Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A frozen dessert made mainly of fruit juice or fruit purée, usually with sugar and milk or cream.
  • noun Chiefly British A usually fruit-flavored effervescent powder, eaten as candy or made into a drink.
  • noun Australian An alcoholic beverage, especially beer.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A favorite cooling drink of the East, made of fruit-juices diluted with water, and variously sweetened and flarvored. It is cooled with snow when this can be procured.
  • noun A water-ice, variously flavored.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A refreshing drink, common in the East, made of the juice of some fruit, diluted, sweetened, and flavored in various ways
  • noun A flavored water ice.
  • noun A preparation of bicarbonate of soda, tartaric acid, sugar, etc., variously flavored, for making an effervescing drink; -- called also sherbet powder.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A food of frozen fruit juice with a dairy product such as milk added; a sorbet with dairy ingredients.
  • noun A powder made of bicarbonate of soda, sugar and flavourings, intended to be eaten alone or mixed with water to make a drink.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a frozen dessert made primarily of fruit juice and sugar, but also containing milk or egg-white or gelatin

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Ottoman Turkish, sweet fruit drink, from Persian šarbat, from Arabic šarba, drink, from šariba, to drink; see śrb in Semitic roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Turkish şerbet, from Persian شربت (šarbat), from Arabic شربة (shárba).

Examples

  • His relationship with Imam Abu Hanifah was quite complex; and he later had him arrested, and had him killed by poisoned sherbet the word sherbet is from the Arabic word sharabat--beverages according to some accounts.

    Monday, October 31, 2005

  • The sherbet is good; she has mixed it so that the tartness of the fruit still tells beneath the syrup. next »

    Excerpt: People of the Book by Geraldine Brooks

  • However, this sherbet is so good that, in my opinion, it is worth enjoying more than once a year.

    Cranberry Sherbet « Baking History

  • However, this sherbet is so good that, in my opinion, it is worth enjoying more than once a year.

    2007 October « Baking History

  • This piece featured pretty partnering by men in breeches and women in short sherbet-green tutus, but ultimately it seemed to be about the women in California Ballet and about the company's future.

    Fore, right!

  • It seemed too creamy to be called sherbet, but chef/co-owner Veronica Laramie explained that if it contains dairy and eggs, it's ice cream; if it contains dairy and no eggs, it's sherbet.

    Anneli Rufus: World's Biggest DQ Opens

  • It seemed too creamy to be called sherbet, but chef/co-owner Veronica Laramie explained that if it contains dairy and eggs, it's ice cream; if it contains dairy and no eggs, it's sherbet.

    Anneli Rufus: World's Biggest DQ Opens

  • I know "sherbert" is a colloquialism, but it is spelled "sherbet"--the other spelling isn't recognized at all by the OED or the spellchecker on this site.

    Really? I Mean, Really?!? (Yes, MORE Turkey Wrecks)

  • Traditional sherbet, which is Arabic in origin, is a frozen mixture of sweetened fruit juice and water and occasionally, wine.

    Archive 2007-08-01

  • Traditional sherbet, which is Arabic in origin, is a frozen mixture of sweetened fruit juice and water and occasionally, wine.

    Ciao Bella Lebanese Yogurt Sherbet

Comments

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  • My stepmother pronounces it sherbert. She's from Texas so I cut her a little slack.

    July 25, 2007

  • Interesting! Most people in this area (mid-Atlantic) pronounce it that way too.

    July 25, 2007

  • How's it supposed to be pronounced? -Miss Mid-Atlantic

    July 25, 2007

  • Same way it looks. "SHER bet." Silly. :-)

    July 25, 2007

  • Sher bet. Hahahahahah. You can't be serious. People actually pronounced sherbet. Like a bet?

    July 25, 2007

  • You bet. It's a sure bet.

    July 25, 2007

  • Nope. Gotta go with jennarenn on this. Sherbert. Extra R. It's a bona fide alternate spelling/pronunciation in American Heritage. (Which should be called Uniter Heritage, I suppose.)

    Where's chained_bear when you need a good sherbet/sorbet argument?

    July 25, 2007

  • I know! Send him our love, and tell him that I'm sending along that cookie recipe that he asked for. ;)

    July 25, 2007

  • Right. The cookie recipe. How could I have forgotten?

    July 25, 2007

  • Yeah but if you look at the derivation from sorbet, where's that extra r coming from, eh? - Canadian wannabe

    August 1, 2007