Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To make known (something private or secret).
  • transitive v. Archaic To proclaim publicly.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To make public; to several or communicate to the public; to tell (a secret) so that it may become generally known; to disclose; -- said of that which had been confided as a secret, or had been before unknown; as, to divulge a secret.
  • v. To indicate publicly; to proclaim.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intransitive v. To become publicly known.
  • transitive v. To make public; to several or communicate to the public; to tell (a secret) so that it may become generally known; to disclose; -- said of that which had been confided as a secret, or had been before unknown.
  • transitive v. To indicate publicly; to proclaim.
  • transitive v. To impart; to communicate.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To make public; send or scatter abroad; publish.
  • Specifically To tell or make known, as something before private or secret; reveal; disclose; declare openly.
  • To declare by a public act; proclaim.
  • To impart, as a gift or faculty; confer generally.
  • Synonyms To let out, disclose, betray, impart, communicate.
  • To become public; be made known; become visible.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. make known to the public information that was previously known only to a few people or that was meant to be kept a secret

Etymologies

Middle English divulgen, from Old French divulguer, from Latin dīvulgāre, to publish : dī-, dis-, among; see dis- + vulgāre, to spread among the multitude (from vulgus, common people).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Latin divulgare, from di- ("widely") + vulgare ("publish"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • "I would rather die than divulge anything," Charlotte protested solemnly, and her choice of the word divulge seemed to add considerably to the dignity of the proceedings.

    The Beth Book Being a Study of the Life of Elizabeth Caldwell Maclure, a Woman of Genius

  • What neither you nor your New York Times enablers divulge is that the CIA manifestly didn’t agree with the DIA’s assessment.

    Think Progress » Winning The War On Talking Points

  • No word divulge of all my purpose, as thou art to thy mistress loyal and likewise of my sex.

    Medea

  • And despite the pleas from your readers, you never divulge which is true and which are fabrications.

    (Mostly Dis)honest (S)crap Meme

  • By virtue of her rare acquaintance with savage customs, she was able to taunt the Barghîz with the horrors of their tribal mystery, to divulge which is _Death_!

    He

  • They talked of the bond that occurs when two individuals open up and share their true intentions and feelings, when they divulge real facts without hiding behind some cloak of fiction.

    Hemanshu Nigam: The Bachelorette and the Hope of Truth

  • But I'd also have thought that Christine, who declined to divulge her last name, was well past worrying about photography at that point.

    Tough Job in the Naked City

  • On the way over, he shared the kind of information that in later years Google would never divulge: real numbers about its servers and its searches.

    In the Plex

  • I could divulge that Jack's a bit of an international man of mystery.

    Tamsin Smith: Who Is Jack Ryan?

  • "As difficult as it would be for anybody to divulge their personal finances for all to see and critique," he said, "I have fully complied with the financial-disclosure requirements."

    Government Jobs, Outside Income

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