Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Judaism The first five books of the Hebrew Scriptures. See Table at Bible.
  • n. Judaism A scroll of parchment containing the first five books of the Hebrew Scriptures, used in a synagogue during services.
  • n. Judaism The entire body of religious law and learning including both sacred literature and oral tradition.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. The first five books of the Hebrew Scriptures, attributed to Moses and therefore also known as the Five Books of Moses.
  • proper n. The full body of written Jewish law, including the Tanakh, the Talmud, the Mishnah and the midrashic texts.
  • proper n. The whole of Jewish law, both written and unwritten.
  • proper n. The encompassing philosophy of Judaism.
  • n. A specially written scroll containing the five books of Moses, such as those used in religious services.
  • n. A book containing the five books of Moses.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A law; a precept.
  • n. Divine instruction; revelation.
  • n. The Pentateuch or “Law of Moses.”

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In ancient Hebrew literature, any decision or instruction in matters of law and conduct given by a sacred authority; the revealed will of God; specifically, the (Mosaic) law; hence, the book of the law, the Pentateuch.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. (Judaism) the scroll of parchment on which the first five books of the Hebrew Scripture is written; is used in a synagogue during services
  • n. the first of three divisions of the Hebrew Scriptures comprising the first five books of the Hebrew Bible considered as a unit
  • n. the whole body of the Jewish sacred writings and tradition including the oral tradition

Etymologies

Hebrew tôrâ, law, instruction, from hôrâ, to throw, direct, teach, derived stem of yārâ, to throw, shoot; see wrw in Semitic roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Hebrew תורה ("instruction, law or teaching"). (Wiktionary)

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