Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A tool or instrument used in doing work: a gardening implement. See Synonyms at tool.
  • n. An article used to outfit or equip.
  • n. A means of achieving an end; an instrument or agent.
  • transitive v. To put into practical effect; carry out: implement the new procedures.
  • transitive v. To supply with implements.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A tool or instrument for working with.
  • v. to bring about; to put into practice
  • v. to carry out; to do

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. That which fulfills or supplies a want or use; esp., an instrument, tool, or utensil, as supplying a requisite to an end.
  • transitive v. To accomplish; to fulfill.
  • transitive v. To provide with an implement or implements; to cause to be fulfilled, satisfied, or carried out, by means of an implement or implements.
  • transitive v. To fulfill or perform, as a contract or an engagement.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To fulfil or satisfy the conditions of; accomplish.
  • To fulfil or perform; carry into effect or execution: as, to implement a contract or decree.
  • To provide, supply, or fit with implements or instrumental means.
  • n. The act of fulfilling or performing: as, in implement of a contract.
  • n. Whatever may supply a want; especially, an instrument, tool, or utensil; an instrumental appliance or means: as, the implements of trade or of husbandry.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. ensure observance of laws and rules
  • v. apply in a manner consistent with its purpose or design
  • v. pursue to a conclusion or bring to a successful issue
  • n. instrumentation (a piece of equipment or tool) used to effect an end

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English, supplementary payment, from Old French emplement, act of filling, from Late Latin implēmentum, from Latin implēre, to fill up : in-, intensive pref.; see in-2 + plēre, to fill.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Late Latin implēmentum ("a filling up"), from Latin impleō ("I fill up").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Scottish English or Scots implement ("fulfill")

Examples

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