Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • transitive verb To toss or throw back and forth.
  • transitive verb To hit (a ball, for example) back and forth.
  • transitive verb To give and receive (words, for example); exchange.
  • transitive verb To discuss in a casual or frivolous manner.
  • adjective Bowed or bent in an outward curve.
  • noun A game resembling field hockey but played on ice by skaters.
  • noun A stick, bent at one end, used in playing this game.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A kind of cart or buggy much used in India. See extracts.
  • Marked with bands or stripes.
  • To throw or strike to and fro, or from side to side, as a ball in play.
  • To toss aside; drive or send off.
  • To toss about, as from man to man; pass from one to another, or back and forth.
  • To give and take; exchange, especially contentiously: as, to bandy compliments; to bandy words, reproaches, etc.
  • To discuss; debate.
  • To band together; league: chiefly reflexive.
  • To bound, as a ball that is struck.
  • To form a band or league.
  • To contend; strive, whether in emulation or in enmity.
  • Having a bend or crook outward: said of a person's legs: as, his legs are quite bandy.
  • Limp; without sufficient substance: said of bad cloth.
  • noun A particular manner of playing tennis, the nature of which is not now known.
  • noun A stroke with a racket, or a ball so struck; a return at tennis.
  • noun A game played with a bent club, better known as hockey, and, in the United States, shinny (which see).
  • noun A club bent at the end, used in the game of hockey or bandy-ball; a shinny or shinty.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A club bent at the lower part for striking a ball at play; a hockey stick.
  • noun The game played with such a club; hockey; shinney; bandy ball.
  • noun A carriage or cart used in India, esp. one drawn by bullocks.
  • transitive verb To beat to and fro, as a ball in playing at bandy.
  • transitive verb To give and receive reciprocally; to exchange.
  • transitive verb To toss about, as from person to person; to circulate freely in a light manner; -- of ideas, facts, rumors, etc.
  • adjective Bent; crooked; curved laterally, esp. with the convex side outward.
  • intransitive verb To contend, as at some game in which each strives to drive the ball his own way.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Bowlegged, or bending outward at the knees; as in bandy legged.
  • noun sports A winter sport played on ice, from which ice hockey has developed.
  • verb To give and receive reciprocally; to exchange.
  • verb To use or pass about casually.
  • verb To throw or strike reciprocally, like balls in sports.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb discuss lightly
  • adjective have legs that curve outward at the knees
  • verb exchange blows
  • verb toss or strike a ball back and forth

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Origin unknown.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Scots bandy

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Possibly from the Welsh word bando most likely derived from the Proto-Germanic *bandja (“a curved stick”).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle French, from bander. Cognate with banter.

Examples

  • Golf and hockey are also played, and "bandy" -- _i. e._, hockey on the ice -- is a favourite winter sport.

    Denmark

  • There is a kind of exercise that they have among them much like that which boys call bandy in English. 135 Likewise, they have the exercise of football. 136 In this they only use the foot forcibly to carry the ball from the one to the other.

    Colonial Children

  • Highlanders called him, Gow Chrom, that is, the bandy-legged smith --- fought well, and contributed greatly to the fate of the battle, without knowing which side he fought on; --- so, ` ` To fight for your own hand, like

    Rob Roy

  • Highlanders called him, _Gow Chrom, _ that is, the bandy-legged smith -- fought well, and contributed greatly to the fate of the battle, without knowing which side he fought on; -- so, "To fight for your own hand, like Henry Wynd," passed into a proverb.

    Rob Roy — Complete

  • Highlanders called him, _Gow Chrom, _ that is, the bandy-legged smith -- fought well, and contributed greatly to the fate of the battle, without knowing which side he fought on; -- so, "To fight for your own hand, like Henry Wynd," passed into a proverb.

    Rob Roy — Volume 02

  • The name "bandy" is sometimes applied also to shinney or shinty and in

    Outdoor Sports and Games

  • Here they have "bandy" matches, ski-ing, and tobogganing, as well as other winter games.

    Denmark

  • Chrom, that is, the bandy-legged smith — fought well, and contributed greatly to the fate of the battle, without knowing which side he fought on; — so, “To fight for your own hand, like Henry

    Rob Roy

  • And his legs are what his regiment call bandy, oh! "

    The Mirror of Taste, and Dramatic Censor Volume I, Number 1

  • Wynd -- or, as the Highlanders called him, _Gow Chrom_, that is, the bandy-legged smith -- fought well, and contributed greatly to the fate of the battle, without knowing which side he fought on; -- so, 'To fight for your ain hand, like Henry Wynd,' passed into a proverb. "

    The Proverbs of Scotland

Comments

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  • A carriage or cart used in India and Sri Lanka, especially one drawn by bullocks.

    October 22, 2008