, All Things Considered, Aug. 15, 2017

    Sober living houses (SLHs) are alcohol and drug free living environments for individuals attempting to abstain from alcohol and drugs. They are not licensed or funded by state or local governments and the residents themselves pay for costs.
    Douglas L. Polcin et al., What Did We Learn from Our Study on Sober Living Houses and Where Do We Go from Here?, J. Psychoactive Drugs, Dec. 2010

    August 17, 2017

  • The first step for unscrupulous rehab centers: Recruiting clients who have good health insurance. That's created a whole new industry — something called patient brokering or "body brokering.

    The corrupt owner of a drug treatment center might pay $500 per week in kickbacks to the operators of sober homes who send them clients with health insurance . . . ."

    Delray Beach authorities say body brokers used to target recovering drug users hanging out on the patio of a local Starbucks. The coffee shop restricted access to the patio in 2015, after a meeting with the city officials and the police department.

    Peter Haden, 'Body Brokers' Get Kickbacks To Lure People With Addictions To Bad Rehab, All Things Considered, Aug. 15, 2017

    August 17, 2017

  • The first step for unscrupulous rehab centers: Recruiting clients who have good health insurance. That's created a whole new industry — something called patient brokering or "body brokering.

    The corrupt owner of a drug treatment center might pay $500 per week in kickbacks to the operators of sober homes who send them clients with health insurance . . . ."

    Delray Beach authorities say body brokers used to target recovering drug users hanging out on the patio of a local Starbucks. The coffee shop restricted access to the patio in 2015, after a meeting with the city officials and the police department.

    Peter Haden, 'Body Brokers' Get Kickbacks To Lure People With Addictions To Bad Rehab, All Things Considered, Aug. 15, 2017

    August 17, 2017

  • The first step for unscrupulous rehab centers: Recruiting clients who have good health insurance. That's created a whole new industry — something called patient brokering or "body brokering.

    The corrupt owner of a drug treatment center might pay $500 per week in kickbacks to the operators of sober homes who send them clients with health insurance . . . ."

    Delray Beach authorities say body brokers used to target recovering drug users hanging out on the patio of a local Starbucks. The coffee shop restricted access to the patio in 2015, after a meeting with the city officials and the police department.

    Peter Haden, 'Body Brokers' Get Kickbacks To Lure People With Addictions To Bad Rehab, All Things Considered, Aug. 15, 2017

    August 17, 2017

  • Introduced by Rep. Mike Simpson, R-Idaho, and Kurt Schrader, D-Ore., the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act would put an end to federal policy that amounts to throwing good money after bad. The bill, which is co-sponsored by a bipartisan group of 16 representatives, targets the practice of “fire borrowing” in the suppression of wildfires.

    In short, the approach forces federal agencies to redirect money from other areas — namely, forest management and fire prevention — when the cost of fighting fires exceeds expectations. This leaves less money for prevention, which exacerbates the fires in future years.

    In Our View: Put Out 'Fire Borrowing', The Columbian, June 19, 2017

    Fire borrowing is a budgetary practice that occurs when federal agencies divert funds from forest health and fire prevention programs to fight wildfires.
    Western Governors Urge Congress: Make End to 'Fire Borrowing' Top Priority, Western Governors' Association, Nov. 15, 2016

    August 8, 2017

  • Young adults living in poverty face high exposure to “go throughs”: lived experiences of structural disadvantage and trauma with lasting implications for educational, economic, and other life outcomes. They frequently “get through” these challenges without formal mental health supports, relying on community-based programs and peer networks to cope with their experiences.

    Go Throughs to Get Through: Low Income Young Adults and Mental Health, CLASP (June 5, 2017)

    August 8, 2017

  • Yes, the most “delicate” way to spruce up century-old sculptures is to hit them with pellets of dry ice at supersonic speeds. That’s the badass science of fine art conservation for you.
The formal name for the technique is “carbon dioxide cleaning,” and it actually has all kinds of applications: removing particles from electric circuits, cleaning telescope mirrors, preparing laboratory samples, manufacturing metal parts. But at the Freer, the objective was to scour away the protective wax layer that coats the Saint-Gaudens statues. This would allow conservators to clean and polish the bronze underneath before applying a fresh wax coating and placing the figures back on their

    pedestals.

    Sarah Kaplan, Museum uses micro explosions to save fine art from bird poop, Wash. Post, July 19, 2017

    July 24, 2017

  • Trump — a known germaphobe — is not a natural hugger. But every time he meets “angel moms,” whose children have been killed by illegal immigrants, they expect to receive an embrace from the president.

    . . .

    While Obama showcased Dreamers at State of the Union addresses, Trump invited angel families to sit in first lady Melania Trump’s box during his address to Congress in February.

    Ashley Parker et al., Trump's Wall: What's Behind the President's Fixation on Immigration?, Wash. Post, July 19, 2017

    July 24, 2017

  • Trump — a known germaphobe — is not a natural hugger. But every time he meets “angel moms,” whose children have been killed by illegal immigrants, they expect to receive an embrace from the president.

    . . .

    While Obama showcased Dreamers at State of the Union addresses, Trump invited angel families to sit in first lady Melania Trump’s box during his address to Congress in February.

    Ashley Parker et al., Trump's Wall: What's Behind the President's Fixation on Immigration?, Wash. Post, July 19, 2017

    July 24, 2017

  • Another noun sense:

    At Hoover's request, (Attorney General) Brownell had asked congressional committee chairmen for new laws allowing wiretapping without a warrant. They had said no, time and again. Hoover had asked for the legal authorization for microphone surveillances—bugging, or "technicals," in Bureauspeak—but the lawmakers spurned the request.
    Tim Weiner, Enemies: A History of the FBI (New York: Random House, 2012), p. 192

    July 19, 2017

  • A condition characterized by rampant boondoggles.

    The FBI's intelligence division chief, Al Belmont, told General Doolittle's investigative group

    the CIA was shot through with "waste, inefficiency, and plain boondogglery."
    Tim Weiner, Enemies: A History of the FBI (New York: Random House, 2012), p. 189

    July 19, 2017

  • Morris agreed to create a legend—a ghost job with false credentials—in Paramount's Berlin office. The legendlegend served as a deep cover for Vassili Zarubin, later chief of Soviet espionage in the United States during World War II.
    Tim Weiner, Enemies: A History of the FBI (New York: Random House, 2012), p. 181

    July 19, 2017

  • Attorney General Thomas Gregory

    authorized the Bureau of Investigation to round up the "slackers"—men who had failed to register for the military draft—in the spring and summers of 1918.
    Tim Weiner, Enemies: A History of the FBI (New York: Random House, 2012), p. 16

    July 19, 2017

  • Rhythm and meter are the engine driving virtually all music, and it is likely that they were the very first elements used by our ancestors to make protomusics, a tradition we still hear today in tribal drumming, and in the rituals of various preindustrial cultures. While I believe timbre is now at the center of our approciation of music, rhythm has held supreme power over listeners for much longer..
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 55

    June 19, 2017

  • Rhythm and meter are the engine driving virtually all music, and it is likely that they were the very first elements used by our ancestors to make protomusics, a tradition we still hear today in tribal drumming, and in the rituals of various preindustrial cultures. While I believe timbre is now at the center of our approciation of music, rhythm has held supreme power over listeners for much longer..
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 55

    June 19, 2017

  • The organ player typically has control over which of these supplementary pipes he wants to blow air through by pulling and pushing levers, or drawbars, that direct the flow of air. Knowing that clarinets have a lot of energy in the odd harmonics of the overtone series, a clever organ player could simulate the sound of a clarinet by manipulating drawbars in such a way as to recreate the overtone series of that instrument.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 48

    June 19, 2017

  • When you hear a saxophone playing a tone with a fundamental frequency of 220 Hz, you are actually hearing many tones, not just one. The other tones you hear are integer multiples of the fundamental: 440, 660, . . . . These different tones—the overtones—have different intensities, and so we hear them as having different loudnesses for these tones is distinctive of the saxophone, and they are what give rise to its unique tonal color, its unique sound—its timbre. . . . Indeed, for each instrument, there exists a unique pattern of overtones. . . . Virtually all of the tonal variation we hear—the quality that gives a trumpet its trumpetiness and that gives a piano its pianoness—comes from the unique way in which the loudnesses of the overtones are distributed.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 46

    June 19, 2017

  • When you hear a saxophone playing a tone with a fundamental frequency of 220 Hz, you are actually hearing many tones, not just one. The other tones you hear are integer multiples of the fundamental: 440, 660, . . . . These different tones—the overtones—have different intensities, and so we hear them as having different loudnesses for these tones is distinctive of the saxophone, and they are what give rise to its unique tonal color, its unique sound—its timbre. . . . Indeed, for each instrument, there exists a unique pattern of overtones. . . . Virtually all of the tonal variation we hear—the quality that gives a trumpet its trumpetiness and that gives a piano its pianoness—comes from the unique way in which the loudnesses of the overtones are distributed.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 46

    June 19, 2017

  • When you hear a saxophone playing a tone with a fundamental frequency of 220 Hz, you are actually hearing many tones, not just one. The other tones you hear are integer multiples of the fundamental: 440, 660, . . . . These different tones—the overtones—have different intensities, and so we hear them as having different loudnesses for these tones is distinctive of the saxophone, and they are what give rise to its unique tonal color, its unique sound—its timbre. . . . Indeed, for each instrument, there exists a unique pattern of overtones. . . . Virtually all of the tonal variation we hear—the quality that gives a trumpet its trumpetiness and that gives a piano its pianoness—comes from the unique way in which the loudnesses of the overtones are distributed.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 46

    June 19, 2017

  • If a musician is playing the white keys, how do I know if he is playing the A minor scale or the C major scale? The answer is that—entirely without our conscious awareness—our brains are keeping track of how many times particular notes are sounded, where they appear in terms of strong versus weak beats, and how long they last. A computational process in the brain makes an inference about the key we're in based on these properties. This is another example of something that most of us can do even without musical training, and what psychologist call declarative knowledge—the ability to talk about it . . . .
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 38

    June 19, 2017

  • The basilar membrane of the inner ear contains hair cells that are frequency selective, firing only in response to a certain band of frequencies. These are stretched out across the membrane from low frequencies to high; low-frequency sounds excite hair cells on one end of the basilar membrane, medium frequency sounds excite the hair cells in the middle, and high-frequency sounds excite them at the other end. . . . Because the different tones are spread out across the surface topography of the membrane, this is called a tonotopic map.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 28

    June 19, 2017

  • The basilar membrane of the inner ear contains hair cells that are frequency selective, firing only in response to a certain band of frequencies. These are stretched out across the membrane from low frequencies to high; low-frequency sounds excite hair cells on one end of the basilar membrane, medium frequency sounds excite the hair cells in the middle, and high-frequency sounds excite them at the other end. . . . Because the different tones are spread out across the surface topography of the membrane, this is called a tonotopic map.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 28

    June 19, 2017

  • The basilar membrane of the inner ear contains hair cells that are frequency selective, firing only in response to a certain band of frequencies. These are stretched out across the membrane from low frequencies to high; low-frequency sounds excite hair cells on one end of the basilar membrane, medium frequency sounds excite the hair cells in the middle, and high-frequency sounds excite them at the other end. . . . Because the different tones are spread out across the surface topography of the membrane, this is called a tonotopic map.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 28

    June 19, 2017

  • The notion of relative pitch values is seen readily in the way that we speak. When you ask someone a question, your voice naturally rises in intonation at the end of the sentence, signaling that you are asking. . . . This is a convention in English (thought not in all languages—we have to learn it), and is known in linguistics as a prosodic cue.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 27

    Sing. pinna

    June 19, 2017

  • Sound waves impinge on the eardrums and pinnae (the fleshy parts of your ear), setting off a chain of mechanical and neurochemical events, the end product of which is an internal mental image we call pitch.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 24

    Sing. pinna

    June 19, 2017

  • The official definition of the Acoustical Society of America is that timbre is everything about a sound that is not loudness or pitch. So much for scientific precision!
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 19

    June 19, 2017

  • Psychophysicists—scientists who study the ways that the brain interacts with the physical world—have shown that these attributes are separable. Each can be varied without altering the others, allowing the scientific study of one at a time.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 17

    June 19, 2017

  • Psychophysicists—scientists who study the ways that the brain interacts with the physical world—have shown that these attributes are separable. Each can be varied without altering the others, allowing the scientific study of one at a time.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 17

    June 19, 2017

  • The term “commuter” includes anybody who has a job and doesn’t work at home.
    Tim Henderson, In Most States, a Spike in 'Super Commuters', Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), June 5, 2017

    June 12, 2017

  • The number of commuters who travel 90 minutes or more to get to work increased sharply between 2010 and 2015, a shift that traffic experts, real estate analysts and others attribute to skyrocketing housing costs and a reluctance to move, born of memories of the 2008 financial crisis.

    In all but 10 states, the number of “super commuters” increased over the period, and in California, Hawaii, Massachusetts, North Dakota and Rhode Island, it grew by more than 40 percent, according to census data.

    Tim Henderson, In Most States, a Spike in 'Super Commuters', Stateline (Pew Charitable Trusts), June 5, 2017

    June 12, 2017

  • Harvard researchers have designed robots to address various medical applications, from helping hearts pump blood to fighting cancer. Now, they’re adding a new accomplishment to their list: improving mobility. Two research teams have tackled this challenge by designing a special type of robot called an exosuit: a soft, flexible robotic device that people can wear like another layer of clothing.
    Alisha Ukani, These Bots Were Made for Walking, Harvard Magazine, June 8, 2017

    June 9, 2017

  • One associate referred to Comey’s preparation as a kind of “murder board” — a phrase used to describe a committee of questioners that hurls tough questions at someone as practice for a difficult oral examination.
    Devlin Barrett et al., Comey prepared extensively for his conversations with Trump, Wash. Post, May 18, 2017

    May 19, 2017

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Comments for maryw

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  • Your citations are inspiring. I’ve been lazy about using the blockquote HTML tag—but no more! Thank you for your precision and dedication.

    November 23, 2018

  • You have an unclosed italic bracket on sung-through which borks the formatting of everything that comes after it on the Community page and on your own comments feed.

    May 23, 2016

  • j/k, no probs about the glitchygloops. Everyone who's been here a while has borked something or another.

    April 5, 2016

  • Should have got a good phone.

    April 5, 2016

  • I hear you about editing from a phone--but don't give up, MaryW! I enjoy your citations.

    April 4, 2016

  • bilby, you must have been right on it. I edited out the extraneous stuff within a minute or so.

    I've learned my lesson: don't try to do much here with my iPhone: it's too hard to proofread and edit.

    April 4, 2016

  • Please take care not to unncessarily include site menus in copy-pasted comments.

    April 4, 2016

  • In many cases "See citation on word" is also a good option.

    February 29, 2016

  • You have an unclosed italic HTML bracket on elytron.

    December 27, 2015