Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Directed and received by each toward the other; reciprocal.
  • adjective Having the same relationship to each other.
  • adjective Possessed in common.
  • adjective Of, relating to, or in the form of mutual insurance.
  • noun A mutual fund.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Based on the principle of mutuality in sharing both burdens and benefits: as, a mutual insurance company.
  • Reciprocally given and received; pertaining alike or reciprocally to both sides; interchanged: as, mutual love; to entertain a mutual aversion.
  • Equally relating to or affecting two or more together; common to two or more combined; depending on, proceeding from, or exhibiting a certain community of action; shared alike.
  • Common: used in this sense loosely and improperly (but not infrequently, and by many writers of high rank), especially in the phrase a mutual friend.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Reciprocally acting or related; reciprocally receiving and giving; reciprocally given and received; reciprocal; interchanged
  • adjective Possessed, experienced, or done by two or more persons or things at the same time; common; joint
  • adjective agreement among a number of persons to insure each other against loss, as by fire, death, or accident.
  • adjective one which does a business of insurance on the mutual principle, the policy holders sharing losses and profits pro rata.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Having the same relationship, each to each other.
  • adjective Reciprocal.
  • adjective Possessed in common.
  • adjective Owned by the members.
  • noun A mutual fund, etc.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective common to or shared by two or more parties
  • adjective concerning each of two or more persons or things; especially given or done in return

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[French mutuel, from Old French, from Latin mūtuus, borrowed; see mei- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle French mutuel, from Latin mutuus.

Examples

    Sorry, no example sentences found.

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