Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A model of excellence or perfection of a kind; a peerless example: a paragon of virtue.
  • n. An unflawed diamond weighing at least 100 carats.
  • n. A very large spherical pearl.
  • n. Printing A type size of 20 points.
  • transitive v. To compare; parallel.
  • transitive v. To equal; match.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A flawless diamond of at least 100 carats.
  • v. To compare; to parallel; to put in rivalry or emulation with.
  • v. To compare with; to equal; to rival.
  • v. To serve as a model for; to surpass.
  • v. To be equal; to hold comparison.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A companion; a match; an equal.
  • n. Emulation; rivalry; competition.
  • n. A model or pattern
  • n. A size of type between great primer and double pica. See the Note under Type.
  • intransitive v. To be equal; to hold comparison.
  • transitive v. To compare; to parallel; to put in rivalry or emulation with.
  • transitive v. To compare with; to equal; to rival.
  • transitive v. To serve as a model for; to surpass.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To compare; parallel; mention in comparison or competition.
  • To admit comparison with; rival; equal.
  • To go beyond; excel; surpass.
  • To compare; pretend to comparison or equality.
  • n. A model or pattern; especially, a model or pattern of special excellence or perfection.
  • n. A companion; fellow; mate.
  • n. A rival.
  • n. Rivalry; emulation; hence, comparison; a test of excellence or superiority.
  • n. A stuff, embroidered or plain, used for dress and upholstery in the seventeenth century.
  • n. A diamond weighing more than 100 carats.
  • n. A size of printing-type, about lines to the inch, the intermediate of the larger size double small-pica and the smaller size great-primer, equal to 20 points, and so distinguished in the new system of sizes.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. model of excellence or perfection of a kind; one having no equal
  • n. an ideal instance; a perfect embodiment of a concept

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Obsolete French, from Old French, from Old Italian paragone, from paragonare, to test on a touchstone, perhaps from Greek parakonān, to sharpen : para-, alongside; see para-1 + akonē, whetstone; see ak- in Indo-European roots.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Anglo-Norman paragone, peragone, Middle French paragon, from Italian paragone ("comparison"), from paragonare, from Ancient Greek παρακονάω (parakonaō, "I sharpen, whet"), from παρά (para) + ἀκόνη (akonē, "whetstone").

Examples

Comments

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  • "Even his friends and business associates, men and women alike, were paragons of health: avoiders of fatty foods, moderate drinkers, health-club habitues, lovers of cross-country skiing, weekend canoe trips, and daylong hikes in the North Woods."

    - Alvin Greenberg, 'How the Dead Live'.

    June 9, 2009

  • Isn't this the prescription drug for parago?

    May 8, 2009

  • A paragon is peerless, but to paragon something is to compare or make it equal.

    August 14, 2008