Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • intransitive v. To come into view as a massive, distorted, or indistinct image: "I faced the icons that loomed through the veil of incense” ( Fergus M. Bordewich). See Synonyms at appear.
  • intransitive v. To appear to the mind in a magnified and threatening form: "Stalin looms over the whole human tragedy of 1930-1933” ( Robert Conquest).
  • intransitive v. To seem imminent; impend: Revolution loomed but the aristocrats paid no heed.
  • n. A distorted, threatening appearance of something, as through fog or darkness.
  • n. An apparatus for making thread or yarn into cloth by weaving strands together at right angles.
  • transitive v. To weave (a tapestry, for example) on a loom.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. loon (bird of order Gaviformes)
  • v. to impend; to threaten or hang over
  • n. A utensil; tool; a weapon; (usually in compound) an article in general.
  • n. A frame or machine of wood or other material, in which a weaver forms cloth out of thread; a machine for interweaving yarn or threads into a fabric, as in knitting or lace making
  • n. That part of an oar which is near the grip or handle and inboard from the rowlock

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. See loon, the bird.
  • n. A frame or machine of wood or other material, in which a weaver forms cloth out of thread; a machine for interweaving yarn or threads into a fabric, as in knitting or lace making.
  • n. That part of an oar which is near the grip or handle and inboard from the rowlock.
  • intransitive v. To appear above the surface either of sea or land, or to appear enlarged, or distorted and indistinct, as a distant object, a ship at sea, or a mountain, esp. from atmospheric influences
  • intransitive v. To rise and to be eminent; to be elevated or ennobled, in a moral sense.
  • intransitive v. To become imminent; to impend.
  • n. The state of looming; esp., an unnatural and indistinct appearance of elevation or enlargement of anything, as of land or of a ship, seen by one at sea.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A utensil; a tool; a weapon; an article in general: now used only in composition, as in heir-loom, workloom, etc. See heirloom.
  • n. A machine for weaving any fabric from yarn or thread.
  • n. The part of an oar between the blade and the handle; the shaft.
  • n. A chimney.
  • To weave.
  • To shine.
  • Specifically To appear indistinctly; come dimly into view, as from below the horizon or through a mist; rise up before the vision so as to give the impression of indistinct bulk or largeness: stand out prominently in the prospect: often used figuratively.
  • n. A coming indistinctly or vaguely into view; also, the indistinct or unnaturally enlarged appearance of anything, as land, seen at a distance or through a fog. See looming.
  • n. The track of a fish.
  • n. A loon. See loon.
  • n. A guillemot.
  • To put into or adjust in a loom.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. come into view indistinctly, often threateningly
  • v. weave on a loom
  • v. hang over, as of something threatening, dark, or menacing
  • n. a textile machine for weaving yarn into a textile
  • v. appear very large or occupy a commanding position

Etymologies

Perhaps of Scandinavian origin.
Middle English lome, from Old English gelōma, tool : ge-, collective pref.; see yclept + -lōma, tool (as in handlōman, tools).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old Norse ljóma ("to shine") (Wiktionary)
From Middle English lome, from Old English lōma, ġelōma ("tool, utensil, implement, article of furniture, household effect") (also as andlōma, andġelōma, andlāma ("utensil, instrument, implement, tool, vessel"), of uncertain origin. Cognate with Middle Dutch allame ("tool"). Perhaps originally meaning "a thing of frequent use", in which case, akin to Old English ġelōme ("often, frequently, continually, repeatedly"), from Proto-Germanic *ga- + Proto-Germanic *lōmiz, *lōmjaz (“lame, halt”), from Proto-Indo-European *lem- (“to break, soften”). Compare Old High German giluomo, kilōmo ("often, frequently"), Old English lama ("lame"). See lame. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.