Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. One that audits accounts.
  • n. One who audits a course.
  • n. One who hears; a listener.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. One who audits bookkeeping accounts.
  • n. In many jurisdictions, an elected or appointed public official in charge of the public accounts; a comptroller.
  • n. One who audits an academic course; who attends the lectures but does not earn academic credit.
  • n. One who listens as a member of an audience
  • n. One trained to perform spiritual guidance procedures.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A hearer or listener.
  • n. A person appointed and authorized to audit or examine an account or accounts, compare the charges with the vouchers, examine the parties and witnesses, allow or reject charges, and state the balance.
  • n. One who hears judicially, as in an audience court.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A hearer; one who listens to what is said; a member of an auditory.
  • n. Same as audient, n.
  • n. A person appointed and authorized to examine an account or accounts, compare the charges with the vouchers, examine parties and witnesses, allow or reject charges, and state the result.
  • n. One of certain officers of high rank at the papal court: so called from their connection with business treated of in audiences with the pope: as, auditor of the apostolic chamber; auditor of the pope; auditors of the Roman rota (which see).

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a student who attends a course but does not take it for credit
  • n. a qualified accountant who inspects the accounting records and practices of a business or other organization
  • n. someone who listens attentively

Etymologies

Middle English, from Anglo-Norman auditour, from Latin audītor, listener, from audīre, to hear; see au- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Anglo-Norman auditour, from Latin audītor ("hearer, auditor"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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